No Picture

Alaska A.N.T.S. • Re: Anchorage ANTS

May 22, 2017 cyberdoo78 0

Thanks for the encouragement. I’ll try the tips you suggest to continue to expand the group. I’m going to continue to write articles as well to try to engage people and keep them interested.

Statistics: Posted by cyberdoo78 — Mon May 22, 2017 1:39 pm


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Inside Cheyenne Mountain II

May 22, 2017 Permafrost 0

Rickdun,
How exactly would the population as a whole prepare for a EMP? Granted you can put some stuff in a faraday cage or stock a little food, but other than that most folks have no way to prep for a EMP event so why spook the herd. In major metro areas it is not possible to prep in any meaningful way for a long term grid down emergency. If nothing else just think of all those out of shape high rise dwellers who will have no elevators to get multiple stories up to their homes, and no water to drink if they get there without having a heart attack. While I think that people should know, I think that the government fears a mass panic about something that is largely theoretical until it happened and people find out what the effects are. A full disclosure of most of the threats facing modern society would disrupt an already fragile economy, and the government only cares about staying in power and keeping the tax money coming in.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon May 22, 2017 12:56 pm


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Inside Cheyenne Mountain II

May 22, 2017 rickdun 0

Thanks ReadyMom, sounds like the government is getting more nervous about the possibility of an EMP.

You think they would let us citizens in on some of what they know and what the citizens should prepare for, although most of the APN members here are prepared or are doing so.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Mon May 22, 2017 12:34 pm


No Picture

Introduce Yourself • Hello all

May 22, 2017 robertdell456 0

Hello from Kansas looking for others around the Manhattan Ks. area that are into prepping and the like get back with me on here and much thanks for your time as we all need more of that.

Robert

Statistics: Posted by robertdell456 — Mon May 22, 2017 12:15 pm


No Picture

General Family Preparedness • Re: Burying a tank for storage

May 22, 2017 oldasrocks 0
ajax727 wrote:
Good advice oldasrocks .
I cut my first one open back in 76 or 77 . We piped in fumes from a tractor , and the temps was around 40 degrees . We built a wood fired water system to cure tobacco it was a money saver for us . 4″ tubes 28 of them , 5 feet deep fire box . One stack fan pulling air (home made ) one door fan pushing air and a brick on a top fill pipe ( pressure relief valve ), when the brick was rocking the water temp would be 212 -215 .

Love it! that’s the American way-build it yourself.

They’re digging up a few more underground gas tanks around here. SO tempting to haul a couple more home.

I’m probably lucky I didn’t get caught hauling the two I have. 20 ft long and 10 ft diameter. I had a crane sit them on my 20 ft trailer and drove home. Drug them off with a tractor. No wide load signs, no hazmat paperwork, nothing. I cut one in half for two 10 ft tall 10 ft diameter sheds. The final cut when they split open they always flare/pop. Scares the poop out of you.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon May 22, 2017 11:38 am


No Picture

Alaska A.N.T.S. • Re: Anchorage ANTS

May 22, 2017 Permafrost 0

Best of luck to you, I know others have tried to put groups and ants colonies together in the Anchorage/Mat-Su area but they eventually fizzled out. I’m to far north to be of much help and I’m not in town that much, but I wish you the best of luck. If you do decide to do training or classes please post them in the Alaska section, you never know someone might see it & show up. You might try partnering with the Cooperative Extension or Red Cross for some classes, it could draw in like minded people who do not know that they are preppers.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon May 22, 2017 11:34 am


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Inside Cheyenne Mountain II

May 22, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Inside Cheyenne Mountain II
http://www.krdo.com/news/colorado-sprin … /508026955

COLO SPRINGS, Co. – In response to fears associated with the Cold War, Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station was built in the early 1960’s to withstand a nuclear explosion.

An emerging high tech threat, however, has created new value in this manmade cave designed more than half a century ago.

The original tenant of the mountain, NORAD, still maintains an alternate command center in the underground complex, but in 2006, the agency officially moved its headquarters to Peterson Air Force Base.

That move generated talk about shutting down Cheyenne Mountain entirely.

