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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 15, 2017 Blondie 0

Just wanted to say thanks to angie for the good info should anyone need it.

I did find a listing for the state lumberman’s assn. Good info and some links. One guy buys standing pine for palletts and another guy posted his portable sawmill rates online so I’m hopeful.

Again everybody-thanks much!

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:25 pm


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Ohio Meetups • Three Part Aquaponics Series – Free or cheap – hands on!

March 15, 2017 maustypsu 0

Last year I successfully grew and enjoyed lettuces, string beans, cucumbers and more from a small aquaponics set up fueled by 4 gold fish and less than 5 gallons of water. This year I plan to expand. I am willing to do a series of demo’s at my home for those interested.
First would be “the build” – I would explain the fundamentals and we would build an actual working unit from readily available parts.
Next would be the first planting – I would include how I monitored and adjusted the water to the ideal levels of bacteria and how I will rotate and harvest.
Finally, we’d schedule a tasting for when enough veggies come in for us to make salads – I’d share my experiences from the planting to the harvesting, including rotating, what plants I have harvested, removed b/c of poor health, etc.

If there was enough interest, I would keep a journal throughout the process with some video and photo updates. If there are only one or two folks interested then I can do something much less formal. All of that can be free for up to 20 people… (this is cross posted)

I’m also considering limiting to 12 and charging $25 total for the three events – just $8.33/ meetup. That w Then I could provide a meal cooked over a fire, print nice color hand outs or other amenities. Or $50 per person and you leave with your own Aquaponics system. We would use my tools and materials to build the 5 gallon version complete except the water pump which will run you $25-40.

Either would cover 3 meet ups, hands on building two different sized Aquaponics set ups, food, friends, etc… the extra $25 pays for the materials for your system which I would buy, cut and prepare for us to assemble together. All of the money will be spent on the events, I will not benefit financially from this. But would love to share the experience, even if I fail this year for some reason we can all learn from it.

For those interested, What are your thoughts? Do you prefer to bring a dish to share each time or go every person for themselves? Or share the expenses and I will put together a nice spread for each meet up with a few small extras? Or would it be best to go all in and spend the $50… have some BBQ each meet up, maybe a prize or two and end the series with your own set up that can be growing lettuce this fall? I planted a cumber in AUGUST last year. It grew so fast that its root ball was so large it made it hard to remove lettuces! And at one point we had so many cucumbers that we had a few rot on the vine. That plant required just 2″ of “ground space”… Really cool stuff, all!!!

Statistics: Posted by maustypsu — Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:01 pm


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Ohio Meetups • Three Part Aquaponics Series – Free or cheap – hands on!

March 15, 2017 maustypsu 0

Last year I successfully grew and enjoyed lettuces, string beans, cucumbers and more from a small aquaponics set up fueled by 4 gold fish and less than 5 gallons of water. This year I plan to expand. I am willing to do a series of demo’s at my home for those interested.
First would be “the build” – I would explain the fundamentals and we would build an actual working unit from readily available parts.
Next would be the first planting – I would include how I monitored and adjusted the water to the ideal levels of bacteria and how I will rotate and harvest.
Finally, we’d schedule a tasting for when enough veggies come in for us to make salads – I’d share my experiences from the planting to the harvesting, including rotating, what plants I have harvested, removed b/c of poor health, etc.

If there was enough interest, I would keep a journal throughout the process with some video and photo updates. If there are only one or two folks interested then I can do something much less formal. All of that can be free for up to 20 people… (this is cross posted)

I’m also considering limiting to 12 and charging $25 total for the three events – just $8.33/ meetup. That w Then I could provide a meal cooked over a fire, print nice color hand outs or other amenities. Or $50 per person and you leave with your own Aquaponics system. We would use my tools and materials to build the 5 gallon version complete except the water pump which will run you $25-40.

Either would cover 3 meet ups, hands on building two different sized Aquaponics set ups, food, friends, etc… the extra $25 pays for the materials for your system which I would buy, cut and prepare for us to assemble together. All of the money will be spent on the events, I will not benefit financially from this. But would love to share the experience, even if I fail this year for some reason we can all learn from it.

For those interested, What are your thoughts? Do you prefer to bring a dish to share each time or go every person for themselves? Or share the expenses and I will put together a nice spread for each meet up with a few small extras? Or would it be best to go all in and spend the $50… have some BBQ each meet up, maybe a prize or two and end the series with your own set up that can be growing lettuce this fall? I planted a cumber in AUGUST last year. It grew so fast that its root ball was so large it made it hard to remove lettuces! And at one point we had so many cucumbers that we had a few rot on the vine. That plant required just 2″ of “ground space”… Really cool stuff, all!!!

Statistics: Posted by maustypsu — Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:01 pm


General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MARCH 2017 – What Did You do To Prep This Week/Month?

March 14, 2017 Cin 0

We’ve had some cold, below freezing weather and have been staying in playing ont eh computer, reading and watching documentaries (we don’t have satellite or cable now).

I decided to roast a chicken yesterday and then threw the bones and some veggies in a crockpot to make bone broth.

I’ve never made it before, heard it was very nutritious, so since I had the ingredients, I tried it.

I put it in pint jars in the fridge so the fat will rise to the top and will try it tomorrow. Hope I like it – it seemed real easy.

If it turns out well, I’ll try it with beef bones, too.

