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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Interesting thoughts:

Here’s Why It Doesn’t Matter If North Korea Is Actually a Nuclear Threat
http://www.theorganicprepper.ca/heres-w … t-08022017

Daisy Luther

Those who believe that our own government is perfectly willing to commit an atrocity and then blame it on someone else tend to deny threats when they’re brought up consistently by the media. Let’s take the North Korea nuclear menace, for example.

I’ve been writing about the rising threat from North Korea for a long time and each time I publish a piece about their missile capability or some outrageous offense, it never fails that someone pops up and says, “North Korea doesn’t matter. The government is just making them the bad guy so the US can take military action and the people will support it.”

But in truth, that’s the part that doesn’t matter if you are a firm believer in false flags. Here’s the definition of false flags, if you’re unfamiliar with the concept:

The contemporary term false flag describes covert operations that are designed to deceive in such a way that activities appear as though they are being carried out by entities, groups, or nations other than those who actually planned and executed them…

…Proponents of political or religious ideologies will sometimes use false flag tactics. This can be done to discredit or implicate rival groups, create the appearance of enemies when none exist, or create the illusion of organized and directed persecution. This can be used to gain attention and sympathy from outsiders, in particular the media, or to convince others within the group that their beliefs are under attack and in need of protection. (source)

By now, everybody knows that the governments of the world are playing Game of Thrones and even the shocking brutality in that show is nothing compared to the things that we don’t know about happening right now during this “civilized” era.

Will we get nuked?

If North Korea is being painted as the nuclear wild card – and it is – what we really need to consider is not so much, “Will North Korea nuke us?” as “Will we get nuked?”

You have to read between the lines.

With this much hubbub, it seems like it’s building up to something. It is entirely possible that we could see a nuclear attack occur on American soil.

And here’s why I say North Korea doesn’t actually matter:

When you see that bright flash of light followed by a mushroom cloud on the horizon, will knowing the source of that cloud be the thing that saves your life or will knowing the steps to take to protect yourself be the deciding factor of whether you live or die?

In the heat of the moment (no pun intended), it simply doesn’t matter who is responsible.

Of course, later on, the culprits should be called out and dealt with appropriately. I’m not saying that false flag operations for power and political gain are acceptable. They are heinous and cowardly acts.

But that isn’t the point I’m trying to make. The topic of this article is survival, not blame.

In the midst of an event, the source doesn’t matter.

Every time there is a mass shooting and people begin trotting out the “false flag” plotlines, I urge people who wish to be prepared to look at the occurrence and not the source of it. Here’s why.

If you are crouched behind cover, racking the slide of your concealed carry firearm, will you care if the shooter is a black ops guy or a genuine crazy person in the heat of the moment? Nope. You will be focused on surviving, hopefully being able to take out the target before other people are hurt, and protecting your family. It won’t matter whether you’re in the midst of a false flag operation until later, after the lead is no longer flying.

Do you think the people in the tower on September 11th were saying, “I’ll bet the US government is behind this so they can pass some Draconian legislation” or “We have to get the heck out right now because a plane just hit our building and it’s on fire?” I’m just guessing here since I don’t personally know any survivors, but my money is on the fact that they were figuring out how to survive the imminent threat.

It’s the same thing with a nuclear strike. During the attack, what matters is accepting the fact that it happened, figuring out what to do, and taking action to survive.

You have to heed the warnings.

This isn’t an exercise to make you live in fear, but instead to make you live with awareness.

If the constant theme is that North Korea is planning to nuke us, but you really doubt that the responsible party will be Kim Jong Un and company, then that leaves you with “someone is planning to nuke us.”

Pay attention to that part and use it to help you get prepared.

It’s just like any other potentially “fake news.” You can nearly always find a grain of truth at the bottom of it.

News over the past week seems to mean that the sky is the limit with regard to the nuclear capability of North Korea. In the middle of the week, the concern was that Alaska, Hawaii, and parts of Canada were at risk. By Friday, however, a successful ICBM launch occurred that experts claimed proved a missile bearing a nuclear warhead could be launched by North Korea and strike as far into the mainland United States as Chicago.

Yesterday, it was reported that the United States had observed “highly unusual” submarine activity.

…what’s most concerning for U.S. security is North Korea’s new “Sinpo-class” ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs). Based on Russian ballistic missile submarines, the Sinpo-class carry North Korea to the next level of submarine warfare. The challenge posed by SSBNs is their disruption of an adversary’s confidence in detecting and destroying nuclear weapons before they can be used. While the U.S. tracks North Korean submarines, sometimes, as in 2010 when a North Korean submarine sank a South Korean corvette, they slip through the net. (source)

This means that coastlines and US naval operations could be at risk.

As well, last night, North Korea undertook a missile launch test from a completely different location, one with a direct line to China. What this tells us is that they may have many different places to launch and that taking out their nuclear headquarters may not be as simple as dropping a bomb on Pyongyang.

According to Park Hwee-rhak, a professor at Seoul’s Kookmin University, the location of the launch “is in mountainous terrain close to the border with China, so it is difficult for the US to hit it with a preemptive strike.” (source)

But that wasn’t the only unsettling news. Jeffrey Lewis wrote for the Daily Beast:

They tested from a surprise location deep inside North Korea, near the Chinese border where it would be hard to strike. And they did it at night when satellites that rely on optical images are useless. (That’s not every satellite, but it is a good number of them.) This looks like a test from an operational missile base. You know that Washington Post report that the missile will “will have advanced from prototype to assembly line” sometime in 2018? Surprise! (source)

According to Lewis, this means that they could have an unknown number of other hidden military bases. That means that taking out Pyongyang wouldn’t get the desired results of shutting down their nuclear program and that attacks could be much more difficult to predict or notice.

This isn’t to say that false flags never occur.

Please don’t take this the wrong way. I am not denying that false flags occur. Some have been so blatant that only the most stubbornly cognitive dissonant people can argue it.

I’m not saying that a nuclear strike will or will not be the work of North Korea, or that it will or will not be a false flag.

What I’m saying is that the warnings about a nuclear threat are real, regardless of the actual source of that strike. Disregard those warnings at your own peril, because if nukes start dropping you need to know what to do.

Go to this article to learn what you should do in the event of a nuclear strike. If you aren’t at Ground Zero, this is very survivable. And it isn’t going to turn our entire country into some horrific nuclear wasteland where you have to decide whether or not to eat your neighbors. It would be a truly devastating disaster, but it wouldn’t be what you see in the movies.

What are your thoughts about this?

Do you believe North Korea is a real threat or that this is all a Machiavellian, media-assisted plot to start a war? Are you concerned about the potential of a nuclear strike? I want to hear what you have to say in the comments below.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:07 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0

US Air Force Launches ICBM in Test From California During Heightened Tensions with North Korea
http://gizmodo.com/us-air-force-launche … 1797458557

The US Air Force successfully launched an unarmed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California this morning at 2:10am local time, 5:10am Eastern. The missile test, conducted with a Minuteman III, comes on the heels of North Korea’s second successful test of an ICBM.

The Air Force insists that the missile test has nothing to do with North Korea, but virtually every missile test over the coming months will be viewed through that lens, as things become more heated between the US and the Korean dictatorship. North Korea is certainly paying close attention to every single test.

The missile traveled roughly 4,200 miles to the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands, according to an Air Force press release issued early this morning. It was the fourth test of a Minuteman III in 2017, with previous tests occurring in February, April, and May.

“This operational test launch highlights the commitment and outstanding professionalism of the 90th Missile Wing, the 576th Flight Test Squadron and our mission partners in the 30th Space Wing,” said Col. Dave Kelley, 576th Flight Test Squadron commander in a statement.

“These test launches required the highest-degree of technical competence and commitment at every level and provide critical data necessary to validate the reliability, accuracy and performance of the ICBM force,” Kelly continued.

The Trump regime has sent mixed messages to North Korea in recent days, as has been the case whenever the president’s message on Twitter conflicts with more diplomatic minds in the government.

President Donald Trump has said that he’s “very disappointed” in China’s inability to curb the development of North Korea’s weapons program, and UN ambassador Nikki Haley has said that the US is “done talking about North Korea.”

But that rhetoric contradicts somewhat the more nuanced talking points coming from Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who insisted that the United States isn’t seeking regime change in North Korea.

“We’re not your enemy,” Tillerson said during a press conference at the State Department yesterday. It was his first such press conference at the department since taking office.

“We do not seek a regime change, we do not seek the collapse of the regime, we do not seek an accelerated reunification of the peninsula, we do not seek an excuse to send our military north of the 38th parallel,” said Tillerson in what could be viewed as a softening stance.

