No Picture

Water • Re: Bleach?

May 20, 2017 JayJay 0

I have a young neighbor, 25 years old. She has a whole house water filter and I have a Berkey. Her husband is an electrical engineer.
I don’t think she even thinks about the water stopping to her house.
Anyway, I motioned to the bleach in the grocery bag and told her I don’t use for laundry, but add a few drops to my water when I refill it…and she said…EWWWW!!
Oh, yes she did!!!

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Fri May 19, 2017 10:07 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Bleach?

May 20, 2017 JayJay 0

I have a young neighbor, 25 years old. She has a whole house water filter and I have a Berkey. Her husband is an electrical engineer.
I don’t think she even thinks about the water stopping to her house.
Anyway, I motioned to the bleach in the grocery bag and told her I don’t use for laundry, but add a few drops to my water when I refill it…and she said…EWWWW!!
Oh, yes she did!!!

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Fri May 19, 2017 10:07 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Bleach?

May 17, 2017 jean11 0

We have a supply of water stored in 55 gallon barrels. After disinfecting the inside of the barrels and flushing the bleach out, I set them in place on a north facing wall and fill them with water. I add 1/3 cup liquid bleach and tighten the cap. Hubby throws tarps over them and ties them off. Hopefully the tarps will hide the barrels from view and keep them shaded. We also did this in 1999 for the – then – computer scare of 2000. I’ve forgotten what they called it now, but, six years later when we emptied the barrels we were surprised to see that the water was absolutely crystal clear.

Statistics: Posted by jean11 — Wed May 17, 2017 6:12 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Bleach?

May 17, 2017 jean11 0

We have a supply of water stored in 55 gallon barrels. After disinfecting the inside of the barrels and flushing the bleach out, I set them in place on a north facing wall and fill them with water. I add 1/3 cup liquid bleach and tighten the cap. Hubby throws tarps over them and ties them off. Hopefully the tarps will hide the barrels from view and keep them shaded. We also did this in 1999 for the – then – computer scare of 2000. I’ve forgotten what they called it now, but, six years later when we emptied the barrels we were surprised to see that the water was absolutely crystal clear.

Statistics: Posted by jean11 — Wed May 17, 2017 6:12 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Bleach?

May 17, 2017 oldasrocks 0

Bleach goes neutral in about 3 months. Three drops of bleach supposedly disinfects a gallon of water. Drinking bleach? Are you on a central water system? Then you drink a form of bleach everyday. I would NOT try using bleach in stored water. If you are trying to store drinking water, filter and disinfect before drinking, not in storage.

To have bleach in your preps buy dry bleach in tablets. It will last a year or more.” Evolve” is one brand. Not drinkable though as scented. Do not use scented bleach to disinfect water. Instead be safe and buy water purification tablets.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Wed May 17, 2017 6:07 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Bleach?

May 17, 2017 oldasrocks 0

Bleach goes neutral in about 3 months. Three drops of bleach supposedly disinfects a gallon of water. Drinking bleach? Are you on a central water system? Then you drink a form of bleach everyday. I would NOT try using bleach in stored water. If you are trying to store drinking water, filter and disinfect before drinking, not in storage.

To have bleach in your preps buy dry bleach in tablets. It will last a year or more.” Evolve” is one brand. Not drinkable though as scented. Do not use scented bleach to disinfect water. Instead be safe and buy water purification tablets.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Wed May 17, 2017 6:07 am


No Picture

Water • Bleach?

May 17, 2017 bruce7267ad 0

So ive heard diffrent opinions on using bleach to store your water in one of those 55 gal blue drums is either ok or a bad idea. So im a little confused is bleach safe to drink when diluted heavilly or no? Also how long can i store one of those drums in my garage off the floor with bleach in it. Im in southern az so it gets very hot but theres no light in my garage unless i open the door.
Thanks guys.

Statistics: Posted by bruce7267ad — Tue May 16, 2017 10:43 pm


No Picture

Water • Bleach?

May 17, 2017 bruce7267ad 0

So ive heard diffrent opinions on using bleach to store your water in one of those 55 gal blue drums is either ok or a bad idea. So im a little confused is bleach safe to drink when diluted heavilly or no? Also how long can i store one of those drums in my garage off the floor with bleach in it. Im in southern az so it gets very hot but theres no light in my garage unless i open the door.
Thanks guys.