Packed up some stuff for the thrift shop in the continuing de-clutter of spaces for more preps.

Cleaned out the foyer closet and put our EDC bags in there (we did have them in our bedroom) – we don’t leave them in the car because of mice. We just take them as we leave each time and toss them in the back.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Tue Mar 14, 2017 6:06 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MARCH 2017 – What Did You do To Prep This Week/Month?

March 14, 2017 Cin 0

We’ve had some cold, below freezing weather and have been staying in playing ont eh computer, reading and watching documentaries (we don’t have satellite or cable now).

I decided to roast a chicken yesterday and then threw the bones and some veggies in a crockpot to make bone broth.

I’ve never made it before, heard it was very nutritious, so since I had the ingredients, I tried it.

I put it in pint jars in the fridge so the fat will rise to the top and will try it tomorrow. Hope I like it – it seemed real easy.

If it turns out well, I’ll try it with beef bones, too.

Packed up some stuff for the thrift shop in the continuing de-clutter of spaces for more preps.

Cleaned out the foyer closet and put our EDC bags in there (we did have them in our bedroom) – we don’t leave them in the car because of mice. We just take them as we leave each time and toss them in the back.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Tue Mar 14, 2017 6:06 pm


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Pennsylvania Discussion, News and Weather • Re: PA: Blizzard on the Way! Ugh!

March 14, 2017 rickdun 0

We only got about 5″ but it’s snowing and blowing now, I think they call it a wrap around plus we’re getting snow off lake erie now.

They’re calling for another 3″ to 5″ over night, it’s 18 degrees, 20 mph winds, wind chill -2 degrees, winds out of the northwest. We didn’t get as much as they were calling for.

Throw another log on the fire and pop a top.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:52 pm


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Pennsylvania Discussion, News and Weather • Re: PA: Blizzard on the Way! Ugh!

March 14, 2017 rickdun 0

We only got about 5″ but it’s snowing and blowing now, I think they call it a wrap around plus we’re getting snow off lake erie now.

They’re calling for another 3″ to 5″ over night, it’s 18 degrees, 20 mph winds, wind chill -2 degrees, winds out of the northwest. We didn’t get as much as they were calling for.

Throw another log on the fire and pop a top.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:52 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Hello, from East Texas!

March 14, 2017 EastTexas 0

I Am a Prepper.jpgHi, I am an ‘older’, single, lady who retired from teaching a few years ago and have decided to sell my home, etc on the hot coast of Texas and move back to my birthplace… the piney woods of E. Texas. I am looking for land now and plan to buy within a couple of months. I’m hoping to find others in that area who like the homesteading, prepping lifestyle I could get to know. Also, I would like to share a meme that I saw and saved to my pc a few months ago, but in case you haven’t seen it, it sums up my feelings about the prepping lifestyle.

Statistics: Posted by EastTexas — Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:08 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Hello, from East Texas!

March 14, 2017 EastTexas 0

I Am a Prepper.jpgHi, I am an ‘older’, single, lady who retired from teaching a few years ago and have decided to sell my home, etc on the hot coast of Texas and move back to my birthplace… the piney woods of E. Texas. I am looking for land now and plan to buy within a couple of months. I’m hoping to find others in that area who like the homesteading, prepping lifestyle I could get to know. Also, I would like to share a meme that I saw and saved to my pc a few months ago, but in case you haven’t seen it, it sums up my feelings about the prepping lifestyle.

Statistics: Posted by EastTexas — Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:08 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
BK in KC wrote:

Photon Guy wrote:Bummer. Before we know it a Python from back in the day will be close to the cost of an M-16 from pre 1986. Too bad we have to suffer from Colt’s mistakes.

It’s a shame but Colt did it to themselves. Don’t ignore consumers because government contracts can be fickle. I think the best we can hope for is that Colt sells the rights to the Python name and design to a company like Cabot who are known for high quality custom craftsmanship. Of course they’d end up costing something like $3000 or more but the quality would be first-rate.

I agree that we might be best off if Colt sells the name and the blueprints to another company such as the one you mentioned, Cabot. $3000 isn’t all that much if you’re buying from Cabot, often their guns will go for four or five grand. As it is, a Python today will easily cost upwards of $3000 especially if its never been fired. I suppose Colt did not anticipate the TV series Walking Dead from which they would’ve made a ton of profit selling Pythons. After the movie Dirty Harry came out the Smith & Wesson 29 was in huge demand an there were lots of sales.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 4:00 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
BK in KC wrote:

Photon Guy wrote:Bummer. Before we know it a Python from back in the day will be close to the cost of an M-16 from pre 1986. Too bad we have to suffer from Colt’s mistakes.

It’s a shame but Colt did it to themselves. Don’t ignore consumers because government contracts can be fickle. I think the best we can hope for is that Colt sells the rights to the Python name and design to a company like Cabot who are known for high quality custom craftsmanship. Of course they’d end up costing something like $3000 or more but the quality would be first-rate.

I agree that we might be best off if Colt sells the name and the blueprints to another company such as the one you mentioned, Cabot. $3000 isn’t all that much if you’re buying from Cabot, often their guns will go for four or five grand. As it is, a Python today will easily cost upwards of $3000 especially if its never been fired. I suppose Colt did not anticipate the TV series Walking Dead from which they would’ve made a ton of profit selling Pythons. After the movie Dirty Harry came out the Smith & Wesson 29 was in huge demand an there were lots of sales.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 4:00 pm


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Photon Guy wrote:
In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

I live in a rural area.