The most recent North Korean ICBM test showed a capability for the country to potentially hit targets throughout the US, including major cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. But there’s broad consensus among experts that North Korea hasn’t developed the technology to miniaturize nuclear material so that it can fit on a missile with that kind of range.

Most experts on the region agree that North Korea is still 1-2 years away from developing that kind of tech, but the question for current policymakers is what to do about it. Any bombing by US or South Korean forces in North Korea would likely be met with a strong show of force by Kim Jong-un’s regime. Even conventional weapons being used by North Korea has the potential to kill scores of people in nearby Seoul, South Korea.

And the fact that the current US president is unquestionably the dumbest leader that America has seen in at least a century doesn’t give many people hope that he’ll choose a course of action that won’t get thousands, if not millions, killed.

US commanders have repeatedly said that there are no good options for what to do about North Korea’s rising nuclear capability. But the big fear is that President Trump could still choose the worst of the admittedly bad options and start a war on the Korean peninsula.

Update 7:50am: The US Air Force just released video of the launch

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:01 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0

US Air Force Launches ICBM in Test From California During Heightened Tensions with North Korea
http://gizmodo.com/us-air-force-launche … 1797458557

The US Air Force successfully launched an unarmed intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California this morning at 2:10am local time, 5:10am Eastern. The missile test, conducted with a Minuteman III, comes on the heels of North Korea’s second successful test of an ICBM.

The Air Force insists that the missile test has nothing to do with North Korea, but virtually every missile test over the coming months will be viewed through that lens, as things become more heated between the US and the Korean dictatorship. North Korea is certainly paying close attention to every single test.

The missile traveled roughly 4,200 miles to the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands, according to an Air Force press release issued early this morning. It was the fourth test of a Minuteman III in 2017, with previous tests occurring in February, April, and May.

“This operational test launch highlights the commitment and outstanding professionalism of the 90th Missile Wing, the 576th Flight Test Squadron and our mission partners in the 30th Space Wing,” said Col. Dave Kelley, 576th Flight Test Squadron commander in a statement.

“These test launches required the highest-degree of technical competence and commitment at every level and provide critical data necessary to validate the reliability, accuracy and performance of the ICBM force,” Kelly continued.

The Trump regime has sent mixed messages to North Korea in recent days, as has been the case whenever the president’s message on Twitter conflicts with more diplomatic minds in the government.

President Donald Trump has said that he’s “very disappointed” in China’s inability to curb the development of North Korea’s weapons program, and UN ambassador Nikki Haley has said that the US is “done talking about North Korea.”

But that rhetoric contradicts somewhat the more nuanced talking points coming from Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who insisted that the United States isn’t seeking regime change in North Korea.

“We’re not your enemy,” Tillerson said during a press conference at the State Department yesterday. It was his first such press conference at the department since taking office.

“We do not seek a regime change, we do not seek the collapse of the regime, we do not seek an accelerated reunification of the peninsula, we do not seek an excuse to send our military north of the 38th parallel,” said Tillerson in what could be viewed as a softening stance.

The most recent North Korean ICBM test showed a capability for the country to potentially hit targets throughout the US, including major cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. But there’s broad consensus among experts that North Korea hasn’t developed the technology to miniaturize nuclear material so that it can fit on a missile with that kind of range.

Most experts on the region agree that North Korea is still 1-2 years away from developing that kind of tech, but the question for current policymakers is what to do about it. Any bombing by US or South Korean forces in North Korea would likely be met with a strong show of force by Kim Jong-un’s regime. Even conventional weapons being used by North Korea has the potential to kill scores of people in nearby Seoul, South Korea.

And the fact that the current US president is unquestionably the dumbest leader that America has seen in at least a century doesn’t give many people hope that he’ll choose a course of action that won’t get thousands, if not millions, killed.

US commanders have repeatedly said that there are no good options for what to do about North Korea’s rising nuclear capability. But the big fear is that President Trump could still choose the worst of the admittedly bad options and start a war on the Korean peninsula.

Update 7:50am: The US Air Force just released video of the launch

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed Aug 02, 2017 3:01 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 daaswampman 0
sageprice wrote:

daaswampman wrote:The very rich did not comply and many shipped there gold overseas. That is why collectors can still buy antique U.S. gold coins in uncirculated condition today at modest prices! I wish the skeptics could visit Dubai and see how gold works. Dubai is now among a handful of cities, that the worlds elite are flocking too.

When the dollar starts to flop, gold will skyrocket as trillions of fiat dollars chase real wealth. Foolish people will accept those dollars as old habits die hard and they will still see dollars as wealth. There will literally be gold buyers on every corner. The world is not limited to America, our dollar, or our inflated ego!

A good example is what is happened in Iran. During their wars with ISIS etc., the pickers are making a fortune on the antiquities flowing out the country and they pay in gold. It is always the same and there will always be people with money and those who what more.

I dare anyone to show me a single documented time – in all of human history, when there was not a market for gold. It is nothing more than a poor persons fantasy, that we are all be equal and will starve together. Don’t resent it – use it to your own advantage! What will the people with resources need and want? Swamp

Swamp, Gold is only a medium to trade. All the rest are credit currency and have no real value. Yes, there will be a market some where, but getting it there is another story. Brazilian miners only get 1/2 the value on the world market. So here is the point. You Have GOLD, I have gas. What are you going to trade me to take you and your gold to some place to trade your gold. No one else has gas and gold is heavy. WHERE are you going to sell it and HOW are you going to get it there? Remember you are at your remote BOL and there are miles of criminals before you sell and what curency will you accept.[/quote

That is why I have a plan! Part of my plan is not to need anything for years and that is in place. By the time I would need anything, we would either be on the road to recovery or beyond hope. I do not invest funds in metals that I should ever need to survive. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:49 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 daaswampman 0
sageprice wrote:

daaswampman wrote:The very rich did not comply and many shipped there gold overseas. That is why collectors can still buy antique U.S. gold coins in uncirculated condition today at modest prices! I wish the skeptics could visit Dubai and see how gold works. Dubai is now among a handful of cities, that the worlds elite are flocking too.

When the dollar starts to flop, gold will skyrocket as trillions of fiat dollars chase real wealth. Foolish people will accept those dollars as old habits die hard and they will still see dollars as wealth. There will literally be gold buyers on every corner. The world is not limited to America, our dollar, or our inflated ego!

A good example is what is happened in Iran. During their wars with ISIS etc., the pickers are making a fortune on the antiquities flowing out the country and they pay in gold. It is always the same and there will always be people with money and those who what more.

I dare anyone to show me a single documented time – in all of human history, when there was not a market for gold. It is nothing more than a poor persons fantasy, that we are all be equal and will starve together. Don’t resent it – use it to your own advantage! What will the people with resources need and want? Swamp

Swamp, Gold is only a medium to trade. All the rest are credit currency and have no real value. Yes, there will be a market some where, but getting it there is another story. Brazilian miners only get 1/2 the value on the world market. So here is the point. You Have GOLD, I have gas. What are you going to trade me to take you and your gold to some place to trade your gold. No one else has gas and gold is heavy. WHERE are you going to sell it and HOW are you going to get it there? Remember you are at your remote BOL and there are miles of criminals before you sell and what curency will you accept.[/quote

That is why I have a plan! Part of my plan is not to need anything for years and that is in place. By the time I would need anything, we would either be on the road to recovery or beyond hope. I do not invest funds in metals that I should ever need to survive. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:49 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 daaswampman 0
sageprice wrote:

daaswampman wrote:The very rich did not comply and many shipped there gold overseas. That is why collectors can still buy antique U.S. gold coins in uncirculated condition today at modest prices! I wish the skeptics could visit Dubai and see how gold works. Dubai is now among a handful of cities, that the worlds elite are flocking too.

When the dollar starts to flop, gold will skyrocket as trillions of fiat dollars chase real wealth. Foolish people will accept those dollars as old habits die hard and they will still see dollars as wealth. There will literally be gold buyers on every corner. The world is not limited to America, our dollar, or our inflated ego!

A good example is what is happened in Iran. During their wars with ISIS etc., the pickers are making a fortune on the antiquities flowing out the country and they pay in gold. It is always the same and there will always be people with money and those who what more.