“There was a lot of vacant space in the mountain, and there were some conversations in those times, the Rumsfeldt era, about whether or not to shutter Cheyenne Mountain,” explained Colonel Gary Cornn Jr., the commander of 721st Mission Support Group in charge of operating and security the installation.

However, the increasing threat from countries like North Korea and Iran, who are determined to develop nuclear weapons and the missiles that carry them, has reversed that talk.

The new fears are not associated with the classic mushroom-cloud explosion associated with nuclear weapons, but rather an EMP blast.

The detonation of a nuclear missile at the right spot above the earth could create an invisible but powerful electromagnetic pulse that could destroy not only every unprotected electronic device in the country, but the power grid itself, taking decades to recover from.

Col. Cornn says the 2,000 feet of granite, along with more subtle features of the mountain complex, acts as a shield against an EMP.

On a normal day, Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station draws electricity from Colorado Springs Utilities, but the military is able to cut the cord almost immediately and switch over to internal generator power in a matter of moments if needed.

“There’s a capability that we have to disconnect from the grid, and that allows us to save up from an EMP threat,” says Cornn.

As a result, the head of NORAD and NORTHCOM confirmed in 2015 for the first time that a number of groups have moved equipment and staff back into Cheyenne Mountain, specifically for its EMP protection.

Admiral William Gortney, now retired, said, “It wasn’t really designed to be that way, but the way it was constructed makes it that way, so there’s a lot of movement to put capability into Cheyenne Mountain and to be able to communicate in there.”

Admiral Gortney wouldn’t confirm which groups have sought space in the mountain, but the fact that he can’t suggests they are among the most critical to the nation’s defense. —- CONTINUED at LINK with VIDEO —

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 22, 2017 10:59 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • EMPs & Automobiles

May 22, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Could a nuclear generated electromagnetic pulse kill your car?
http://www.electropages.com/2017/05/cou … -kill-car/

Published May 22 2017

Most of us know about the latest round of sabre-rattling, chest-thumping verbal exchanges between the USA and North Korea as they strive to convince each other their military weapons are biggest and best. Its familiar stuff, except for just recently when the subject of nuclear generated electromagnetic pulses reared its potentially devastating head.

Electromagnetic pulses (EMP) as a form of military weapon have of course been known about for years although information about them has been closely guarded.

An enemy could use EMP to destroy the electrical and electronic infrastructure of another country with massively debilitating effect. Anything from communications systems, power grids, electronic equipment, water and fuel services and much more could be disabled by an EMP attack.

However one element of modern life that may possibly withstand such an attack are the cars we drive.

But before delving into that, what is an EMP? The most familiar one to most of us is a lightening strike which in EMP parlance is classified as an E2 strike. Potentially very dangerous but usually controlled by surge protection technology so damage is minimised.

Nuclear generated EMP

In comparison to lightening, an EMP created by a high altitude nuclear device has the higher classification of E1 and is far more powerful.

Following such a nuclear detonation, gamma rays are released that start to absorb electrons from the atmosphere and both of these head towards earth. This is called the Compton Effect and the electrons combine with Earth’s electromagnetic field to generate extremely powerful magnetic waves.

The nuclear device prompting all this doesn’t need to be that big. In the early 1960s the USA tested a 1.5-megaton nuclear EMP in a study referred to as Starfish Prime above the Pacific Ocean. It caused electrical damage 900 miles away in Hawaii by disabling about 3% of the island’s street lighting.

However, if that same warhead had been exploded 200 miles above the US mainland the damage would have been far more. The strength of that EMP would have been up to 30,000Volts/metre because the Earth’s magnetic field has greater strength over the United States territory rather than the Pacific Ocean. And while on the subject of EMP strength, scientists today estimate that in the right location an E1 EMP could be as powerful as 50,000Volts/metre.

Wrecked Infrastructure

So having wrecked a substantial amount of what is considered modern infrastructure would a nuclear EMP attack also disable our cars? This is a tricky question to answer because even today the effects of a true nuclear EMP are difficult to accurately predict.

At the time of the Starfish Prime test cars were much simpler technically than today’s vehicles and the generally held view at that time was cars might stall but would probably start up and run normally.