Formal firearms training does require some travel.
Sig Academy is not far from me comparatively to, say, Gunsite.

Training in rural areas is not hard at all. If you have the land, set up your own course of fire. Does not have to be full on NRA High-Power, across the course, but the use of reduced sized targets, using .22LR rather than full power is just as effective.
Having mastery of the fundamentals is what marksmanship is.
Then apply some of COL Jeff Cooper’s drills to improve. Start slow but smooth at first. With time comes speed.

There are several martial arts school within thirty minutes of me.
Unfortunately, none are Krav Maga.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:29 pm


Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Photon Guy wrote:
In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

I live in a rural area.

Formal firearms training does require some travel.
Sig Academy is not far from me comparatively to, say, Gunsite.

Training in rural areas is not hard at all. If you have the land, set up your own course of fire. Does not have to be full on NRA High-Power, across the course, but the use of reduced sized targets, using .22LR rather than full power is just as effective.
Having mastery of the fundamentals is what marksmanship is.
Then apply some of COL Jeff Cooper’s drills to improve. Start slow but smooth at first. With time comes speed.

There are several martial arts school within thirty minutes of me.
Unfortunately, none are Krav Maga.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:29 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 BK in KC 0
Photon Guy wrote:
Bummer. Before we know it a Python from back in the day will be close to the cost of an M-16 from pre 1986. Too bad we have to suffer from Colt’s mistakes.

It’s a shame but Colt did it to themselves. Don’t ignore consumers because government contracts can be fickle. I think the best we can hope for is that Colt sells the rights to the Python name and design to a company like Cabot who are known for high quality custom craftsmanship. Of course they’d end up costing something like $3000 or more but the quality would be first-rate.

Statistics: Posted by BK in KC — Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:02 pm


No Image

Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 BK in KC 0
Photon Guy wrote:
Bummer. Before we know it a Python from back in the day will be close to the cost of an M-16 from pre 1986. Too bad we have to suffer from Colt’s mistakes.

It’s a shame but Colt did it to themselves. Don’t ignore consumers because government contracts can be fickle. I think the best we can hope for is that Colt sells the rights to the Python name and design to a company like Cabot who are known for high quality custom craftsmanship. Of course they’d end up costing something like $3000 or more but the quality would be first-rate.

Statistics: Posted by BK in KC — Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:02 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 14, 2017 angie_nrs 0

The following comments do not address the OP’s original post, but I wanted to add a few things for anyone who stumbles on this thread later as it is a good topic.

Here’s a few recommendations for anyone planning on selling their standing timber.

Definitely get at least 3 timber buyers to come and look at your property. Don’t automatically go with the buyer that gives you the highest price. If you do, you may regret it. Do your homework if you don’t want to get fleeced. How long has this buyer been in business? Do they have proofs of insurance (liability and work comp) that their insurance company can send you? Do they do a proper cleanup…..do they cut the tops or chip the tops? Can you see the last 3 jobs they have done? Do they have recommendations or can you talk to the owners of the last 3 jobs? Do they own their own equipment? Are they SFI (sustainable forestry) certified? Will they market all the wood or just certain species or types? What will they pay you for each type? Ask them if waiting for your timber to mature or for the markets to bounce back is a good idea. A reputable forester may very well tell you it’s best to wait a few years.

The reason I say to have their insurance company send the insurance proofs is that there have been crooks that white out the expiration dates and enter their own and then send you copies of their “fake” proofs. If it comes directly from the insurance company it will be valid. A reputable logger/forester will have no problem having their insurance company send you proofs. Note that Amish mills will not have comp, which is one of the reasons they may make you a better offer, as comp is very expensive for loggers and truckers. But, many of the Amish mills won’t cut or truck your wood either….they contract that out to loggers and truckers. However, you don’t want to have a logger or trucker (without comp) on your property and get hurt. If they don’t have comp, guess who’s insurance they are going to go after? So, if the logger or trucker is contracted out, contact those companies and get proofs of comp or have the mill do that for you.

If you decide on a logger, ask them to give you scale sheets of all the loads leaving your property every day or week . Make sure you know the difference between pulp wood, bolt wood and veneer…..listed least valuable to most valuable. The veneer will likely have individual barcodes (after they have been bought) put on them as they are very valuable. It’s not uncommon for landowners to not have much, if any, veneer. If you do have veneer, you should contact 2-3 veneer buyers and have them come out and bid on it. They will do this for even a couple of veneer logs as they can be very valuable. But, keep an eye out in the difference between bolt wood (that mills can use for boards) and pulp wood (that mills can use for paper pulp or particle board) or is used for firewood. I’ve seen crook loggers who will give a landowner a scale sheet for wood and tell them it’s pulp wood but then take it to a bolt wood mill. Granted, this doesn’t happen often….but I have seen it happen. The best bet for you is to get a copy of the scale sheet from the place that actually buys the wood. Most of the time the trucker will get a slip when the drop the load off. Most mills do not buy both pulp and bolts so just the mill name on the scale ticket will tell you what kind of wood it is. That’s not always possible, but it’s worth asking for. I would also set up a trail cam so you can see the loads leaving the property. You can pretty much tell what kind of wood it is just by looking at the side of the log truck and trailer. Plus, you can make sure you know how many loads have left your property each day.