I dare anyone to show me a single documented time – in all of human history, when there was not a market for gold. It is nothing more than a poor persons fantasy, that we are all be equal and will starve together. Don’t resent it – use it to your own advantage! What will the people with resources need and want? Swamp

Swamp, Gold is only a medium to trade. All the rest are credit currency and have no real value. Yes, there will be a market some where, but getting it there is another story. Brazilian miners only get 1/2 the value on the world market. So here is the point. You Have GOLD, I have gas. What are you going to trade me to take you and your gold to some place to trade your gold. No one else has gas and gold is heavy. WHERE are you going to sell it and HOW are you going to get it there? Remember you are at your remote BOL and there are miles of criminals before you sell and what curency will you accept.[/quote

That is why I have a plan! Part of my plan is not to need anything for years and that is in place. By the time I would need anything, we would either be on the road to recovery or beyond hope. I do not invest funds in metals that I should ever need to survive. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:49 pm


No Image

A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 daaswampman 0
sageprice wrote:

daaswampman wrote:The very rich did not comply and many shipped there gold overseas. That is why collectors can still buy antique U.S. gold coins in uncirculated condition today at modest prices! I wish the skeptics could visit Dubai and see how gold works. Dubai is now among a handful of cities, that the worlds elite are flocking too.

When the dollar starts to flop, gold will skyrocket as trillions of fiat dollars chase real wealth. Foolish people will accept those dollars as old habits die hard and they will still see dollars as wealth. There will literally be gold buyers on every corner. The world is not limited to America, our dollar, or our inflated ego!

A good example is what is happened in Iran. During their wars with ISIS etc., the pickers are making a fortune on the antiquities flowing out the country and they pay in gold. It is always the same and there will always be people with money and those who what more.

I dare anyone to show me a single documented time – in all of human history, when there was not a market for gold. It is nothing more than a poor persons fantasy, that we are all be equal and will starve together. Don’t resent it – use it to your own advantage! What will the people with resources need and want? Swamp

Swamp, Gold is only a medium to trade. All the rest are credit currency and have no real value. Yes, there will be a market some where, but getting it there is another story. Brazilian miners only get 1/2 the value on the world market. So here is the point. You Have GOLD, I have gas. What are you going to trade me to take you and your gold to some place to trade your gold. No one else has gas and gold is heavy. WHERE are you going to sell it and HOW are you going to get it there? Remember you are at your remote BOL and there are miles of criminals before you sell and what curency will you accept.[/quote

That is why I have a plan! Part of my plan is not to need anything for years and that is in place. By the time I would need anything, we would either be on the road to recovery or beyond hope. I do not invest funds in metals that I should ever need to survive. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:49 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

August 2, 2017 Cadit 0

Years ago, on the farm, we had signs like that up. One of my favorites was; If this isn’t you farm, then stay off it. The price for that mistake is to great. And another; go back down and stay above ground. Back in the day, country folks didn’t play, they were true to their word and believed in keeping one’s own integrity. Like in the military: we had codes to ID friendlies and foes, challenge words of phrases. This helped keep us alive and identify friendlies. This may be something that will be used in a grid down event. I know some who have already implemented this.

Statistics: Posted by Cadit — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:39 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

August 2, 2017 Cadit 0

Years ago, on the farm, we had signs like that up. One of my favorites was; If this isn’t you farm, then stay off it. The price for that mistake is to great. And another; go back down and stay above ground. Back in the day, country folks didn’t play, they were true to their word and believed in keeping one’s own integrity. Like in the military: we had codes to ID friendlies and foes, challenge words of phrases. This helped keep us alive and identify friendlies. This may be something that will be used in a grid down event. I know some who have already implemented this.

Statistics: Posted by Cadit — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:39 pm


No Image

A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

August 2, 2017 Cadit 0

Years ago, on the farm, we had signs like that up. One of my favorites was; If this isn’t you farm, then stay off it. The price for that mistake is to great. And another; go back down and stay above ground. Back in the day, country folks didn’t play, they were true to their word and believed in keeping one’s own integrity. Like in the military: we had codes to ID friendlies and foes, challenge words of phrases. This helped keep us alive and identify friendlies. This may be something that will be used in a grid down event. I know some who have already implemented this.

Statistics: Posted by Cadit — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:39 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 Cadit 0

As one pointed out; Gold and Silver has always been a medium of trade for thousands of years, I don’t think that will change. What worked then will also work now or if the SHTF event. It may take a little time for that to come about and level out to a normal trade value. But I think it will. History has proven that time after time. What we need to do is prepare and be able to work within that mode of trade. Wither its goods or precious metals. If you have gas, I bet someone or group will be around the corner to take it. So’ at first, everyone except your group if you’re in one, is your enemy and the only one you can truly trust is: yourself, excluding wife and kids.

Now I do agree that in the beginning; prices for things is going to be outrageous and costly. So; how will you handle that, some will resort to violence while others still or murder. But as in all things, even that will settle down after a time. If you have read any about the settlement of the west, much that same will be all across the country. Least that’s how I see it, and we each have our own view point. That’s what makes these discussions so great. I wish you all the best and a long life.

Statistics: Posted by Cadit — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:25 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 Cadit 0

As one pointed out; Gold and Silver has always been a medium of trade for thousands of years, I don’t think that will change. What worked then will also work now or if the SHTF event. It may take a little time for that to come about and level out to a normal trade value. But I think it will. History has proven that time after time. What we need to do is prepare and be able to work within that mode of trade. Wither its goods or precious metals. If you have gas, I bet someone or group will be around the corner to take it. So’ at first, everyone except your group if you’re in one, is your enemy and the only one you can truly trust is: yourself, excluding wife and kids.

Now I do agree that in the beginning; prices for things is going to be outrageous and costly. So; how will you handle that, some will resort to violence while others still or murder. But as in all things, even that will settle down after a time. If you have read any about the settlement of the west, much that same will be all across the country. Least that’s how I see it, and we each have our own view point. That’s what makes these discussions so great. I wish you all the best and a long life.

Statistics: Posted by Cadit — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:25 pm


No Image

A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 2, 2017 Cadit 0

As one pointed out; Gold and Silver has always been a medium of trade for thousands of years, I don’t think that will change. What worked then will also work now or if the SHTF event. It may take a little time for that to come about and level out to a normal trade value. But I think it will. History has proven that time after time. What we need to do is prepare and be able to work within that mode of trade. Wither its goods or precious metals. If you have gas, I bet someone or group will be around the corner to take it. So’ at first, everyone except your group if you’re in one, is your enemy and the only one you can truly trust is: yourself, excluding wife and kids.

Now I do agree that in the beginning; prices for things is going to be outrageous and costly. So; how will you handle that, some will resort to violence while others still or murder. But as in all things, even that will settle down after a time. If you have read any about the settlement of the west, much that same will be all across the country. Least that’s how I see it, and we each have our own view point. That’s what makes these discussions so great. I wish you all the best and a long life.

Statistics: Posted by Cadit — Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:25 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 NJMike 0

NK doesn’t have to reach the U.S. I think they’re developing that additional deterrent, but they really have more leverage than we do given all the artillery they have pointed at our ally S. Korea.

Regardless of the missile program, I’d think NK could easily reach our surface fleet now with their nukes if sufficiently provoked or if we pre-emptively attack them. The loss of a carrier group, or two, or more, could arguably be more damaging to the U.S. long term interests than a single city being nuked. A city would galvanize our resolve and make us a victim. A naval disaster would cause a loss of world political power and possibly the world would say we had it coming. Russia and China will likely overtly side with NK, on the pretext of any disproportionate U.S. response or us goading NK into conflict, especially if civilian areas in NK are hit by a counter strike. If this also coincides with a massive cyber attack from any of the 3 on our banking or stock market, or both, we’d potentially lose our economy on top of a significant amount of power projection in the world.

Just speculation and there are dozens of scenarios like that. I feel we do have a lot more to lose in starting a war, than we stand to gain from glassing over NK. I’m in favor of a diplomatic resolution, or failing that a more covert attempt at regime change to remove Kim Jong-un. He really is the James Bond Villain of our time.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:38 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 NJMike 0

NK doesn’t have to reach the U.S. I think they’re developing that additional deterrent, but they really have more leverage than we do given all the artillery they have pointed at our ally S. Korea.

Regardless of the missile program, I’d think NK could easily reach our surface fleet now with their nukes if sufficiently provoked or if we pre-emptively attack them. The loss of a carrier group, or two, or more, could arguably be more damaging to the U.S. long term interests than a single city being nuked. A city would galvanize our resolve and make us a victim. A naval disaster would cause a loss of world political power and possibly the world would say we had it coming. Russia and China will likely overtly side with NK, on the pretext of any disproportionate U.S. response or us goading NK into conflict, especially if civilian areas in NK are hit by a counter strike. If this also coincides with a massive cyber attack from any of the 3 on our banking or stock market, or both, we’d potentially lose our economy on top of a significant amount of power projection in the world.