Today opinions on the subject vary enormously. One view is that if your car has electronic fuel injection, anything computerised that controls your vehicle’s primary systems, a powertrain control module, ABS, electronic ignition or keyless ignition then your vehicle would be totally disabled by an E1 EMP of 50,000Volts/metre.

Sensitive Electronics

However, opposing that somewhat negative perspective is the view that many vehicles might survive an E1 EMP. Sensitive electronics may be shielded well enough to continue to operate. In effect, the metal parts of a car body could potentially act as a Faraday cage. And lets not forget that many electronic components used in cars have to operate in harsh, high temperature conditions and consequently are often of more robust design and are well protected.

However, the Faraday cage optimism is somewhat dented by the fact that if a car body did form a perfect cage then you wouldn’t be able to make phone calls from it.

Generally speaking the answer to whether our modern cars could stand up to an Electromagnetic Pulse attack comes down to just one thing; how strong is the attack.

Tests in the past have shown that car electronics subjected to an EMP of less than 25,000Volts/metre would not be effected. It is only when an EMP of E1 proportions (50kVm) strikes that serious problems could occur that would either totally disable the car or cause malfunctions on a car that was being driven that would inevitably result in a road traffic accident.

Tests have also shown that cars switched off at the time of a high power EMP would start and function close to normal.

So some drivers could find their cars were still working following a substantial EMP attack. The question is would they still be useful bearing in mind fuel would not be available because the electronics used in garage petrol pumps would be disabled and highway control systems such as traffic lights would be out. Add to that the fact highways would be jammed with dead cars and perhaps the overall answer to the headline question is don’t throw your bicycle away yet.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 22, 2017 10:54 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 22, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Another Missile launch on Sunday (05/21/17):

US official: North Korea launches medium-range ballistic missile
http://abcnews.go.com/International/sou … d=47539922

North Korea launched a medium-range ballistic missile Sunday afternoon, a senior Trump administration official has confirmed.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said the projectile was fired from an area about 50 miles northeast of Pyongyang.

“We are aware that North Korea launched an MRBM [medium-range ballistic missile],” the U.S. official said in a statement. “This system, last tested in February, has a shorter range than the missiles launched in North Korea’s three most recent tests.”

Prior to the U.S. official’s statement, South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement, “North Korea launched an unidentifiable projectile to the East Sea from Bukchang area in South Pyongyang Province at 16:49 today.” (The East Sea is also referred to as the Sea of Japan.)

The South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff statement continued, “The projectile flew 500 km [310 miles] and ROK and U.S. are now analyzing its detailed [sic]. ROK military is closely monitoring North Korean provocative trends and maintaining highest military readiness.”

Commander David Benham, a U.S. Pacific Command spokesman, also addressed the missile launch, saying in a statement, “U.S. Pacific Command detected and tracked what we assess was a North Korean missile launch at 09:59 p.m. Hawaii time May 20. The launch of a medium range ballistic missile occurred near Pukchang. The missile was tracked until it landed in the Sea of Japan.”

The statement continued, “We are working with our Interagency partners on a more detailed assessment. We continue to monitor North Korea’s actions closely. U.S. Pacific Command stands behind our ironclad commitment to the security of our allies in the Republic of Korea and Japan. The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) assessed that the missile launch from North Korea did not pose a threat to North America.”

South Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs condemned the missile launch, saying in a statement, “The repeated provocation of North Korea is a reckless and irresponsible act that puts cold water on the expectations and aspirations of the Korean government and the international community for the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and peace settlement, and the government strongly condemns this provocation.”

The ministry continued, “The government recently announced a firm commitment to pursue the root resolution of the North Korean nuclear issue through all means including sanctions and dialogue, through dispatching special envoys to major countries such as the US, China, Japan and Russia. While the government is open to possibility of dialogue with North Korea, it will continue to stand firmly in response to provocations, saying that North Korea should immediately stop any provocations that violated UN Security Council resolutions.”

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo Sunday, “This launch presented a grave problem from the perspective of ensuring safety of aircraft and vessels. It was also a clear violation of the United Nations’ Security Council resolution. Japan cannot accept North Korea’s repeated provocation and we have lodged a strong protest against North Korea.”