Also when a logger/forester gives you an estimate on your forest…..keep in mind….it is an estimate. Anyone that absolutely guarantees you a specific dollar amount, I’d be very weary about. There was a local crook around here who did that and he would pay half up front. The landowners would never see another penny. Their property was ransacked and he was gone. When the landowners tried to go after him legally, they found out they were last in a long line of others and there was nothing to go after. He gambled the money away and didn’t own a single piece of equipment and had zero net worth. His “contracts” for his ‘LLC company’ were worthless. He moved on to another area after about 5 years or so when the law started coming after him. Not surprisingly, he was difficult to pin down. I don’t think he ever went to jail b/c he set up the LLC, but I really don’t know what the end result was. I wouldn’t be surprised if he is in another state doing the same thing he did here. He was FULL of excuses of why the checks weren’t coming in. He’d keep telling the landowners he just needed to wait to get paid from the mill before he could pay them so the landowners would give him time. He originally got landowners contact information at the court house. He would go through the plat book, find those parcels that were large, and send the landowners an offer in the mail. It was amazing how many of those landowners contacted HIM back and gave him the go ahead. :shakeno::thumbdown:

Clearly the larger your piece of property is and the longer amount of time that is has been untouched, along with the species of the wood will have an impact on how much your timber is worth. It never hurts to contact friends or neighbors about their experiences with past cuttings. What would they do differently? Were they happy with the job? You can never have too many opinions. Call local mills and ask questions. Call local log truck drivers and ask who they would recommend if it was their property? Contact local timber or logging organizations and ask them what their recommendations are for folks in your area. If the folks had done any of these things who dealt with the crook I was talking about above, they never would have gotten taken for a ride. A few phone calls may not be all it takes to get the very best logger, but it will prevent you from using someone who has a bad reputation.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:33 pm


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: Selling Your Standing Timber?

March 14, 2017 angie_nrs 0

The following comments do not address the OP’s original post, but I wanted to add a few things for anyone who stumbles on this thread later as it is a good topic.

Here’s a few recommendations for anyone planning on selling their standing timber.

Definitely get at least 3 timber buyers to come and look at your property. Don’t automatically go with the buyer that gives you the highest price. If you do, you may regret it. Do your homework if you don’t want to get fleeced. How long has this buyer been in business? Do they have proofs of insurance (liability and work comp) that their insurance company can send you? Do they do a proper cleanup…..do they cut the tops or chip the tops? Can you see the last 3 jobs they have done? Do they have recommendations or can you talk to the owners of the last 3 jobs? Do they own their own equipment? Are they SFI (sustainable forestry) certified? Will they market all the wood or just certain species or types? What will they pay you for each type? Ask them if waiting for your timber to mature or for the markets to bounce back is a good idea. A reputable forester may very well tell you it’s best to wait a few years.

The reason I say to have their insurance company send the insurance proofs is that there have been crooks that white out the expiration dates and enter their own and then send you copies of their “fake” proofs. If it comes directly from the insurance company it will be valid. A reputable logger/forester will have no problem having their insurance company send you proofs. Note that Amish mills will not have comp, which is one of the reasons they may make you a better offer, as comp is very expensive for loggers and truckers. But, many of the Amish mills won’t cut or truck your wood either….they contract that out to loggers and truckers. However, you don’t want to have a logger or trucker (without comp) on your property and get hurt. If they don’t have comp, guess who’s insurance they are going to go after? So, if the logger or trucker is contracted out, contact those companies and get proofs of comp or have the mill do that for you.

If you decide on a logger, ask them to give you scale sheets of all the loads leaving your property every day or week . Make sure you know the difference between pulp wood, bolt wood and veneer…..listed least valuable to most valuable. The veneer will likely have individual barcodes (after they have been bought) put on them as they are very valuable. It’s not uncommon for landowners to not have much, if any, veneer. If you do have veneer, you should contact 2-3 veneer buyers and have them come out and bid on it. They will do this for even a couple of veneer logs as they can be very valuable. But, keep an eye out in the difference between bolt wood (that mills can use for boards) and pulp wood (that mills can use for paper pulp or particle board) or is used for firewood. I’ve seen crook loggers who will give a landowner a scale sheet for wood and tell them it’s pulp wood but then take it to a bolt wood mill. Granted, this doesn’t happen often….but I have seen it happen. The best bet for you is to get a copy of the scale sheet from the place that actually buys the wood. Most of the time the trucker will get a slip when the drop the load off. Most mills do not buy both pulp and bolts so just the mill name on the scale ticket will tell you what kind of wood it is. That’s not always possible, but it’s worth asking for. I would also set up a trail cam so you can see the loads leaving the property. You can pretty much tell what kind of wood it is just by looking at the side of the log truck and trailer. Plus, you can make sure you know how many loads have left your property each day.