Just speculation and there are dozens of scenarios like that. I feel we do have a lot more to lose in starting a war, than we stand to gain from glassing over NK. I’m in favor of a diplomatic resolution, or failing that a more covert attempt at regime change to remove Kim Jong-un. He really is the James Bond Villain of our time.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:38 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 NJMike 0

NK doesn’t have to reach the U.S. I think they’re developing that additional deterrent, but they really have more leverage than we do given all the artillery they have pointed at our ally S. Korea.

Regardless of the missile program, I’d think NK could easily reach our surface fleet now with their nukes if sufficiently provoked or if we pre-emptively attack them. The loss of a carrier group, or two, or more, could arguably be more damaging to the U.S. long term interests than a single city being nuked. A city would galvanize our resolve and make us a victim. A naval disaster would cause a loss of world political power and possibly the world would say we had it coming. Russia and China will likely overtly side with NK, on the pretext of any disproportionate U.S. response or us goading NK into conflict, especially if civilian areas in NK are hit by a counter strike. If this also coincides with a massive cyber attack from any of the 3 on our banking or stock market, or both, we’d potentially lose our economy on top of a significant amount of power projection in the world.

Just speculation and there are dozens of scenarios like that. I feel we do have a lot more to lose in starting a war, than we stand to gain from glassing over NK. I’m in favor of a diplomatic resolution, or failing that a more covert attempt at regime change to remove Kim Jong-un. He really is the James Bond Villain of our time.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:38 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
TRex2 wrote:
While there submarines pose no direct threat to our mainland (they just don’t have the range, period (they would have to be carried over here on a ship and launched), they could pose a threat to anything within 1000 miles of Korea, and could be part of his strategy.

For instance, he might decide to use his ICBM to launch an attack on our mainland, and then use the subs to try to repel our retaliatory strike.

That it would not work is beside the point, when dealing with him. We have to consider what he might do in a grand moment of irrationality.

I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

range – on their own – no …. but not if they are mothered across the Pacific by say – a container ship … there’s more than enough room for one of their nukes – and die hard-loyal party-cadre captains to deliver the package …. takes away the uncertainty of sending the package in a CDX box covered in Chinese made goods for Wally World …

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:08 am


No Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
TRex2 wrote:
While there submarines pose no direct threat to our mainland (they just don’t have the range, period (they would have to be carried over here on a ship and launched), they could pose a threat to anything within 1000 miles of Korea, and could be part of his strategy.

For instance, he might decide to use his ICBM to launch an attack on our mainland, and then use the subs to try to repel our retaliatory strike.

That it would not work is beside the point, when dealing with him. We have to consider what he might do in a grand moment of irrationality.

I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

range – on their own – no …. but not if they are mothered across the Pacific by say – a container ship … there’s more than enough room for one of their nukes – and die hard-loyal party-cadre captains to deliver the package …. takes away the uncertainty of sending the package in a CDX box covered in Chinese made goods for Wally World …

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:08 am


No Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
TRex2 wrote:
While there submarines pose no direct threat to our mainland (they just don’t have the range, period (they would have to be carried over here on a ship and launched), they could pose a threat to anything within 1000 miles of Korea, and could be part of his strategy.

For instance, he might decide to use his ICBM to launch an attack on our mainland, and then use the subs to try to repel our retaliatory strike.

That it would not work is beside the point, when dealing with him. We have to consider what he might do in a grand moment of irrationality.

I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

range – on their own – no …. but not if they are mothered across the Pacific by say – a container ship … there’s more than enough room for one of their nukes – and die hard-loyal party-cadre captains to deliver the package …. takes away the uncertainty of sending the package in a CDX box covered in Chinese made goods for Wally World …

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:08 am


Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom !

August 2, 2017 gman 0

Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom Ray Becker… “The Ray Becker Show” Audio player provided! A show opener with the latest in economic news. After that a review the Prepper Roundtable from last Friday night. Then we  spend some quality time with Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom. I first came … Continue reading Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom !

The post Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom ! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom !

August 2, 2017 gman 0

Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom Ray Becker… “The Ray Becker Show” Audio player provided! A show opener with the latest in economic news. After that a review the Prepper Roundtable from last Friday night. Then we  spend some quality time with Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom. I first came … Continue reading Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom !

The post Ray visits Joe and Amy of Doom & Bloom ! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Lindsey Graham Tells The “Today” Show That Unless North Korea De-Escalates, War Is “Inevitable”
https://www.sarahpalin.com/lindsey-grah … e/?ref=Ads

August 1, 2017

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said this week that if the escalation of North Korea’s missile program continues, war will be “inevitable.”

“You’re making the president pick between regional stability and homeland stability,” Graham said on the “Today” show.

Check it out:

“They’ve kicked the can down the road for 20 years. There will be a war with North Korea over the missile program if they continue to try to hit America with an ICBM.”

Graham said President Donald Trump has “told me that, and I believe him.”

“If I were China, I would believe him too, and do something about it,” said Graham. “You can stop North Korea, militarily or diplomatically. I prefer the diplomatic approach.”

However, North Korea “will not be allowed to have a missile to hit America with a nuclear weapon on top,” the senator said. “To allow them to do that is abandoning homeland security.”

The Senator went on to say that North Korea will only disengage if there’s a “credible threat of military force.”

He also said it’s likely China would be dragged into the mix as well.

“If there’s going to be war to stop them, it will be over there,” said Graham. “If thousands die, they will die over there. That may be provocative, but not really. When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States.”

= = = = MORE = = = =

Lindsey Graham: Trump “told me” he will bomb North Korea if it keeps testing missiles
https://www.vox.com/world/2017/8/1/1607 … yptr=yahoo

Aug 1, 2017,

On Tuesday morning, Sen. Lindsey Graham said that President Trump is willing to go to war with North Korea to stop it from being able to hit the American mainland with a nuclear weapon.

“There is a military option: to destroy North Korea’s nuclear program and North Korea itself,” Graham told the Today show’s Matt Lauer. “He’s not going to allow — President Trump — the ability of this madman [Kim Jong Un] to have a missile that could hit America.

“If there’s going to be a war to stop him, it will be over there,” Graham continued. “If thousands die, they’re going to die over there. They’re not going to die over here — and he’s told me that to my face.”

Graham’s press office confirmed that the senator was, in fact, reciting the details of a conversation he had with the president. According to Graham, the president “doesn’t want a war” — but would be willing to start one that would kill millions of people in the region if it came down to it.

Graham went even further later in the interview, saying war between the United States and North Korea was “inevitable” under this president unless North Korea stops testing intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). These missiles, Graham says, are an unacceptable threat to the American homeland — so Trump would go to war to stop them:

LAUER: Are you saying it’s okay to use a military option that immediately endangers the lives of millions of people in that region?

GRAHAM: I’m saying it’s inevitable unless North Korea changes, because you’re making our president pick between regional stability and homeland security. He’s having to make a choice that no president has wanted to make. They’ve kicked the can down the road for 20 years; there’s nowhere else to kick it. There will be a war with North Korea over their missile program if they continue trying to hit America with an ICBM. He’s told me that, and I believe him.

Now, we don’t know if Graham is accurately conveying what the president said or merely putting words in his mouth. A senior White House official, when asked about Graham’s comments, told me that “all options remain on the table” — but also noted that the administration’s policy right now was to apply “maximum diplomatic and economic pressure to convince North Korea to change course.”

It’s clear from the interview that Graham himself supports military action against North Korea, so it’s possible he’s just trying to position the president on his side of the debate. It’s also possible that he’s just trying to establish a threatening position to increase US leverage in negotiations with North Korea and China, Pyongyang’s patron.

But it’s also possible that Graham is simply telling the truth: that both he and the president are willing to risk a catastrophic war that could threaten the lives of millions of North Koreans, South Koreans, and Japanese — not to mention the 28,500 US troops stationed in South Korea — to head off an as-yet-theoretical threat to the United States.

“This is madness,” Kingston Reif, the director for disarmament and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control Association, tweeted after seeing Graham’s comments. “Unhinged madness.”

The costs of a Korean war are nearly inconceivable

It is not yet clear that North Korea’s missile program is a direct threat to the US homeland. The missiles theoretically have enough range to go as far as the Eastern Seaboard, but it’s not clear if North Korea has the technology to attach a nuclear warhead to these missiles. It’s also not clear how accurate its missiles are.

What’s more, virtually every expert on North Korea agrees that Kim Jong Un is rational: that he wants nuclear weapons not to wipe out an American city, which would clearly lead to retaliation that would decimate the country, but to protect the North from foreign invasion or regime change. There’s still a risk of a nuclear strike in a tense situation — a Korean equivalent to the Cuban Missile Crisis that goes wrong — but on the whole, there’s no reason to think that North Korea is significantly harder to deter than the Soviet Union was.

