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Food & Water • Re: Ghee???

March 13, 2017 anita 0

Ghee really seems to be increasing in popularity. A few years ago I only saw it in Wegman’s. Now I see several varieties in the local grocery.

It has a higher burn point because the dairy solids are removed. (As memory serves me, butter has about 80% fat.)

I’ve purchased some and have it in my stores, but I haven’t used it.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:45 pm


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Food & Water • Re: Ghee???

March 13, 2017 anita 0

Ghee really seems to be increasing in popularity. A few years ago I only saw it in Wegman’s. Now I see several varieties in the local grocery.

It has a higher burn point because the dairy solids are removed. (As memory serves me, butter has about 80% fat.)

I’ve purchased some and have it in my stores, but I haven’t used it.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:45 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MARCH 2017 – What Did You do To Prep This Week/Month?

March 13, 2017 kenjabroni 0

Made a composting bin out of some recycled pallets. 7 feet long by 4 feet deep. Its two boxes divided in half. I really dont have a huge amount of knowledge with them just know to add the stuff turn it and water it…….guess we will see. Got the metal frame from a 10×10 dog kennel and im going to repurpose it into a green house. I will have to frame the roof and put some framework up for the walls to attach the plastic to but I think its going to turn out pretty good. Made the wife a GHB. Shes going on a long road trip. Did what I could do to give her a chance just in case.

Statistics: Posted by kenjabroni — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:26 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MARCH 2017 – What Did You do To Prep This Week/Month?

March 13, 2017 kenjabroni 0

Made a composting bin out of some recycled pallets. 7 feet long by 4 feet deep. Its two boxes divided in half. I really dont have a huge amount of knowledge with them just know to add the stuff turn it and water it…….guess we will see. Got the metal frame from a 10×10 dog kennel and im going to repurpose it into a green house. I will have to frame the roof and put some framework up for the walls to attach the plastic to but I think its going to turn out pretty good. Made the wife a GHB. Shes going on a long road trip. Did what I could do to give her a chance just in case.

Statistics: Posted by kenjabroni — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:26 pm


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Food & Water • Ghee???

March 13, 2017 Murby 0

Anyone? Opinions?

Its called “Clarified Butter” and has a ridiculously long shelf life..

Does it really taste like butter?

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:20 pm


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Food & Water • Ghee???

March 13, 2017 Murby 0

Anyone? Opinions?

Its called “Clarified Butter” and has a ridiculously long shelf life..

Does it really taste like butter?

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:20 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MARCH 2017 – What Did You do To Prep This Week/Month?

March 13, 2017 IceFire 0

Between yesterday and today, we got the wood added to the framing of the greenhouses–we started with 2 6×8 greenhouses, and are turning them into one 6×19 1/2 greenhouse. Also got the roofing mostly done on the one–replacement for the one that got blown away and damaged by the wind. Fortunately, after removing the roofing (lattice and polycarbonate panels) and lattice around the sides, we were able to straighten out the frame enough that we will be able to re-use it. Still need to put the roof ridge cap on, and roof over the “gap” between the two section. We did add some framing to the back of the gap, and framed in a doorway in the front (I’ll need to build a door for that.) Still need to “wrap” around the sides and ends–I have 5 mil thick ag plastic for that, so it will just be a matter of using the staple gun and stapling the ag plastic to the wood.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:18 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MARCH 2017 – What Did You do To Prep This Week/Month?

March 13, 2017 IceFire 0

Between yesterday and today, we got the wood added to the framing of the greenhouses–we started with 2 6×8 greenhouses, and are turning them into one 6×19 1/2 greenhouse. Also got the roofing mostly done on the one–replacement for the one that got blown away and damaged by the wind. Fortunately, after removing the roofing (lattice and polycarbonate panels) and lattice around the sides, we were able to straighten out the frame enough that we will be able to re-use it. Still need to put the roof ridge cap on, and roof over the “gap” between the two section. We did add some framing to the back of the gap, and framed in a doorway in the front (I’ll need to build a door for that.) Still need to “wrap” around the sides and ends–I have 5 mil thick ag plastic for that, so it will just be a matter of using the staple gun and stapling the ag plastic to the wood.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:18 pm


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Check In Here Delaware Preppers • Re: New to this forum hopefully not alone

March 13, 2017 anita 0
rebnavy1862 wrote:

anita wrote:

oldasrocks wrote:Anita seems to prefer shiny lace evidently. Bright bold colors. Goes well with her auburn hair and blue eyes.