Statistics: Posted by bruce7267ad — Tue May 16, 2017 10:43 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 15, 2017 Gunns 0
maxwonderdog wrote:

Gunns wrote:http://www.shtfandgo.com/store/emergency-water/14-ceramic-replacement-filter-with-pre-filter-sock.html

Isn’t this the same filter technology the ProPur Big uses, except their filter is 7″ instead of 4″? Has anyone here used the ProPur Big?

I believe Propur’s is 7 inches high and 2.75 inches diameter.

The other is 4 inches by 4 inches.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Mon May 15, 2017 10:16 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 11, 2017 Gunns 0
daaswampman wrote:

Gunns wrote:I bought Berkey with the black filters. He failed miserably out of the box. The filter seal was leaking and I did a red dye test and it did zero filtering. If I had relied on that filter to save my life I would have been dead.

So I put together my own with buckets and “Ceramic Dome Water Filter Element with Silver for Anti-Bacterial Purification”. I did the red dye test on this and it worked flawlessly. Though I am the paranoid kind so I also have many Sawyer water filters.

Do you have a link to the filters you are using? I have also had issues with the Berkey filters not being properly seated and sealed. During an emergency, is not the time to be testing your toys. Swamp

http://www.shtfandgo.com/store/emergenc … -sock.html

This is what I got. I got two of them. I tested them to make sure that the red dye did not get through to the filtered water.

What really makes me angry about Berkey is they have Zero Honor or Integrity. I called them about the red dye test failure and talked to several people and they said I was nuts that no filter could pass that test. I even took some pictures of the test.

Now, Berkey says they invented the red dye test. Liars liars pants on fire. I will never buy their products.

Not sure where it was invented or who came up with it but I saw a video by another prepper doing it years ago.

I keep a bottle of red dye with each of my filtration systems just so after I put it together, I can test it. If anyone is using a filtration system I recommend testing it with red dye at least after you change the filters. If it isn’t removing the dye, you could die or come seriously sick in SHTF.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Thu May 11, 2017 9:25 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 10, 2017 daaswampman 0
Gunns wrote:
I bought Berkey with the black filters. He failed miserably out of the box. The filter seal was leaking and I did a red dye test and it did zero filtering. If I had relied on that filter to save my life I would have been dead.

So I put together my own with buckets and “Ceramic Dome Water Filter Element with Silver for Anti-Bacterial Purification”. I did the red dye test on this and it worked flawlessly. Though I am the paranoid kind so I also have many Sawyer water filters.

Do you have a link to the filters you are using? I have also had issues with the Berkey filters not being properly seated and sealed. During an emergency, is not the time to be testing your toys. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Wed May 10, 2017 4:51 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 9, 2017 Gunns 0

I bought Berkey with the black filters. He failed miserably out of the box. The filter seal was leaking and I did a red dye test and it did zero filtering. If I had relied on that filter to save my life I would have been dead.

So I put together my own with buckets and “Ceramic Dome Water Filter Element with Silver for Anti-Bacterial Purification”. I did the red dye test on this and it worked flawlessly. Though I am the paranoid kind so I also have many Sawyer water filters.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Tue May 09, 2017 11:41 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 9, 2017 Gunns 0

I bought Berkey with the black filters. He failed miserably out of the box. The filter seal was leaking and I did a red dye test and it did zero filtering. If I had relied on that filter to save my life I would have been dead.

So I put together my own with buckets and “Ceramic Dome Water Filter Element with Silver for Anti-Bacterial Purification”. I did the red dye test on this and it worked flawlessly. Though I am the paranoid kind so I also have many Sawyer water filters.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Tue May 09, 2017 11:41 am


Image

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 9, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
rickdun wrote:
I don’t know much about the lifesaver, but what I’ve read, it doesn’t do anything with heavy metals, unless I missed it.

I have a big berky, one filter is good for 3,000 gallons of water and does everything the lifesaver does plus heavy metals, etc..

I also have an alexapure pro, one filter is good for 5,000 gallons of water and does the heavy metal thing also plus toxic chemicals, pharmaceuticals, etc..