So the threat posed by North Korea’s ICBM program, while not insignificant, is not fully established. But we what do know is that war with North Korea today would probably kill hundreds of thousands — if not millions.

The North Koreans are not stupid: They know they’re militarily outclassed by the United States and South Korea. So their strategy in the event of an out-and-out war, as far as outside analysts can tell, is to inflict overwhelming pain as quickly as possible: to bombard South Korea, US allies in Japan, and any American forces they can find with missiles and artillery to the point where their stronger enemies lose their appetite for a protracted conflict.

The estimates of a conflict involving the North’s nonnuclear arsenal alone are hard to fathom. My colleague Alex Ward spells some out:

South Korea’s capital city, Seoul, is a so-called “megacity” with a whopping 25.6 million residents living in the greater metropolitan area. It also happens to be within direct firing range of thousands of pieces of North Korean artillery already lined up along the border, also known as the demilitarized zone. Around 70 percent of North Korea’s ground forces are within 90 miles of the DMZ, presumably ready to move south at a moment’s notice.

Simulations of a large-scale artillery fight between the North and South produce pretty bleak results. One war game convened by the Atlantic back in 2005 predicted that a North Korean attack would kill 100,000 people in Seoul in the first few days alone. Others put the estimate even higher. A war game mentioned by the National Interest predicted Seoul could “be hit by over half-a-million shells in under an hour.”

Here’s an even grimmer statistic: A South Korean simulation conducted in 2004, before the North had developed nuclear weapons, estimated that there could be up to 2 million casualties in the first 24 hours of a conflict.

Obviously, the death toll would be exponentially higher if North Korea used any of its nuclear weapons. Those could potentially destroy Tokyo (population 9.3 million), Seoul (population 10 million), or other cities in the two countries.

It’s not clear how many working nuclear weapons the North has, though estimates suggest around 10 to 16. We do know that its missiles have enough range to reach Tokyo, and that the country has tested a nuclear weapon designed to fit on precisely such a missile.

Best expert guesses suggest the North would try to nuke US forces in the region if attacked, in order to try to limit America’s ability to help South Korea in ground combat on the Korean Peninsula. But Pyongyang could also target population centers as well — despite the likelihood that any such attack would invite nuclear retaliation from the United States, which has mutual defense agreements with both Japan and South Korea.

“Its rhetoric and accelerated pace of missile testing suggests that North Korea would be the first to use nuclear weapons if it believed itself to be under attack,” Mark Fitzpatrick, the executive director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies America think tank, writes. “Its nuclear posture incorporates the ‘use them or lose them’ principle.”

In short? What Graham and, allegedly, Trump are talking about is far beyond even the horror of the Iraq War. They are loosely talking about risking hundreds of thousands, quite possibly millions, of lives to head off a threat that is, as of right now, still hypothetical.

Graham justifies his attitude, and allegedly the president’s, by reference to patriotism.

“When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States,” he said in the interview.

It’s troubling enough that a senator thinks this. If the president, who has the ability to actually start a war with North Korea, agrees, we should all be concerned.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:35 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Lindsey Graham Tells The “Today” Show That Unless North Korea De-Escalates, War Is “Inevitable”
https://www.sarahpalin.com/lindsey-grah … e/?ref=Ads

August 1, 2017

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said this week that if the escalation of North Korea’s missile program continues, war will be “inevitable.”

“You’re making the president pick between regional stability and homeland stability,” Graham said on the “Today” show.

Check it out:

“They’ve kicked the can down the road for 20 years. There will be a war with North Korea over the missile program if they continue to try to hit America with an ICBM.”

Graham said President Donald Trump has “told me that, and I believe him.”

“If I were China, I would believe him too, and do something about it,” said Graham. “You can stop North Korea, militarily or diplomatically. I prefer the diplomatic approach.”

However, North Korea “will not be allowed to have a missile to hit America with a nuclear weapon on top,” the senator said. “To allow them to do that is abandoning homeland security.”

The Senator went on to say that North Korea will only disengage if there’s a “credible threat of military force.”

He also said it’s likely China would be dragged into the mix as well.

“If there’s going to be war to stop them, it will be over there,” said Graham. “If thousands die, they will die over there. That may be provocative, but not really. When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States.”

= = = = MORE = = = =

Lindsey Graham: Trump “told me” he will bomb North Korea if it keeps testing missiles
https://www.vox.com/world/2017/8/1/1607 … yptr=yahoo

Aug 1, 2017,

On Tuesday morning, Sen. Lindsey Graham said that President Trump is willing to go to war with North Korea to stop it from being able to hit the American mainland with a nuclear weapon.

“There is a military option: to destroy North Korea’s nuclear program and North Korea itself,” Graham told the Today show’s Matt Lauer. “He’s not going to allow — President Trump — the ability of this madman [Kim Jong Un] to have a missile that could hit America.

“If there’s going to be a war to stop him, it will be over there,” Graham continued. “If thousands die, they’re going to die over there. They’re not going to die over here — and he’s told me that to my face.”

Graham’s press office confirmed that the senator was, in fact, reciting the details of a conversation he had with the president. According to Graham, the president “doesn’t want a war” — but would be willing to start one that would kill millions of people in the region if it came down to it.

Graham went even further later in the interview, saying war between the United States and North Korea was “inevitable” under this president unless North Korea stops testing intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). These missiles, Graham says, are an unacceptable threat to the American homeland — so Trump would go to war to stop them:

LAUER: Are you saying it’s okay to use a military option that immediately endangers the lives of millions of people in that region?

GRAHAM: I’m saying it’s inevitable unless North Korea changes, because you’re making our president pick between regional stability and homeland security. He’s having to make a choice that no president has wanted to make. They’ve kicked the can down the road for 20 years; there’s nowhere else to kick it. There will be a war with North Korea over their missile program if they continue trying to hit America with an ICBM. He’s told me that, and I believe him.

Now, we don’t know if Graham is accurately conveying what the president said or merely putting words in his mouth. A senior White House official, when asked about Graham’s comments, told me that “all options remain on the table” — but also noted that the administration’s policy right now was to apply “maximum diplomatic and economic pressure to convince North Korea to change course.”

It’s clear from the interview that Graham himself supports military action against North Korea, so it’s possible he’s just trying to position the president on his side of the debate. It’s also possible that he’s just trying to establish a threatening position to increase US leverage in negotiations with North Korea and China, Pyongyang’s patron.

But it’s also possible that Graham is simply telling the truth: that both he and the president are willing to risk a catastrophic war that could threaten the lives of millions of North Koreans, South Koreans, and Japanese — not to mention the 28,500 US troops stationed in South Korea — to head off an as-yet-theoretical threat to the United States.

“This is madness,” Kingston Reif, the director for disarmament and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control Association, tweeted after seeing Graham’s comments. “Unhinged madness.”

The costs of a Korean war are nearly inconceivable

It is not yet clear that North Korea’s missile program is a direct threat to the US homeland. The missiles theoretically have enough range to go as far as the Eastern Seaboard, but it’s not clear if North Korea has the technology to attach a nuclear warhead to these missiles. It’s also not clear how accurate its missiles are.

What’s more, virtually every expert on North Korea agrees that Kim Jong Un is rational: that he wants nuclear weapons not to wipe out an American city, which would clearly lead to retaliation that would decimate the country, but to protect the North from foreign invasion or regime change. There’s still a risk of a nuclear strike in a tense situation — a Korean equivalent to the Cuban Missile Crisis that goes wrong — but on the whole, there’s no reason to think that North Korea is significantly harder to deter than the Soviet Union was.

So the threat posed by North Korea’s ICBM program, while not insignificant, is not fully established. But we what do know is that war with North Korea today would probably kill hundreds of thousands — if not millions.

The North Koreans are not stupid: They know they’re militarily outclassed by the United States and South Korea. So their strategy in the event of an out-and-out war, as far as outside analysts can tell, is to inflict overwhelming pain as quickly as possible: to bombard South Korea, US allies in Japan, and any American forces they can find with missiles and artillery to the point where their stronger enemies lose their appetite for a protracted conflict.

The estimates of a conflict involving the North’s nonnuclear arsenal alone are hard to fathom. My colleague Alex Ward spells some out:

South Korea’s capital city, Seoul, is a so-called “megacity” with a whopping 25.6 million residents living in the greater metropolitan area. It also happens to be within direct firing range of thousands of pieces of North Korean artillery already lined up along the border, also known as the demilitarized zone. Around 70 percent of North Korea’s ground forces are within 90 miles of the DMZ, presumably ready to move south at a moment’s notice.