Sorry, brown going gray, and green. Old sweatshirt, leggings, sneakers. Move along!

Your hair is going gray and green :?:?:shock:
Reb

It’s the witchy look, Reb.

Actually my hair is brown, trending gray, and my eyes are green.

Rocks got it, but I guess you’re still suffering from the aftereffects of your illness. ๐Ÿ™‚

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:17 pm


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Check In Here Delaware Preppers • Re: New to this forum hopefully not alone

March 13, 2017 anita 0
rebnavy1862 wrote:

anita wrote:

oldasrocks wrote:Anita seems to prefer shiny lace evidently. Bright bold colors. Goes well with her auburn hair and blue eyes.

Sorry, brown going gray, and green. Old sweatshirt, leggings, sneakers. Move along!

Your hair is going gray and green :?:?:shock:
Reb

It’s the witchy look, Reb.

Actually my hair is brown, trending gray, and my eyes are green.

Rocks got it, but I guess you’re still suffering from the aftereffects of your illness. ๐Ÿ™‚

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Mar 12, 2017 8:17 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 Blondie 0

I have to check with the twp to see what permits may be required.

I only want to clear an acre so I can get my bearings as to what I want to do eventually. I know the timber may not be worth much and I just may end up with a big supply of firewood so I’m not expecting to make $$.

This is beyond what I can accomplish without paid contractors.

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sun Mar 12, 2017 5:12 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 Blondie 0

I have to check with the twp to see what permits may be required.

I only want to clear an acre so I can get my bearings as to what I want to do eventually. I know the timber may not be worth much and I just may end up with a big supply of firewood so I’m not expecting to make $$.

This is beyond what I can accomplish without paid contractors.

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sun Mar 12, 2017 5:12 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 JayJay 0

Scrap your idea.
(1)From 40+ years of experience married to a logger, one acre ain’t enough for a professional logger to mess with…remember, they have to haul all that equipment from their location.
(2)Go to Lowe’s for your lumber.

Note: Logger of 40+ years agreed with my post.

(((I choose the amish mill for dollar value and time to cut it, they gave me more money and did it in half the time)))
Note: around here, those mills are family-owned. They don’t have labor to worry about. Experience.
Amish mill owner friend and associate of my husband log buyer.

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Sun Mar 12, 2017 1:13 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 JayJay 0

Scrap your idea.
(1)From 40+ years of experience married to a logger, one acre ain’t enough for a professional logger to mess with…remember, they have to haul all that equipment from their location.
(2)Go to Lowe’s for your lumber.

Note: Logger of 40+ years agreed with my post.

(((I choose the amish mill for dollar value and time to cut it, they gave me more money and did it in half the time)))
Note: around here, those mills are family-owned. They don’t have labor to worry about. Experience.
Amish mill owner friend and associate of my husband log buyer.

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Sun Mar 12, 2017 1:13 pm


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Check In Here Delaware Preppers • Re: New to this forum hopefully not alone

March 12, 2017 oldasrocks 0
anita wrote:

oldasrocks wrote:Anita seems to prefer shiny lace evidently. Bright bold colors. Goes well with her auburn hair and blue eyes.

Sorry, brown going gray, and green. Old sweatshirt, leggings, sneakers. Move along!

Must be looking at the wrong address. Look on the bright side. If Swamp comes looking for you he will not find you, LOL.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Sun Mar 12, 2017 12:39 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 angie_nrs 0

I think you’d be much better off just buying the lumber than trying to use your own. It’s probably going to be cheaper and you’ll run into way less problems. As mentioned, to meet code, you will need the stamped lumber, which your own wood won’t have. I agree that the white pine is structurally not very strong and therefore not typically used for framing. However, it would make nice paneling that you could use inside.

Something you might want to consider is having a forester give you an estimate on your property if you have a decent sized parcel. Not clear cut, but select cut. I’d definitely get a second opinion before agreeing to the cut. I’m familiar with the markets up here and right now the markets are not good, although the market for white pine is fairly steady…..unfortunately it’s just not that valuable. If you have popular or hard maple it might be worth it to wait the markets out. Most buyers are not going to bother looking at anything less than 10 acres as it’s just not worth the effort on their part to move all the equipment. Some smaller (hand cut) loggers might be interested but definitely do your research on them. Call local mills and truckers for their opinions, and look at past jobs they have done so you don’t get fleeced. I know of a few that I would never allow to set foot on my property.