Suga added, “At this point, it is speculated that the area where it fell was not within Japan’s Economic Exclusive Zone. There has been so far no report of damage to aircraft or vessels that were passing near the point [where the missile was believed to have fallen.]”

“This launch presented a grave problem from the perspective of ensuring safety of aircraft and vessels. It was also a clear violation of the United Nations’ Security Council resolution. Japan cannot accept North Korea’s repeated provocation and we have lodged a strong protest against North Korea.”

The missile launched Sunday was last tested in February. Called the KN-15, the new solid-fueled missile traveled 310 miles into the Sea of Japan. It was a significant launch, not because of the distance traveled but because of the solid fuel missile technology used in the launch.

Gen. John Hyten, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command, told the Senate Armed Services Committee that the February launch marked a significant advancement for North Korea because it was its first successful solid-fueled missile fired from a mobile launcher.

North Korea last weekend launched a midrange missile that landed in the Sea of Japan after being launched from western North Korea. The Russian Ministry of Defense said the missile flew for about 23 minutes before crashing into the sea around 500 km (310 miles) from Russia into the center of the Sea of Japan.

ABC News’ Devin Dwyer and Joohee Cho contributed to this report.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 22, 2017 10:48 am


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MAY 2017 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

May 22, 2017 IceFire 0

Since my dehydrator died on me–we were right in the middle of dehydrating a bunch of watermelon (dehydrated watermelon comes out like CANDY, because the sugars are concentrated) so it was VERY disappointing–I went ahead and ordered a new one. All metal, 10 trays (about 12×14) rear-mounted fan/heating element so you don’t have to rotate trays around. Still going to try and see if there’s someplace where I can get the heat/fan unit fixed, as that would give us two.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Mon May 22, 2017 9:37 am


No Picture

Alaska A.N.T.S. • Anchorage ANTS

May 22, 2017 cyberdoo78 0

Just dropping a line that I’m in the process of putting together a local colony here in Anchorage, Alaska. If you are interested, please feel free to check out http://www.anchorageants.org where you’ll find a contact form. I’m working to build a local article base for our local colony. The site is open to other colony members who have knowledge that they think is relevant and useful to our local colony.

I’m shooting to have a Tuesday evening once a month to get locals together to network together, come up with some ideas, perhaps some training or classes, and other things of that nature.

I’m open to ideas and suggestions to make things better and more useful.

Statistics: Posted by cyberdoo78 — Mon May 22, 2017 7:26 am


No Picture

General Family Preparedness • Re: Burying a tank for storage

May 22, 2017 ajax727 0

Good advice oldasrocks .
I cut my first one open back in 76 or 77 . We piped in fumes from a tractor , and the temps was around 40 degrees . We built a wood fired water system to cure tobacco it was a money saver for us . 4″ tubes 28 of them , 5 feet deep fire box . One stack fan pulling air (home made ) one door fan pushing air and a brick on a top fill pipe ( pressure relief valve ), when the brick was rocking the water temp would be 212 -215 .

Statistics: Posted by ajax727 — Mon May 22, 2017 7:00 am


No Picture

Introduce Yourself • Hi – CASTING CALL Australian feature film

May 22, 2017 underwood 0

Hi All
My name is Alice and my partner’s name is Amiel Courtin-Wilson. He is a celebrated filmmaker based in Melbourne, Australia and for the last two years we have been making a film in the south of the USA. We now we are looking for more voices to be a part of the project. The film explores peoples’s anxieties about the future of America. We are looking for people from the prepper community to share their stories and their dreams with us. This can potentially be done simply via audio and can also be anonymous if desired. If you or anyone you know may feel comfortable sharing your stories with us or being filmed, or if you have any questions about the film, please respond here or alternatively email me at alicejamiesondowd@gmail.com .
Thanks so much,
Alice.