Simulations of a large-scale artillery fight between the North and South produce pretty bleak results. One war game convened by the Atlantic back in 2005 predicted that a North Korean attack would kill 100,000 people in Seoul in the first few days alone. Others put the estimate even higher. A war game mentioned by the National Interest predicted Seoul could “be hit by over half-a-million shells in under an hour.”

Here’s an even grimmer statistic: A South Korean simulation conducted in 2004, before the North had developed nuclear weapons, estimated that there could be up to 2 million casualties in the first 24 hours of a conflict.

Obviously, the death toll would be exponentially higher if North Korea used any of its nuclear weapons. Those could potentially destroy Tokyo (population 9.3 million), Seoul (population 10 million), or other cities in the two countries.

It’s not clear how many working nuclear weapons the North has, though estimates suggest around 10 to 16. We do know that its missiles have enough range to reach Tokyo, and that the country has tested a nuclear weapon designed to fit on precisely such a missile.

Best expert guesses suggest the North would try to nuke US forces in the region if attacked, in order to try to limit America’s ability to help South Korea in ground combat on the Korean Peninsula. But Pyongyang could also target population centers as well — despite the likelihood that any such attack would invite nuclear retaliation from the United States, which has mutual defense agreements with both Japan and South Korea.

“Its rhetoric and accelerated pace of missile testing suggests that North Korea would be the first to use nuclear weapons if it believed itself to be under attack,” Mark Fitzpatrick, the executive director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies America think tank, writes. “Its nuclear posture incorporates the ‘use them or lose them’ principle.”

In short? What Graham and, allegedly, Trump are talking about is far beyond even the horror of the Iraq War. They are loosely talking about risking hundreds of thousands, quite possibly millions, of lives to head off a threat that is, as of right now, still hypothetical.

Graham justifies his attitude, and allegedly the president’s, by reference to patriotism.

“When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States,” he said in the interview.

It’s troubling enough that a senator thinks this. If the president, who has the ability to actually start a war with North Korea, agrees, we should all be concerned.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:35 pm


No Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Lindsey Graham Tells The “Today” Show That Unless North Korea De-Escalates, War Is “Inevitable”
https://www.sarahpalin.com/lindsey-grah … e/?ref=Ads

August 1, 2017

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said this week that if the escalation of North Korea’s missile program continues, war will be “inevitable.”

“You’re making the president pick between regional stability and homeland stability,” Graham said on the “Today” show.

Check it out:

“They’ve kicked the can down the road for 20 years. There will be a war with North Korea over the missile program if they continue to try to hit America with an ICBM.”

Graham said President Donald Trump has “told me that, and I believe him.”

“If I were China, I would believe him too, and do something about it,” said Graham. “You can stop North Korea, militarily or diplomatically. I prefer the diplomatic approach.”

However, North Korea “will not be allowed to have a missile to hit America with a nuclear weapon on top,” the senator said. “To allow them to do that is abandoning homeland security.”

The Senator went on to say that North Korea will only disengage if there’s a “credible threat of military force.”

He also said it’s likely China would be dragged into the mix as well.

“If there’s going to be war to stop them, it will be over there,” said Graham. “If thousands die, they will die over there. That may be provocative, but not really. When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States.”

= = = = MORE = = = =

Lindsey Graham: Trump “told me” he will bomb North Korea if it keeps testing missiles
https://www.vox.com/world/2017/8/1/1607 … yptr=yahoo

Aug 1, 2017,

On Tuesday morning, Sen. Lindsey Graham said that President Trump is willing to go to war with North Korea to stop it from being able to hit the American mainland with a nuclear weapon.

“There is a military option: to destroy North Korea’s nuclear program and North Korea itself,” Graham told the Today show’s Matt Lauer. “He’s not going to allow — President Trump — the ability of this madman [Kim Jong Un] to have a missile that could hit America.

“If there’s going to be a war to stop him, it will be over there,” Graham continued. “If thousands die, they’re going to die over there. They’re not going to die over here — and he’s told me that to my face.”

Graham’s press office confirmed that the senator was, in fact, reciting the details of a conversation he had with the president. According to Graham, the president “doesn’t want a war” — but would be willing to start one that would kill millions of people in the region if it came down to it.

Graham went even further later in the interview, saying war between the United States and North Korea was “inevitable” under this president unless North Korea stops testing intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). These missiles, Graham says, are an unacceptable threat to the American homeland — so Trump would go to war to stop them:

LAUER: Are you saying it’s okay to use a military option that immediately endangers the lives of millions of people in that region?

GRAHAM: I’m saying it’s inevitable unless North Korea changes, because you’re making our president pick between regional stability and homeland security. He’s having to make a choice that no president has wanted to make. They’ve kicked the can down the road for 20 years; there’s nowhere else to kick it. There will be a war with North Korea over their missile program if they continue trying to hit America with an ICBM. He’s told me that, and I believe him.

Now, we don’t know if Graham is accurately conveying what the president said or merely putting words in his mouth. A senior White House official, when asked about Graham’s comments, told me that “all options remain on the table” — but also noted that the administration’s policy right now was to apply “maximum diplomatic and economic pressure to convince North Korea to change course.”

It’s clear from the interview that Graham himself supports military action against North Korea, so it’s possible he’s just trying to position the president on his side of the debate. It’s also possible that he’s just trying to establish a threatening position to increase US leverage in negotiations with North Korea and China, Pyongyang’s patron.

But it’s also possible that Graham is simply telling the truth: that both he and the president are willing to risk a catastrophic war that could threaten the lives of millions of North Koreans, South Koreans, and Japanese — not to mention the 28,500 US troops stationed in South Korea — to head off an as-yet-theoretical threat to the United States.

“This is madness,” Kingston Reif, the director for disarmament and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control Association, tweeted after seeing Graham’s comments. “Unhinged madness.”

The costs of a Korean war are nearly inconceivable

It is not yet clear that North Korea’s missile program is a direct threat to the US homeland. The missiles theoretically have enough range to go as far as the Eastern Seaboard, but it’s not clear if North Korea has the technology to attach a nuclear warhead to these missiles. It’s also not clear how accurate its missiles are.

What’s more, virtually every expert on North Korea agrees that Kim Jong Un is rational: that he wants nuclear weapons not to wipe out an American city, which would clearly lead to retaliation that would decimate the country, but to protect the North from foreign invasion or regime change. There’s still a risk of a nuclear strike in a tense situation — a Korean equivalent to the Cuban Missile Crisis that goes wrong — but on the whole, there’s no reason to think that North Korea is significantly harder to deter than the Soviet Union was.

So the threat posed by North Korea’s ICBM program, while not insignificant, is not fully established. But we what do know is that war with North Korea today would probably kill hundreds of thousands — if not millions.

The North Koreans are not stupid: They know they’re militarily outclassed by the United States and South Korea. So their strategy in the event of an out-and-out war, as far as outside analysts can tell, is to inflict overwhelming pain as quickly as possible: to bombard South Korea, US allies in Japan, and any American forces they can find with missiles and artillery to the point where their stronger enemies lose their appetite for a protracted conflict.

The estimates of a conflict involving the North’s nonnuclear arsenal alone are hard to fathom. My colleague Alex Ward spells some out:

South Korea’s capital city, Seoul, is a so-called “megacity” with a whopping 25.6 million residents living in the greater metropolitan area. It also happens to be within direct firing range of thousands of pieces of North Korean artillery already lined up along the border, also known as the demilitarized zone. Around 70 percent of North Korea’s ground forces are within 90 miles of the DMZ, presumably ready to move south at a moment’s notice.

Simulations of a large-scale artillery fight between the North and South produce pretty bleak results. One war game convened by the Atlantic back in 2005 predicted that a North Korean attack would kill 100,000 people in Seoul in the first few days alone. Others put the estimate even higher. A war game mentioned by the National Interest predicted Seoul could “be hit by over half-a-million shells in under an hour.”

Here’s an even grimmer statistic: A South Korean simulation conducted in 2004, before the North had developed nuclear weapons, estimated that there could be up to 2 million casualties in the first 24 hours of a conflict.

Obviously, the death toll would be exponentially higher if North Korea used any of its nuclear weapons. Those could potentially destroy Tokyo (population 9.3 million), Seoul (population 10 million), or other cities in the two countries.

It’s not clear how many working nuclear weapons the North has, though estimates suggest around 10 to 16. We do know that its missiles have enough range to reach Tokyo, and that the country has tested a nuclear weapon designed to fit on precisely such a missile.