If you’re only interested in clearing an acre, you’re best bet is to hire an excavator to do the work and ask them to set the logs aside. You could then hire someone with a portable sawmill to come out and cut it, depending upon how much they charge. But then you’d have to have it dried and processed. I would recommend that if you have a way to transport it to a mill, you should go that route so they can cut and dry it for you and also turn it into paneling. That way you drop it off, they do the work, and you pick it up ready to go. Again you’d have to do your own cost analysis to see if it is worth it. You might have more money and trouble into it than it’s worth. Sometimes the easiest thing to do is ask the excavator if they are interested in buying it on site or contact a local mill or trucker to see if they will buy it where it sits. There’s likely not going to be much there with only an acre cut though…..but it depends on the specific piece of property.

Most of the time people overestimate the value of their wood. That said, the only way to know for sure is to contact someone who can give you an honest estimate.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Sun Mar 12, 2017 12:34 pm


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Emergency Communications • Built two roll up J pole antennas yesterday

March 12, 2017 orangetom1999 0

Was intending to re adjust my long wire..Loop antenna for HF bands yesterday but got sidetracked and wound up fabricating two roll up J pole antennas to replace the ones I had given away to new hams who had no external antennas and were using Walkie talkies in their apartments’/homes.

It worked out to be a starter antenna to help them get out and receive better.

I made my antennas out of 300 ohm twin lead…that olde type flat line television antenna wire and also sometimes you would see it as FM stereo wire.

It is fed with RG 8 mini coaxial antenna wire.

The first one I made as strictly a 2 meter J pole tuned in the 144-148 MHZ band and it tuned up well.

I have been meaning to try a twin lead J pole for a dual band purpose ..2 meter and 70 CM…or what also called the 440 MHZ band.

I followed the instructions on U Tube and it worked out well. It is only a few different but critical differences verses the 2 meter only antenna.

Both antennas were able to get into local repeaters..from a height of only 8 feet above the ground.

Here is a photo of the 2 meter only antenna. Going to have a go later on today in adjusting my long wire loop for the HF bands.

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And here is a photo of the same roll up antenna inserted into a PVC tube for more permanent outdoor set up.

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Thanks,
Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Sun Mar 12, 2017 11:39 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 anita 0

My father had some timber (cherry) harvested on his farm years ago, I know he chose the trees, but beyond that I don’t know much.

However, I’m just throwing out a word of caution. In my area you are only permitted to cut a certain percentage of trees down, and only those smaller than a certain circumference. I’m sure this isn’t the case everywhere, but just make sure you know what the local laws are. Someone in this area cut down a number of trees on their property (after purchasing it) and got a fairly large fine. I was speaking to someone in my county, but a half hour from here, and he said there was no regulation in his township about taking down trees.

I know, stupid, but it’s important to know what the local rules are so you don’t get caught.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Mar 12, 2017 11:37 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 Fullmoon 0

As a general rule, white pine isn’t used for framing materials. Douglas fir is the standard for structural members with Sitka Spruce coming in second. Doug fir is more flexible and will carry more weight. Framing lumber is supposed to be green when a structure is being built. If you dry it you can’t nail the members together without the wood splitting and you will bend lots of nails trying to frame with dried wood. Dried lumber has a tendency to warp and twist making assembly harder. After assembly, green framing members will dry out over time and take a set and remain stable. Hardwoods need to be cured for cabinet making, stair treads etc. Moisture content in kiln dried lumber should be 10 to 12%. Most local building codes and inspectors will want to see a lumber grade stamp on all framing materials and sheet stock. Framing materials must be graded and stamped as number 2 or better to pass inspection. You might want to check with your U.P. county building code for specs and whether or not you can use your home grown lumber. A shed or outbuilding may be OK to build with home sawn timber but any building for human occupation must be built to code with approved lumber. A portable Wood Mizer band saw or a Mobile Dimension circular saw can be towed into your property very easily, set up, and your sawn lumber will be inexpensively cut to whatever dimension you want, usually up to 24′ lengths. The leftover cants and scraps can be cut into firewood for your woodstove. The band saws cut a narrower kerf leaving less saw dust to clean up and being more efficient. I just paid $340 per thousand board feet to a Mobile Dimension saw operator to mill some 1×12 fir siding and it came out beautiful, clear wood with no knots, a number one clear grade lumber. Here in Oregon this is a common practice. I have built houses in remote locations using materials sawn on site. Had a 6×16″ ridge beam cut from a large diameter fir tree. After the owner moved in, a pitch pocket started dripping sticky pitch onto his coffee table, contaminating his beer mug and changing the flavor of his favorite brew. This continued for over a year so a better tree should have been used to eliminate this unforeseen problem.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Sun Mar 12, 2017 11:25 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 Blondie 0