Also when a logger/forester gives you an estimate on your forest…..keep in mind….it is an estimate. Anyone that absolutely guarantees you a specific dollar amount, I’d be very weary about. There was a local crook around here who did that and he would pay half up front. The landowners would never see another penny. Their property was ransacked and he was gone. When the landowners tried to go after him legally, they found out they were last in a long line of others and there was nothing to go after. He gambled the money away and didn’t own a single piece of equipment and had zero net worth. His “contracts” for his ‘LLC company’ were worthless. He moved on to another area after about 5 years or so when the law started coming after him. Not surprisingly, he was difficult to pin down. I don’t think he ever went to jail b/c he set up the LLC, but I really don’t know what the end result was. I wouldn’t be surprised if he is in another state doing the same thing he did here. He was FULL of excuses of why the checks weren’t coming in. He’d keep telling the landowners he just needed to wait to get paid from the mill before he could pay them so the landowners would give him time. He originally got landowners contact information at the court house. He would go through the plat book, find those parcels that were large, and send the landowners an offer in the mail. It was amazing how many of those landowners contacted HIM back and gave him the go ahead. :shakeno::thumbdown:

Clearly the larger your piece of property is and the longer amount of time that is has been untouched, along with the species of the wood will have an impact on how much your timber is worth. It never hurts to contact friends or neighbors about their experiences with past cuttings. What would they do differently? Were they happy with the job? You can never have too many opinions. Call local mills and ask questions. Call local log truck drivers and ask who they would recommend if it was their property? Contact local timber or logging organizations and ask them what their recommendations are for folks in your area. If the folks had done any of these things who dealt with the crook I was talking about above, they never would have gotten taken for a ride. A few phone calls may not be all it takes to get the very best logger, but it will prevent you from using someone who has a bad reputation.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:33 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
BK in KC wrote:

Photon Guy wrote:As for me Im a Ruger guy but I think that if Colt brought back the Python they would see a big increase in sales, especially with the hit TV series Walking Dead. I would definitely want to buy a Python.

Why Colt Will Never Build Another Python

And there will never be another Python. Oh, if Colt’s management were to pull their collective heads out of their collective fourth points of contact and realize the the company can’t survive on dwindling military contracts and civilian sales of their existing lineup, there might be a revolver with “Python” on the barrel. But it won’t be a real Python. And here’s why.

Colt pretty much bet their existence on selling the AR platform to the military. This isn’t a new strategy for the company that Sam built. Samuel Colt would pursue government contracts above all else, even if it meant passing up more lucrative civil sales. By the time of his death at the age of 47 in 1862, Colt was in a desperate state of affairs. Sam had spent lavishly wining and dining potential military clients in the US and abroad, and had let several crucial patents expire. Colt’s Manufacturing pulled themselves out of financial difficulty by selling guns to the US government during the Civil War.

….

In 2003, the Python and Anaconda were retired entirely. The master craftsmen who built the Python retired, or went to work on the Single Action Army Peacemaker. The Anaconda could be resurrected. It was a modern design based on a scaled up King Cobra frame and required minimal hand fitting. With modern CNC machining, a new Anaconda could be made even less labor intensive.

The Python, on the other hand, isn’t coming back. Despite its futuristic good looks, the Python, and the other I-frame guns it was based on, were from an earlier era, when technology was relatively expensive and labor was comparatively cheap. The Python hails from a time when every part was hand fitted to the gun and buffed to a high finish. Those skills are lost, the machinery that made the guns was scrapped and they aren’t coming back.

The article covers the downfall of Colt in detail, it’s worth reading in full. Bottom line: no more Pythons.

Bummer. Before we know it a Python from back in the day will be close to the cost of an M-16 from pre 1986. Too bad we have to suffer from Colt’s mistakes.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:17 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
BK in KC wrote:

Photon Guy wrote:As for me Im a Ruger guy but I think that if Colt brought back the Python they would see a big increase in sales, especially with the hit TV series Walking Dead. I would definitely want to buy a Python.

Why Colt Will Never Build Another Python

And there will never be another Python. Oh, if Colt’s management were to pull their collective heads out of their collective fourth points of contact and realize the the company can’t survive on dwindling military contracts and civilian sales of their existing lineup, there might be a revolver with “Python” on the barrel. But it won’t be a real Python. And here’s why.

Colt pretty much bet their existence on selling the AR platform to the military. This isn’t a new strategy for the company that Sam built. Samuel Colt would pursue government contracts above all else, even if it meant passing up more lucrative civil sales. By the time of his death at the age of 47 in 1862, Colt was in a desperate state of affairs. Sam had spent lavishly wining and dining potential military clients in the US and abroad, and had let several crucial patents expire. Colt’s Manufacturing pulled themselves out of financial difficulty by selling guns to the US government during the Civil War.

….

In 2003, the Python and Anaconda were retired entirely. The master craftsmen who built the Python retired, or went to work on the Single Action Army Peacemaker. The Anaconda could be resurrected. It was a modern design based on a scaled up King Cobra frame and required minimal hand fitting. With modern CNC machining, a new Anaconda could be made even less labor intensive.

The Python, on the other hand, isn’t coming back. Despite its futuristic good looks, the Python, and the other I-frame guns it was based on, were from an earlier era, when technology was relatively expensive and labor was comparatively cheap. The Python hails from a time when every part was hand fitted to the gun and buffed to a high finish. Those skills are lost, the machinery that made the guns was scrapped and they aren’t coming back.

The article covers the downfall of Colt in detail, it’s worth reading in full. Bottom line: no more Pythons.

Bummer. Before we know it a Python from back in the day will be close to the cost of an M-16 from pre 1986. Too bad we have to suffer from Colt’s mistakes.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:17 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 BK in KC 0
Photon Guy wrote:
As for me Im a Ruger guy but I think that if Colt brought back the Python they would see a big increase in sales, especially with the hit TV series Walking Dead. I would definitely want to buy a Python.