Best expert guesses suggest the North would try to nuke US forces in the region if attacked, in order to try to limit America’s ability to help South Korea in ground combat on the Korean Peninsula. But Pyongyang could also target population centers as well — despite the likelihood that any such attack would invite nuclear retaliation from the United States, which has mutual defense agreements with both Japan and South Korea.

“Its rhetoric and accelerated pace of missile testing suggests that North Korea would be the first to use nuclear weapons if it believed itself to be under attack,” Mark Fitzpatrick, the executive director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies America think tank, writes. “Its nuclear posture incorporates the ‘use them or lose them’ principle.”

In short? What Graham and, allegedly, Trump are talking about is far beyond even the horror of the Iraq War. They are loosely talking about risking hundreds of thousands, quite possibly millions, of lives to head off a threat that is, as of right now, still hypothetical.

Graham justifies his attitude, and allegedly the president’s, by reference to patriotism.

“When you’re president of the United States, where does your allegiance lie? To the people of the United States,” he said in the interview.

It’s troubling enough that a senator thinks this. If the president, who has the ability to actually start a war with North Korea, agrees, we should all be concerned.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:35 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0
TRex2 wrote:
I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

He’s getting help from China & Iran. Could he be a piece of a larger plot? Or does China like our financial ties too much?

Then again … if he has a vendetta from the Korean war (on behalf of his Grandfather), maybe that is all he sees, so he doesn’t care.

And then again … maybe need to get a life and quit trying to think this through too much :blush: . That’s probably it.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:31 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0
TRex2 wrote:
I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

He’s getting help from China & Iran. Could he be a piece of a larger plot? Or does China like our financial ties too much?

Then again … if he has a vendetta from the Korean war (on behalf of his Grandfather), maybe that is all he sees, so he doesn’t care.

And then again … maybe need to get a life and quit trying to think this through too much :blush: . That’s probably it.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:31 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0
TRex2 wrote:
I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

He’s getting help from China & Iran. Could he be a piece of a larger plot? Or does China like our financial ties too much?

Then again … if he has a vendetta from the Korean war (on behalf of his Grandfather), maybe that is all he sees, so he doesn’t care.

And then again … maybe need to get a life and quit trying to think this through too much :blush: . That’s probably it.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:31 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 TRex2 0

While there submarines pose no direct threat to our mainland (they just don’t have the range, period (they would have to be carried over here on a ship and launched), they could pose a threat to anything within 1000 miles of Korea, and could be part of his strategy.

For instance, he might decide to use his ICBM to launch an attack on our mainland, and then use the subs to try to repel our retaliatory strike.

That it would not work is beside the point, when dealing with him. We have to consider what he might do in a grand moment of irrationality.

I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

Statistics: Posted by TRex2 — Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:12 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 TRex2 0

While there submarines pose no direct threat to our mainland (they just don’t have the range, period (they would have to be carried over here on a ship and launched), they could pose a threat to anything within 1000 miles of Korea, and could be part of his strategy.

For instance, he might decide to use his ICBM to launch an attack on our mainland, and then use the subs to try to repel our retaliatory strike.

That it would not work is beside the point, when dealing with him. We have to consider what he might do in a grand moment of irrationality.

I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

Statistics: Posted by TRex2 — Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:12 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 2, 2017 TRex2 0

While there submarines pose no direct threat to our mainland (they just don’t have the range, period (they would have to be carried over here on a ship and launched), they could pose a threat to anything within 1000 miles of Korea, and could be part of his strategy.

For instance, he might decide to use his ICBM to launch an attack on our mainland, and then use the subs to try to repel our retaliatory strike.

That it would not work is beside the point, when dealing with him. We have to consider what he might do in a grand moment of irrationality.

I doubt he could land a killing blow, but he could do enough damage that we would be vulnerable to all sorts of other threats.

Statistics: Posted by TRex2 — Tue Aug 01, 2017 8:12 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Hey new to forum from WI

August 2, 2017 IceFire 0

Welcome, prep38!

As to your question regarding PMs, I think it is only prudent to have some as part of your preps. First, make sure you have food/water, essential supplies, etc. I feel that PMs should be part of your financial preps. Do your best to pay down/eliminate debt, have several months’ worth of living expenses saved up, and invest in PMs–NOT PMs on paper…have the physical stuff that YOU control.

For me, personally, I prefer to have my “savings” where I have immediate access. I keep enough in the bank to handle monthly expenses, and keep the rest “elsewhere”, where I don’t have to worry about “bank holidays”, ATMs not functioning, etc.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:58 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Hey new to forum from WI

August 2, 2017 IceFire 0

Welcome, prep38!

As to your question regarding PMs, I think it is only prudent to have some as part of your preps. First, make sure you have food/water, essential supplies, etc. I feel that PMs should be part of your financial preps. Do your best to pay down/eliminate debt, have several months’ worth of living expenses saved up, and invest in PMs–NOT PMs on paper…have the physical stuff that YOU control.

For me, personally, I prefer to have my “savings” where I have immediate access. I keep enough in the bank to handle monthly expenses, and keep the rest “elsewhere”, where I don’t have to worry about “bank holidays”, ATMs not functioning, etc.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:58 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 1, 2017 sageprice 0
daaswampman wrote:
The very rich did not comply and many shipped there gold overseas. That is why collectors can still buy antique U.S. gold coins in uncirculated condition today at modest prices! I wish the skeptics could visit Dubai and see how gold works. Dubai is now among a handful of cities, that the worlds elite are flocking too.

When the dollar starts to flop, gold will skyrocket as trillions of fiat dollars chase real wealth. Foolish people will accept those dollars as old habits die hard and they will still see dollars as wealth. There will literally be gold buyers on every corner. The world is not limited to America, our dollar, or our inflated ego!

A good example is what is happened in Iran. During their wars with ISIS etc., the pickers are making a fortune on the antiquities flowing out the country and they pay in gold. It is always the same and there will always be people with money and those who what more.

I dare anyone to show me a single documented time – in all of human history, when there was not a market for gold. It is nothing more than a poor persons fantasy, that we are all be equal and will starve together. Don’t resent it – use it to your own advantage! What will the people with resources need and want? Swamp

Swamp, Gold is only a medium to trade. All the rest are credit currency and have no real value. Yes, there will be a market some where, but getting it there is another story. Brazilian miners only get 1/2 the value on the world market. So here is the point. You Have GOLD, I have gas. What are you going to trade me to take you and your gold to some place to trade your gold. No one else has gas and gold is heavy. WHERE are you going to sell it and HOW are you going to get it there? Remember you are at your remote BOL and there are miles of criminals before you sell and what curency will you accept.

Statistics: Posted by sageprice — Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:23 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 1, 2017 sageprice 0
daaswampman wrote:
The very rich did not comply and many shipped there gold overseas. That is why collectors can still buy antique U.S. gold coins in uncirculated condition today at modest prices! I wish the skeptics could visit Dubai and see how gold works. Dubai is now among a handful of cities, that the worlds elite are flocking too.

When the dollar starts to flop, gold will skyrocket as trillions of fiat dollars chase real wealth. Foolish people will accept those dollars as old habits die hard and they will still see dollars as wealth. There will literally be gold buyers on every corner. The world is not limited to America, our dollar, or our inflated ego!

A good example is what is happened in Iran. During their wars with ISIS etc., the pickers are making a fortune on the antiquities flowing out the country and they pay in gold. It is always the same and there will always be people with money and those who what more.

I dare anyone to show me a single documented time – in all of human history, when there was not a market for gold. It is nothing more than a poor persons fantasy, that we are all be equal and will starve together. Don’t resent it – use it to your own advantage! What will the people with resources need and want? Swamp

Swamp, Gold is only a medium to trade. All the rest are credit currency and have no real value. Yes, there will be a market some where, but getting it there is another story. Brazilian miners only get 1/2 the value on the world market. So here is the point. You Have GOLD, I have gas. What are you going to trade me to take you and your gold to some place to trade your gold. No one else has gas and gold is heavy. WHERE are you going to sell it and HOW are you going to get it there? Remember you are at your remote BOL and there are miles of criminals before you sell and what curency will you accept.

Statistics: Posted by sageprice — Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:23 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea carries out ‘unprecedented’ test of submarine missile system
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08 … ce-highly/

(VIDEOS at link, above)

Julian Ryall
1 August 2017 • 7:13am

The US military is monitoring “highly unusual and unprecedented levels” of activity by North Korea’s submarine force, with reports of a series of successful “ejection tests” of submarine-launched ballistic missiles described by analysts as a “critical step forward”.

