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Introduce Yourself • Re: Golden Harvest Canning jars and lids

September 30, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

UPDATE ON GOLDEN HARVEST CANNING JARS AND LIDS.

I just purchased 120 canning jars from a lady and there was some Golden Harvest Jars in the lot. I asked her if she ever had any issues with the Golden Harvest Jars and lids. She replied “NEVER”. “I have used them for years and never one problem. My opinion is folks are not using common sense and preventing thermal shock, proper space under the lids, and proper lid tightness.” This lady has always purchased her vegetables But now the cost of the vegetables has increased so much she has quit canning.

Is anyone else having problems with unreasonable prices on vegetables.

Well I guess that about says it all.

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Fri Sep 29, 2017 8:35 pm


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Introduce Yourself • ripshinmtn-new prepper-old country canning methods

September 18, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

Hello

I have just joined and all of you have already helped me so very much by assuring me the Golden Harvest lids and rings are good and very few problems.

I have a rekindled interest in canning and food prep. I developed a interest in canning before I left home for the US Army when I was 18 yrs old back in 1970. I remember my family canned over 500 quarts of green beans plus corn, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, peaches, kraut, squash, beets, pickles and other stuff i can’t remember. OH, YES! Also pickled eggs, pickled corn, pickled beans, pickled okra! Plus pork, chicken, and beef, jellies and jams.

We didn’t have pressure cookers back then. We used the submerged boiling water method. No stove tops were used here. We
used very long watering tubs/bath tub types (approx six feet long) that were actually used by farmers to water their live stock in. We dug
out trenches for 8 tubs, put 4 cinder blocks on each side and one cinder block on each end of the tubs. The trenches that the tubs sat over
were 2 1/2 feet deep and we built wooden fires under the water filled tubs. The glass canning jars were put into the cold water filled tubs with cloth rags sandwiched between the jars to prevent breakage. The water came to a rolling boil and did so for many, many hours for each canning cycle. I cannot remember one jar that was ever broken during our canning. The water and jars were allowed to cool down
on their own time at which time we removed the hot jars from the water and stored them in a spare room waiting for the lids to seal.
Of all the thousands of canned jars, I cannot remember one jar that did not seal. 8 very large farm watering tubs canned a lot of food in one day’s work.

We had a 3 acre garden and produced two crops of vegetables for our use and to sell to people in the nearby small towns. Plus a lot of apples.

The wood for the fires was purchased from a local lumber saw mill and was white pine that burned very well and hot.
When I came home four years later from the US Army, we went through the whole thing again. I then began college and canning was a thing of the past.

This all happened in North East Tennessee near Tennessee’s oldest community(Elizabethton) dating back into the mid 1700s.

I hope that you folks enjoyed this look at the past of when people really believed in putting up a whole lot of food freshly grown.

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Mon Sep 18, 2017 6:44 pm


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Introduce Yourself • ripshinmtn-new prepper-old country canning methods

September 18, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

Hello

I have just joined and all of you have already helped me so very much by assuring me the Golden Harvest lids and rings are good and very few problems.

I have a rekindled interest in canning and food prep. I developed a interest in canning before I left home for the US Army when I was 18 yrs old back in 1970. I remember my family canned over 500 quarts of green beans plus corn, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, peaches, kraut, squash, beets, pickles and other stuff i can’t remember. OH, YES! Also pickled eggs, pickled corn, pickled beans, pickled okra! Plus pork, chicken, and beef, jellies and jams.

We didn’t have pressure cookers back then. We used the submerged boiling water method. No stove tops were used here. We
used very long watering tubs/bath tub types (approx six feet long) that were actually used by farmers to water their live stock in. We dug
out trenches for 8 tubs, put 4 cinder blocks on each side and one cinder block on each end of the tubs. The trenches that the tubs sat over
were 2 1/2 feet deep and we built wooden fires under the water filled tubs. The glass canning jars were put into the cold water filled tubs with cloth rags sandwiched between the jars to prevent breakage. The water came to a rolling boil and did so for many, many hours for each canning cycle. I cannot remember one jar that was ever broken during our canning. The water and jars were allowed to cool down
on their own time at which time we removed the hot jars from the water and stored them in a spare room waiting for the lids to seal.
Of all the thousands of canned jars, I cannot remember one jar that did not seal. 8 very large farm watering tubs canned a lot of food in one day’s work.

We had a 3 acre garden and produced two crops of vegetables for our use and to sell to people in the nearby small towns. Plus a lot of apples.

The wood for the fires was purchased from a local lumber saw mill and was white pine that burned very well and hot.
When I came home four years later from the US Army, we went through the whole thing again. I then began college and canning was a thing of the past.

This all happened in North East Tennessee near Tennessee’s oldest community(Elizabethton) dating back into the mid 1700s.

I hope that you folks enjoyed this look at the past of when people really believed in putting up a whole lot of food freshly grown.

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Mon Sep 18, 2017 6:44 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Golden Harvest Canning jars and lids

September 18, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

HI again Everyone

Thanks so much for the your nice, prompt replies. I am more confident now that you have replied to my questions, Also, I found some info
where the Jarden Corporation replied to a question and stated that the Golden Harvest lids and rings were made to the same quality as Ball and Kerr in the same town and state. However, the packaging is not as fancy and therefore we can buy the Golden Harvest products much cheaper because we’re not paying for more expensive, fancy packaging.

I feel much safer now. Thanks Everyone!

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:41 pm