Why Colt Will Never Build Another Python

And there will never be another Python. Oh, if Colt’s management were to pull their collective heads out of their collective fourth points of contact and realize the the company can’t survive on dwindling military contracts and civilian sales of their existing lineup, there might be a revolver with “Python” on the barrel. But it won’t be a real Python. And here’s why.

Colt pretty much bet their existence on selling the AR platform to the military. This isn’t a new strategy for the company that Sam built. Samuel Colt would pursue government contracts above all else, even if it meant passing up more lucrative civil sales. By the time of his death at the age of 47 in 1862, Colt was in a desperate state of affairs. Sam had spent lavishly wining and dining potential military clients in the US and abroad, and had let several crucial patents expire. Colt’s Manufacturing pulled themselves out of financial difficulty by selling guns to the US government during the Civil War.

….

In 2003, the Python and Anaconda were retired entirely. The master craftsmen who built the Python retired, or went to work on the Single Action Army Peacemaker. The Anaconda could be resurrected. It was a modern design based on a scaled up King Cobra frame and required minimal hand fitting. With modern CNC machining, a new Anaconda could be made even less labor intensive.

The Python, on the other hand, isn’t coming back. Despite its futuristic good looks, the Python, and the other I-frame guns it was based on, were from an earlier era, when technology was relatively expensive and labor was comparatively cheap. The Python hails from a time when every part was hand fitted to the gun and buffed to a high finish. Those skills are lost, the machinery that made the guns was scrapped and they aren’t coming back.

The article covers the downfall of Colt in detail, it’s worth reading in full. Bottom line: no more Pythons.

Statistics: Posted by BK in KC — Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:58 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 BK in KC 0
Photon Guy wrote:
As for me Im a Ruger guy but I think that if Colt brought back the Python they would see a big increase in sales, especially with the hit TV series Walking Dead. I would definitely want to buy a Python.

Why Colt Will Never Build Another Python

And there will never be another Python. Oh, if Colt’s management were to pull their collective heads out of their collective fourth points of contact and realize the the company can’t survive on dwindling military contracts and civilian sales of their existing lineup, there might be a revolver with “Python” on the barrel. But it won’t be a real Python. And here’s why.

Colt pretty much bet their existence on selling the AR platform to the military. This isn’t a new strategy for the company that Sam built. Samuel Colt would pursue government contracts above all else, even if it meant passing up more lucrative civil sales. By the time of his death at the age of 47 in 1862, Colt was in a desperate state of affairs. Sam had spent lavishly wining and dining potential military clients in the US and abroad, and had let several crucial patents expire. Colt’s Manufacturing pulled themselves out of financial difficulty by selling guns to the US government during the Civil War.

….

In 2003, the Python and Anaconda were retired entirely. The master craftsmen who built the Python retired, or went to work on the Single Action Army Peacemaker. The Anaconda could be resurrected. It was a modern design based on a scaled up King Cobra frame and required minimal hand fitting. With modern CNC machining, a new Anaconda could be made even less labor intensive.

The Python, on the other hand, isn’t coming back. Despite its futuristic good looks, the Python, and the other I-frame guns it was based on, were from an earlier era, when technology was relatively expensive and labor was comparatively cheap. The Python hails from a time when every part was hand fitted to the gun and buffed to a high finish. Those skills are lost, the machinery that made the guns was scrapped and they aren’t coming back.

The article covers the downfall of Colt in detail, it’s worth reading in full. Bottom line: no more Pythons.

Statistics: Posted by BK in KC — Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:58 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
ajax727 wrote:
This is not good news at all but Colt is not the only company that is hurting now . Over the past eight years fear has driven the market gun sales have skyrocketed due to the threat of losing our right’s to own arms . With Trump as potus that threat has diminished and sales have bottomed out and orders have been cancelled . The information i have received is that several companies will be closing there doors due to sales bottoming out and orders being cancelled .

Well the good news is that we’ve got gun rights and we’ve got an extremely pro gun president. The bad news is that gun companies are not making the profit they made during the Obama administration when, as you said, the industry was being driven by the threat to gun rights.

The way I see it, we shouldn’t need our gun rights to be threatened in order to have good gun business. Heck, supposedly lots of the anti Trump liberals are now buying guns. We should promote the shooting and hunting sports. As for Colt, I’ve never had a Colt but I do know they’re a good company. It would be a shame if they went out of business. As for me Im a Ruger guy but I think that if Colt brought back the Python they would see a big increase in sales, especially with the hit TV series Walking Dead. I would definitely want to buy a Python.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:26 pm


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Guns • Re: Colt Lays Off Employees, Company Rumored Gutted

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
ajax727 wrote:
This is not good news at all but Colt is not the only company that is hurting now . Over the past eight years fear has driven the market gun sales have skyrocketed due to the threat of losing our right’s to own arms . With Trump as potus that threat has diminished and sales have bottomed out and orders have been cancelled . The information i have received is that several companies will be closing there doors due to sales bottoming out and orders being cancelled .

Well the good news is that we’ve got gun rights and we’ve got an extremely pro gun president. The bad news is that gun companies are not making the profit they made during the Obama administration when, as you said, the industry was being driven by the threat to gun rights.