Statistics: Posted by underwood — Mon May 22, 2017 3:23 am


No Picture

Got herbal questions 5/21/17: Ask Cat

May 22, 2017 gman 0

Got herbal questions: Ask Cat Cat Ellis “Herbal Prepper Live” Audio in player below! Cat answers your questions about herbal and natural remedies to this “Ask Cat” episode. I take all the questions from the audience on everything herbal or prepper survival related. Over 80% of the world’s population today uses herbal medicine for some portion of … Continue reading Got herbal questions 5/21/17: Ask Cat

The post Got herbal questions 5/21/17: Ask Cat appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

No Picture

Guns • Re: Remington 700’s

May 22, 2017 Photon Guy 0
JoyDog wrote:
Just killed a coyote with mine this morning. Great gun!

Well good although you said you’ve had your Remington for more than 30 years. If you got a Remington from back than you mostly did get an excellent gun. Remington used to make top quality products but not anymore as they’ve downslidden. I got a Remington 870 that Ive had for more than 15 years and it has done fine but as of now if I was looking for a good gun I would not consider Remingtons. I would look into other companies.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Sun May 21, 2017 9:34 pm


No Picture

General Family Preparedness • Re: Burying a tank for storage

May 22, 2017 oldasrocks 0

Ajax do you know how to cut into an old gas tank safely? There is a trick to it and NOT for amateurs. You;ll wake up here and there in cooked pieces if you don’t do it right. Even if a tank has been sitting for 15 yrs it will still blow. The gas permeates into the metal and locked in till heated.

Probably should have been given an insanity plea but welded on a new valve on a 10,000 gallon tank 1/2 full. When you’re hungry you do stupid things. For some reason the last gas tank I repaired spooked me and I have not welded one since.

Fill them with exhaust fumes to offset the oxygen balance. Put an airtight hose on an exhaust, preferably diesel and let it cook for 1/2 hr or more. Make sure you have an exit for the gases on the other end of the tank so it’s vented properly. Leave the exhaust running into it while cutting. I used the regular hose they use in garages to vent exhaust outside. Anything else will melt.

I have a 6,000 gallon tank done that way. Cut a straight line on the side you want the hinge on. Then weld on a piano hinge. proceed to cut out the other 3 sides of the door. Every 12 inches or so of cut cover it with duct tape to minimize any air/oxygen getting back in.

Do the door latch in a way no one can lock you inside.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Sun May 21, 2017 8:39 pm


No Picture

Stories and Fiction • Re: Homeless? Life After a House Fire.

May 22, 2017 rj5156 0

I’ve been running hard since my last post, gearing up to start work planting and trying to keep everything done up to the minute in case I am needed at Bohnert. Doing all the errands and household chores for both of us while Brian puts in very long days. Been on the go, hardly even been home this week but I was trying to be present with a friend whose child was having brain surgery last Thursday and a couple other friends who faced less dramatic but still upsetting health crisis in their families. (Everyone came out OK.) I was feeling on top of it all.

Then the flooding hit our town. We had a hundred year flood back in 04 I think. This one was far worse. Just devastating. Think the official word is we got 6 point some inches of rain in about two hours. Locals report 7 inches and they live here. At any rate it has been like watching a horror show as people started sharing pictures and we made the news and people we KNOW were rescued from their homes and businesses.

Pictures here:
http://www.wlky.com/article/photos-washington-county-flood/9886039

Video here:
http://www.wlky.com/article/raw-video-flooding-in-washington-county-1495245163/9886264

I have mostly been making myself useful since I have a public facebook page. I have shared all the information and helpful stuff I can find. Reaching out to folks we know, talking about how stress and grief are forces to be reckoned with. Doing my best to get information to those who need it. I am not sure power is yet restored to everyone? We have had the luxury of power and internet – thanks Kg! – so we’ve done our best to help.

My week is scheduled already. I will be shoveling mud, hauling it out, and trying to encourage our friends who are fighting for their small businesses. We figured the weekend would be busy with help but weekdays would be a lot slower for helping hands. I am very thankful to be in a position I can do this. Bohnert won’t even ask for me, knowing what is going on here. They are just glad we are OK.

I will try to check in as I can. Not planning to overextend myself, still have a home to run, critters to care for and our own stuff to do but most of that will wait. Be loading up a wet / dry shop vac, scoop shovel, gloves, buckets, and a dump bed wagon in the S-10 and spending a day with each small business owner in the order of how hard they were hit.