Thanks guys!

Rickdun, I think there is an Amish sawmill nearby. Therd’s a cabinet maker, furniture builder and two homebuilders in their community here so I’m betting on a sawmill here. I agree, it’s my first choice. I don’t need boards for awhile. Deal han’t closed so I’m in the planning stages.

Ajax, I read about portable sawmills and I’ll ask if that’s an option since it’s only an acre and the logs don’t have to be moved far. I know cut timber shouldn’t sit long and I has to be dried properly.

My thought is if there isn’t enough suitable framing timber (whitre pine is soft) that I could negotiate for framing boards they already have,

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sun Mar 12, 2017 10:16 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 ajax727 0

Ask around to see if someone in the area has a portable sawmill , if you find one they will come to you and saw what you want . Is the track hardwood oaks and such or softwood pine and such .
Or you could buy a small band mill yourself new or used cut up the timber like you want and then just sell the band mill .
The timber would still have to be stacked correctly air dried or kiln dried . you also can buy a small planner use it and then resell it .
I owned a sawmill for 18 years and worked at one from 1967 on and off till 1999 .

Statistics: Posted by ajax727 — Sun Mar 12, 2017 9:50 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 rickdun 0
Blondie wrote:
After much searching I finally found a parcel of land that’s manageable & affordable for me. Looks like the deal should close.

The parcel is heavily forrested, mostly white pines and I want clear about an acre. I need someone who knows what they’re doing but not sure I need a professional forrester for such a small job?

Secondly, is it possible to work a deal with the sawmill where I can get either some of my own boards back or their dried/finished boards in stock for framing?

Is this practical or should I scrap the romantic notion of having my own timber to use for my home, chuck the idea and head for Home Depot?

In waaaayyy over this City Girl’s head.

Blondie, I had timber cut on the farm some 25 years ago this is what I did. I checked with 4 different mills, all small mills, 1 of which was an amish mill. I choose the amish mill for dollar value and time to cut it, they gave me more money and did it in half the time, plus they were more dependable. The amish cut all the timber, made arrangements to have it taken to their mill to cut, etc..

The deal I made with the amish was to give me a price for the lumber (red oak) and then deduct the price for 1500 board feet for me that was cut, for my use to put in my living room.

It was more convient for me as I already had the trees and the middle man was cut out. Now, if you want/need the lumber right now, go to lowes/home depot. It takes time for wood to cure correctly. My lumber I got, I took to another mill to be kiln dried and then four sided planed and tung and grooved, because I wanted it right now to remodel the living room. This was an added expense and would have been cheaper if I went to lowes, but it’s my lumber in my living room with my labor to put it there and nobody can take that away from me and it does put a smile on my face.

It won’t cost you anything but your time to have a lumber company look at it and give you a price for what you have with a deal of keeping some of it. Then if you don’t like the deal, go to lowes/home depot.

OH, and congratulations on you purchase.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Sun Mar 12, 2017 4:31 am


:agree:

Construction Cornerstone • Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 12, 2017 Blondie 0

After much searching I finally found a parcel of land that’s manageable & affordable for me. Looks like the deal should close.

The parcel is heavily forrested, mostly white pines and I want clear about an acre. I need someone who knows what they’re doing but not sure I need a professional forrester for such a small job?

Secondly, is it possible to work a deal with the sawmill where I can get either some of my own boards back or their dried/finished boards in stock for framing?

Is this practical or should I scrap the romantic notion of having my own timber to use for my home, chuck the idea and head for Home Depot?

In waaaayyy over this City Girl’s head.

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sun Mar 12, 2017 2:13 am