The way I see it, we shouldn’t need our gun rights to be threatened in order to have good gun business. Heck, supposedly lots of the anti Trump liberals are now buying guns. We should promote the shooting and hunting sports. As for Colt, I’ve never had a Colt but I do know they’re a good company. It would be a shame if they went out of business. As for me Im a Ruger guy but I think that if Colt brought back the Python they would see a big increase in sales, especially with the hit TV series Walking Dead. I would definitely want to buy a Python.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:26 pm


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General Family Preparedness • Re: Libs Catch the Prepping Bug

March 14, 2017 Murby 0
IceFire wrote:
Murby, you’re a liberal on SOME issues, and a conservative on others…sounds to me more like you’re an INDEPENDENT than either strictly liberal or conservative!

Yes.. and I’m in a constant state of flux too! Sometimes people bring up facets of arguments that I haven’t considered before and it forces me to re-evaluate my position..

Unfortunately, my way (ideas) doesn’t always seem to be the best or only way to skin the proverbial cat.

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:58 am


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General Family Preparedness • Re: Libs Catch the Prepping Bug

March 14, 2017 Murby 0
IceFire wrote:
Murby, you’re a liberal on SOME issues, and a conservative on others…sounds to me more like you’re an INDEPENDENT than either strictly liberal or conservative!

Yes.. and I’m in a constant state of flux too! Sometimes people bring up facets of arguments that I haven’t considered before and it forces me to re-evaluate my position..

Unfortunately, my way (ideas) doesn’t always seem to be the best or only way to skin the proverbial cat.

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:58 am


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General Family Preparedness • Re: Libs Catch the Prepping Bug

March 14, 2017 Murby 0
Gunns wrote:
Well let me poke you in the eye with a stick then. LOL

Poke away! I don’t mind. I’m not always right, but I think it would be wise if we kept this light as these kinds of conversations can go south fast when some folks get overly emotional about the subjects.

I have no problems with Gays either. Just don’t think every TV show, Movie and now Disney remakes have to have same sex making out on them. For a small minority the queer Hollywood producers and writers are pushing it in our faces. That will backfire when SHTF.

I’m not a fan of being force-fed idea’s either.. Regardless of the merits of those ideas, when I turn on entertainment, I want to be entertained, not brainwashed..

As far as socialized health care that is for Socialist thinkers and drug testing is a violation of our Constitutional rights. Can’t see how someone says they base their decisions on science and math can be against the very principles of our Constitution. I can’t find it in the Constitution that says we need to socialize anything.

We already have socialization.. We all pay for infrastructure like roads and bridges, military, and even science like NASA..
Our society needs to be healthy to survive, it also needs to be educated in order to compete with others. Free-market is the best system in the world when it comes to marketplace trade based on elective purchasing (things you want but don’t require) but it fails when it comes to things you must have to prosper.. The conversation becomes convoluted when we consider the wide gray area between what is elective and what is required. Do you need medical care to survive? Of course you do.. But how much? Do you need an Xbox or fishing boat? Of course not.
Could you tell a person with a shattered leg that you’re not going to treat them if they can’t afford to pay you? I think most people would say no to that. So where does the money come from when you spend $20,000 to repair that persons leg? Currently, the hospitals just pass it on to those who have the money.. This is why an aspirin in a hospital cost north of $8 and they even charge you a buck for the paper cup it comes in.
I’m no expert, but it seems to me that such a system is even worse than any conceived notion of what socialized healthcare would or wouldn’t be.

As far as drug testing welfare recipients.. If they’re excepting public welfare, I think that gives us a right to make sure they’re not wasting the money on drugs, in fact, I don’t think welfare dollars should be allowed to be spent on any junk food either. I’m not sure how that is unconstitutional as you say but I’m all ears if you care to explain it to me.. I’m certainly no expert on the constitution or law.

As “Bones” would say.. “Damn It Jim, I’m an Engineer not a Lawyer!”

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:56 am


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General Family Preparedness • Re: Libs Catch the Prepping Bug

March 14, 2017 Murby 0
Gunns wrote:
Well let me poke you in the eye with a stick then. LOL

Poke away! I don’t mind. I’m not always right, but I think it would be wise if we kept this light as these kinds of conversations can go south fast when some folks get overly emotional about the subjects.

I have no problems with Gays either. Just don’t think every TV show, Movie and now Disney remakes have to have same sex making out on them. For a small minority the queer Hollywood producers and writers are pushing it in our faces. That will backfire when SHTF.

I’m not a fan of being force-fed idea’s either.. Regardless of the merits of those ideas, when I turn on entertainment, I want to be entertained, not brainwashed..

As far as socialized health care that is for Socialist thinkers and drug testing is a violation of our Constitutional rights. Can’t see how someone says they base their decisions on science and math can be against the very principles of our Constitution. I can’t find it in the Constitution that says we need to socialize anything.

We already have socialization.. We all pay for infrastructure like roads and bridges, military, and even science like NASA..
Our society needs to be healthy to survive, it also needs to be educated in order to compete with others. Free-market is the best system in the world when it comes to marketplace trade based on elective purchasing (things you want but don’t require) but it fails when it comes to things you must have to prosper.. The conversation becomes convoluted when we consider the wide gray area between what is elective and what is required. Do you need medical care to survive? Of course you do.. But how much? Do you need an Xbox or fishing boat? Of course not.
Could you tell a person with a shattered leg that you’re not going to treat them if they can’t afford to pay you? I think most people would say no to that. So where does the money come from when you spend $20,000 to repair that persons leg? Currently, the hospitals just pass it on to those who have the money.. This is why an aspirin in a hospital cost north of $8 and they even charge you a buck for the paper cup it comes in.
I’m no expert, but it seems to me that such a system is even worse than any conceived notion of what socialized healthcare would or wouldn’t be.