No one was seriously injured. It will be a lot of work and take a very long time but small communities are at their best in hard times and it will be fine. Prayers would sure be appreciated though.

Edit to add:
I have set my privacy to none on facebook. Our page should be accessible to everyone if I understand how it works. It is alternately kind of boring with public service announcements that don’t apply to anyone who doesn’t live in the area, hair-raising with pictures of the flooding and discussion with friends about losing a child and other hard things, and we try to post things for morale, pictures of Syd and stuff. I’ll get it caught up here in time but if you are interested much of our news is posted there too.

https://m.facebook.com/renee.clark.7771

Statistics: Posted by rj5156 — Sun May 21, 2017 7:17 pm


No Picture

Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 21, 2017 theoutback 0

If you are talking Japanese beetles, those pheromone traps work good. Just don’t put them close to the plants you are trying to protect. Put them up wind of the plants you want to protect at least 50 yards. If you put them to close to the plants, you will just attract them to your plants.

Sevin (Carbaryl)works real good on them just do not use on pome fruit right at fruit set, they will thin fruit, unless it is your intention. After fruit is over 20 mm it will not thin and can be used with no fruit loss. We use it on bad years for J beetles, but we don’t see them here in Vermont for another month.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun May 21, 2017 4:03 pm


No Picture

Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 21, 2017 theoutback 0

If you are talking Japanese beetles, those pheromone traps work good. Just don’t put them close to the plants you are trying to protect. Put them up wind of the plants you want to protect at least 50 yards. If you put them to close to the plants, you will just attract them to your plants.

Sevin (Carbaryl)works real good on them just do not use on pome fruit right at fruit set, they will thin fruit, unless it is your intention. After fruit is over 20 mm it will not thin and can be used with no fruit loss. We use it on bad years for J beetles, but we don’t see them here in Vermont for another month.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun May 21, 2017 4:03 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Remington 700’s

May 21, 2017 BK in KC 0
MADE IN AMERICA wrote:

BK in KC wrote:Remington’s quality control isn’t what it used to be. If I was looking for a new rifle there are plenty of other options.

Always a two bit conflict comment from you. Always.

Still mad at me 5Forks?

Statistics: Posted by BK in KC — Sun May 21, 2017 3:15 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Remington 700’s

May 21, 2017 rickdun 0
MADE IN AMERICA wrote:

BK in KC wrote:Remington’s quality control isn’t what it used to be. If I was looking for a new rifle there are plenty of other options.

Always a two bit conflict comment from you. Always.

GROW UP, not everybody here agrees with everything that is said or done, but we all get along to learn our weaknesses/strengths or a company’s weaknesses/strengths, you don’t have to be a I’M RIGHT AND YOU’RE WRONG type of guy/sissy. :p

I guess I’ll pay dearly for that comment, but, life’s a b-tch and then you die.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Sun May 21, 2017 2:13 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Remington 700’s

May 21, 2017 MADE IN AMERICA 0
BK in KC wrote:
Remington’s quality control isn’t what it used to be. If I was looking for a new rifle there are plenty of other options.

Always a two bit conflict comment from you. Always.

Statistics: Posted by MADE IN AMERICA — Sun May 21, 2017 1:56 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Remington 700’s

May 21, 2017 rickdun 0
MrDanB wrote:

MADE IN AMERICA wrote:Except for a handful of 700s its a mute issue. Many manufaturers have recalls. Ford, Toyota, GM, Sony etc etc. I own several dozen 700s and have no plans to demonize a weapon that has always served me and mine 100%. Will continue to follow the 700/870 route till the end of time! Anyone wanting out drop me a line on any 700 in excellent condition. Barrel condition and chamberings are not an issue if the price is right.