Three ejection tests were carried out on land at Sinpo Naval Shipyard in July alone, US officials told CNN. A further test was carried out at the base, which is the headquarters of the Maritime Research Institute of North Korea’s Academy of National Defence Science, earlier in the year.

The report comes after North Korea’s latest test of an intercontinental ballistic missile has shown that Pyongyang now may be able to reach most of the continental United States.

An ejection test is designed to test the cold-launch system required to propel a missile away from its launch tube on the submarine before the engine ignites, protecting the submarine.

The ground-based tests also coincide with a North Korean Romeo-class submarine carrying out “unusual activities” off the east coast of the peninsula for at least one week in late July.

The US and South Korea monitored the activities of the 1,800-ton diesel vessel, which is armed with 14 torpedoes and up to 20 mines. The submarine travelled more than 60 miles from the North Korean coast and into international waters, something which no submarine has been observed doing previously.

Analysts at the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University suggested there are a number of possible explanations, although the “most likely is preparations for a test in the near future of an updated Pukguksong-1 submarine-launched ballistic missile or a potentially newer system”.

North Korea first successfully launched an SLBM in August 2016, with the weapon traveling more than 300 miles. Pyongyang is believed to want to be able to deploy a missile-capable submarine into the Pacific Ocean as an additional threat to the United States.

“Achieving a successful cold-launch ejection test, even from land-based tubes, is a critical step forward in making an operational missile”, said Lance Gatling, a defence analyst and president of Tokyo-based Nexial Research Inc.

“The whole point of putting missiles into a stealthy platform like a submarine is to achieve tactical surprise, and this moves closer to that”, he told The Telegraph.

The biggest problem for the North Koreans, however, is its “antiquated” and extremely noisy submarines, which make it relatively easy for US, South Korean and Japanese assets to monitor their activities, Gatling said.

North Korea is believed to have a fleet of around 70 submarines, although virtually all are obsolescent or small coastal vessels designed to infiltrate agents into the South.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:00 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea carries out ‘unprecedented’ test of submarine missile system
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08 … ce-highly/

(VIDEOS at link, above)

Julian Ryall
1 August 2017 • 7:13am

The US military is monitoring “highly unusual and unprecedented levels” of activity by North Korea’s submarine force, with reports of a series of successful “ejection tests” of submarine-launched ballistic missiles described by analysts as a “critical step forward”.

Three ejection tests were carried out on land at Sinpo Naval Shipyard in July alone, US officials told CNN. A further test was carried out at the base, which is the headquarters of the Maritime Research Institute of North Korea’s Academy of National Defence Science, earlier in the year.

The report comes after North Korea’s latest test of an intercontinental ballistic missile has shown that Pyongyang now may be able to reach most of the continental United States.

An ejection test is designed to test the cold-launch system required to propel a missile away from its launch tube on the submarine before the engine ignites, protecting the submarine.

The ground-based tests also coincide with a North Korean Romeo-class submarine carrying out “unusual activities” off the east coast of the peninsula for at least one week in late July.

The US and South Korea monitored the activities of the 1,800-ton diesel vessel, which is armed with 14 torpedoes and up to 20 mines. The submarine travelled more than 60 miles from the North Korean coast and into international waters, something which no submarine has been observed doing previously.

Analysts at the US-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University suggested there are a number of possible explanations, although the “most likely is preparations for a test in the near future of an updated Pukguksong-1 submarine-launched ballistic missile or a potentially newer system”.

North Korea first successfully launched an SLBM in August 2016, with the weapon traveling more than 300 miles. Pyongyang is believed to want to be able to deploy a missile-capable submarine into the Pacific Ocean as an additional threat to the United States.

“Achieving a successful cold-launch ejection test, even from land-based tubes, is a critical step forward in making an operational missile”, said Lance Gatling, a defence analyst and president of Tokyo-based Nexial Research Inc.

“The whole point of putting missiles into a stealthy platform like a submarine is to achieve tactical surprise, and this moves closer to that”, he told The Telegraph.

The biggest problem for the North Koreans, however, is its “antiquated” and extremely noisy submarines, which make it relatively easy for US, South Korean and Japanese assets to monitor their activities, Gatling said.

North Korea is believed to have a fleet of around 70 submarines, although virtually all are obsolescent or small coastal vessels designed to infiltrate agents into the South.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:00 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Ugh! Now it’s SUBMARINES, too! :bored:

The U.S. Military Has Detected ‘Highly Unusual’ North Korean Submarine Activity
http://time.com/4881840/north-korea-submarine-missile/

Joseph Hincks Jul 31, 2017

North Korea has been engaged in “highly unusual and unprecedented levels” of submarine activity in the wake of its second intercontinental ballistic missile launch this month, according to analysis by the U.S. military.

Speaking with CNN, an unnamed U.S. defense official said Monday the military also detected evidence of an “ejection test” Sunday at the Sinpo Naval Shipyard on the country’s eastern seaboard. Sinpo functions as a center of North Korea’s submarine-launched ballistic missile program.

Ejection tests like Sunday’s — of which CNN says there have been four this year, three in July alone — test the efficacy of a launch component critical to developing submarine missile launch capability. According to U.S. intelligence assessments, Pyongyang’s submarine fleet comprises about 70 subs, but few are thought to be new or sophisticated enough to fire missiles and the submarine-based launch program is still in its nascent stages.

Earlier in July CNN reported that one of the older class of North Korean subs, a Romeo, had sailed some 62 miles out to sea in international waters. The U.S. and South Korea slightly raised their alert level in response to its unusual deployment and range.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:57 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #5 (Aug 2017)

August 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Ugh! Now it’s SUBMARINES, too! :bored:

The U.S. Military Has Detected ‘Highly Unusual’ North Korean Submarine Activity
http://time.com/4881840/north-korea-submarine-missile/

Joseph Hincks Jul 31, 2017

North Korea has been engaged in “highly unusual and unprecedented levels” of submarine activity in the wake of its second intercontinental ballistic missile launch this month, according to analysis by the U.S. military.

Speaking with CNN, an unnamed U.S. defense official said Monday the military also detected evidence of an “ejection test” Sunday at the Sinpo Naval Shipyard on the country’s eastern seaboard. Sinpo functions as a center of North Korea’s submarine-launched ballistic missile program.

Ejection tests like Sunday’s — of which CNN says there have been four this year, three in July alone — test the efficacy of a launch component critical to developing submarine missile launch capability. According to U.S. intelligence assessments, Pyongyang’s submarine fleet comprises about 70 subs, but few are thought to be new or sophisticated enough to fire missiles and the submarine-based launch program is still in its nascent stages.

Earlier in July CNN reported that one of the older class of North Korean subs, a Romeo, had sailed some 62 miles out to sea in international waters. The U.S. and South Korea slightly raised their alert level in response to its unusual deployment and range.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:57 pm


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Other weapons • Re: SOG Tomahawk

August 1, 2017 Mountain 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
Try that Ferro cerium rod yet?

That looked to break a few timeS…..careful with it….

(lol…JuSt noticed my lower caSe “S” iS not working on my keyboard for Some reason….weird. I have to uSe capS for it to appear without opening a window like itS been assigned aS Some Sort of hotkey for opening a HP Support Window for my chipSet …. Great…. this iS going to be fun…lol)

Oh heck yes this rod will break. There’s a you tube video on it.
I’ve used it 3 times without breaking it
The ferro rod is a nice touch/gimmick, but I definitely didn’t buy this Hawk because it had a .25 cent Rambo fire starter in it. :-). I would have preferred some kind of sharpening steel instead. Oh well when I’m in charge at SOG there’s going to be some big changes. :gunshooting:

Statistics: Posted by Mountain — Tue Aug 01, 2017 2:04 pm


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Other weapons • Re: SOG Tomahawk

August 1, 2017 Mountain 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
Try that Ferro cerium rod yet?

That looked to break a few timeS…..careful with it….

(lol…JuSt noticed my lower caSe “S” iS not working on my keyboard for Some reason….weird. I have to uSe capS for it to appear without opening a window like itS been assigned aS Some Sort of hotkey for opening a HP Support Window for my chipSet …. Great…. this iS going to be fun…lol)

Oh heck yes this rod will break. There’s a you tube video on it.
I’ve used it 3 times without breaking it
The ferro rod is a nice touch/gimmick, but I definitely didn’t buy this Hawk because it had a .25 cent Rambo fire starter in it. :-). I would have preferred some kind of sharpening steel instead. Oh well when I’m in charge at SOG there’s going to be some big changes. :gunshooting:

Statistics: Posted by Mountain — Tue Aug 01, 2017 2:04 pm