As far as drug testing welfare recipients.. If they’re excepting public welfare, I think that gives us a right to make sure they’re not wasting the money on drugs, in fact, I don’t think welfare dollars should be allowed to be spent on any junk food either. I’m not sure how that is unconstitutional as you say but I’m all ears if you care to explain it to me.. I’m certainly no expert on the constitution or law.

As “Bones” would say.. “Damn It Jim, I’m an Engineer not a Lawyer!”

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:56 am


Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Alwaysthenewguy wrote:
In our modern society I know a lot of guys who are hunters, but are not warriors by any stretch of the imagination. I also know warriors, legit martial artists, cops and may ex-military, who are decent to excellent warriors within their areas of expertise, who know nothing about hunting. With that said, I have been doing some reading and studying about the Native American warrior culture. In particular the plains Indians. They would not have understood how you could have one without the other.

When the plains obtained horses and became mobile hunters, it effected their culture, elevating the role the hunter played in their society. Also due to the fact they were traveling further and competing for food from other tribes, the warriors became more important also. In fact to be a man in that society you had to be both a warrior and a hunter. The two skills were so related that they didn’t really see the difference, warriors were hunters, and hunters were warriors. Navigation, horsemanship, terrain analysis, tracking, camouflage, stealth, knowing how your prey thinks, and skill at arms, were all related to both activities.

I grew up among hunters in rural America. And even now hunting plays a huge roll in my family culture, the whole family hunts. But many people I’m around working as a cop in an urban area, do not have the first clue about being in the woods or hunting. I just wanted to hear your guys thoughts on the subject. I see them as being important related skills, but also know a lot of guys who are without question effective warriors in society now. I also know a lot of hunters that don’t have the first clue about how to win a fight.

In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:53 am


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Alwaysthenewguy wrote:
In our modern society I know a lot of guys who are hunters, but are not warriors by any stretch of the imagination. I also know warriors, legit martial artists, cops and may ex-military, who are decent to excellent warriors within their areas of expertise, who know nothing about hunting. With that said, I have been doing some reading and studying about the Native American warrior culture. In particular the plains Indians. They would not have understood how you could have one without the other.

When the plains obtained horses and became mobile hunters, it effected their culture, elevating the role the hunter played in their society. Also due to the fact they were traveling further and competing for food from other tribes, the warriors became more important also. In fact to be a man in that society you had to be both a warrior and a hunter. The two skills were so related that they didn’t really see the difference, warriors were hunters, and hunters were warriors. Navigation, horsemanship, terrain analysis, tracking, camouflage, stealth, knowing how your prey thinks, and skill at arms, were all related to both activities.

I grew up among hunters in rural America. And even now hunting plays a huge roll in my family culture, the whole family hunts. But many people I’m around working as a cop in an urban area, do not have the first clue about being in the woods or hunting. I just wanted to hear your guys thoughts on the subject. I see them as being important related skills, but also know a lot of guys who are without question effective warriors in society now. I also know a lot of hunters that don’t have the first clue about how to win a fight.

In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:53 am


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Washington Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Patriot Nurse

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0

I met Patriot Nurse when I took one of her classes. From my experience she is a good instructor and a nice person although not everybody has had the same experience as me. There is some controversy about her and there is this one fellow made a video about how he had a bad experience with her although this is just his side of the story. It would be nice to hear her side. Here is the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmKH9xbpWtA

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 10:55 am


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Pennsylvania Discussion, News and Weather • Re: PA: Blizzard on the Way! Ugh!

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0

Im in A, it sucks! Its weather like this that makes me want to hibernate through it, but I’ve got to keep in good shape. I won’t be going to Jiu Jitsu today as the roads are not in proper condition for driving. So I will just be staying home and doing some working out at home. Fortunately I do have enough food in the fridge to last me the day so I will not have to go into my reserves, but I should’ve stocked up on more prior to all this snowfall.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 10:51 am


:dots:

Pennsylvania Discussion, News and Weather • Re: PA: Blizzard on the Way! Ugh!

March 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Straydog wrote:
I’ve been chuckling over this all day. Schools officially closed here in NY by edict of his immenseness the &%&*%**^ Cuomo. Shut the schools down statewide since we might get some snow. Really? We have not had serious snow here in years, minus the 7′ that fell in Buffalo a few years back. None of our winters are anything like they used to be and we are in the prime lake effect region. We are used to having serious snow so 20″ really is not a big deal. Sure, the wind could kick up, it might force people to slow down a bit. It won’t make people think to prepare ahead of time and I can only imagine how many generators, gallons of milk, and loaves of bread were sold. Likely cases of water too. These days the news and those in charge hype every little thing to the point of idiocy while paying no attention to important things. So, I will enjoy the roads to myself hopefully as I make my daily commute to work. I won’t have time to worry about a few snowflakes. Real or Liberal… :dots:

If it impacts NYC, then it is news.
As for the rest of us, well, they do not pay attention to what happens outside of NYC.

Two weeks ago, they got snow and it made the national news. A few days later, we got even more snow.
Not so much as a peep.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:11 am