I don’t think anyone “demonized” the 700 rifle. People have died due to faulty engineering and Remington has come out and clearly stated to check your serial number and discontinue use if it’s on the list. Here’s exactly what they say: http://xmprecall.remington.com/
I’m sure that the 700 is a great long gun. I DO agree with BK that they have had some quality issues as of late. A good friend of mine bought a 12 gauge shotgun. Turns out it was recalled for issues. (If I remember right, it was an XPS? model). Also, I believe it was far more than a “handful” of rifles that shipped with either of the 2 faulty triggers. Not trying to hit a raw nerve with anyone, just passing along useful info that may help others… :gunsmile:

I agree DanB, but some people don’t give a darn about certain things, as they say down South, “Bless his little heart”. :nervous:

Did I get that right Reb?

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Sun May 21, 2017 1:00 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Remington 700’s

May 21, 2017 MrDanB 0
MADE IN AMERICA wrote:
Except for a handful of 700s its a mute issue. Many manufaturers have recalls. Ford, Toyota, GM, Sony etc etc. I own several dozen 700s and have no plans to demonize a weapon that has always served me and mine 100%. Will continue to follow the 700/870 route till the end of time! Anyone wanting out drop me a line on any 700 in excellent condition. Barrel condition and chamberings are not an issue if the price is right.

I don’t think anyone “demonized” the 700 rifle. People have died due to faulty engineering and Remington has come out and clearly stated to check your serial number and discontinue use if it’s on the list. Here’s exactly what they say: http://xmprecall.remington.com/
I’m sure that the 700 is a great long gun. I DO agree with BK that they have had some quality issues as of late. A good friend of mine bought a 12 gauge shotgun. Turns out it was recalled for issues. (If I remember right, it was an XPS? model). Also, I believe it was far more than a “handful” of rifles that shipped with either of the 2 faulty triggers. Not trying to hit a raw nerve with anyone, just passing along useful info that may help others… :gunsmile:

Statistics: Posted by MrDanB — Sun May 21, 2017 10:56 am


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MAY 2017 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

May 21, 2017 farmer_dude48 0

Thinking about moving our preps around. Our little hometown took a pretty good hit this week-end we got about 7 inches of rain in 3 hrs or so needless to say the flash flood that came with it was pretty nasty. It taught me that everything can be lost very quickly.. Preps need to be a lot higher off the ground..

Statistics: Posted by farmer_dude48 — Sun May 21, 2017 9:26 am


No Picture

Financial Issues • Re: Big day today…MY 300th POST!!!…lol.(J/K)

May 21, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
Blondie wrote:

daaswampman wrote:I have no idea what business your in, but there are potential pitfalls with publicity. Swamp

Especially when the housing market crashes and Countrywide was your mortgage lender.

This hits dead on point.

I’m a loan officer…I do mortgages for a direct lender. Everything…if its residential(other than mobile), I do it.

Now that being said, it is an extremely GOOD company otherwise I wouldn’t have been there for 8 years. I do hold myself to a very high ethical standard.(It should really be a normal ethical standard IMO)

I’ll VERY often analyze someone’s opinion that they should purchase a certain home(with Termite damage, home inspection issues, etc..) or refinance for a benefit and I’ll tell them that are better off where they are if there is not a glaring benefit. After I’ve made sure they are VERY aware of things the realtors might not have mentioned if they want to proceed, I’ve done my bit to educate them and then help them accomplish their goals knowing they are educated about their decision.

Here’s the thing though…I’m not the only loan officer in the company….My face on the advertisement, another LO screws up or just does a bad job, they see the ad with my face and then the negative association is there………Again, this has been analyzed and assessed and our company is sound in the leadership so I feel OK about it, but the potential is there no matter how small.

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Sun May 21, 2017 9:00 am


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: MAY 2017 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

May 21, 2017 IceFire 0

Went on a building supply run this morning, and we spent the afternoon working on the stable. Got the decking for the roof on (now we just need to put on the drip edge, then the roll-on roofing.) We also got most of the cross-braces up along the sides, and the ones between the two stalls. After that, we got the 4 remaining plywood sheets up along two walls of the inside of one stall.

I still need to get the rest of the plywood to finish the insides of the stalls, about 12 more 2x4s for braces to attach the rest of the plywood to. Once we get the insides of the stalls done, the horses will be able to start using them, and we’ll get the outsides done as we’re able.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sat May 20, 2017 9:55 pm