I have 3 extra filters for each one of the above plus the one that came with them, for a total of 32,000 gallons of water.

yep….The Big Berky kills it IMHO…..We’ve been using ours for about 2 years now daily in the house. In short, it’s amazing….Extremely low maintenance. I’m only running it with 2 big blacks and fluoride filters(can expand to 4) I’ve replaced my fluoride filters only once(probably early) cleaned the blacks 2 times, and the upper and lower more frequently even though it most likely doesn’t need it as often as I do….

With just the 2 filters we’re almost never out of water…If we notice a slower pressure we just pull the faucet/hose sprayer right from the sink and it reaches the top tank on the kitchen counter even on the stand and fill it for about 3-4 min to top it off…pressure is high again within about 20-30 min…..This is for 2 adults and 1 2yr old and 2 small pets with heavy water drinking habits.

This is pretty much our setup without the water level indicator(I hear that’s a leak point but don’t really know)…

I really cant stress enough if you can have it where your faucet reaches the top so you don’t have to do the “Bucket brigade” to fill it each time…makes life O SO EASY. The stand is a huge addition too as I can even get my Keurig water reservoir under the spicket to fill my coffee up every other day. I also store my drinking cup under the Berkey…(It’s stupid to wash a glass after a single drink of water IMHO)
Image
Image

Then we have the Katadyn that’s as portable as it gets really for as solid as it is….

With a single portable filter good for 71 years supply of water(or 23 years for a family of 3), and being surrounded by 3 man made lakes(Duck ponds really) within 1 mile, and 150 gal of stored water, I think were not doing to bad for in the middle of a city…..(and then there’s the 2 gajillion-billion-million swimming pools here in southern CA that are great backups for anything short of a Nuclear fallout)

(review here)
https://offgridsurvival.com/katadynpocketmicrofilterreview/

I honestly think I’m as good as I’m going to try for in this location…If my water needs aren’t met with these preps in whatever hits, if ever, the survival issue at stake would be dyer/life-ending and wouldn’t be from a shortage of food or water…

.

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Tue May 09, 2017 10:10 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 9, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

IIRC, the Berkey Black filters remove 95+% of lead. The PF2 filters are for removing Arsenic and Fluoridation, and I’m pretty sure it further reduces heavy metals, but the black filters do a good job all by themselves. Oops, my bad, looks like the black filters do an amazing job by themselves on lead:

http://www.bigberkeywaterfilters.com/bl … gory/lead/

The Big Berkey range of drinking water filters fitted with Black Berkey filters can reduce lead and other heavy metals by 99.9%+, and can also remove trihalomethanes and many other drinking water contaminants to ensure your family’s safety.

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Tue May 09, 2017 6:42 am


:wave:

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 rickdun 0
maxwonderdog wrote:
rickdun: you are correct, the lifesaver does not filter heavy metals. I looked at the big berkey but for some reason didn’t purchase it. I will have to look back at my notes and see what stopped me, perhaps incorrect information! You have to have the 2nd arsenic/flouride filters with the big berkey to catch the heavy metals don’t you? Aren’t there two filters, the standard black ones and then the 2nd white flouride filters that filters the heavy metals?

The black filter is for heavy metals. Check the alexapure, only 1 filter for all, 5,000 gallons of fresh water. Good luck

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Mon May 08, 2017 3:58 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 rickdun 0
maxwonderdog wrote:
rickdun: you are correct, the lifesaver does not filter heavy metals. I looked at the big berkey but for some reason didn’t purchase it. I will have to look back at my notes and see what stopped me, perhaps incorrect information! You have to have the 2nd arsenic/flouride filters with the big berkey to catch the heavy metals don’t you? Aren’t there two filters, the standard black ones and then the 2nd white flouride filters that filters the heavy metals?

The black filter is for heavy metals. Check the alexapure, only 1 filter for all, 5,000 gallons of fresh water. Good luck

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Mon May 08, 2017 3:58 pm


:wave:

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

rickdun: you are correct, the lifesaver does not filter heavy metals. I looked at the big berkey but for some reason didn’t purchase it. I will have to look back at my notes and see what stopped me, perhaps incorrect information! You have to have the 2nd arsenic/flouride filters with the big berkey to catch the heavy metals don’t you? Aren’t there two filters, the standard black ones and then the 2nd white flouride filters that filters the heavy metals?

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 3:43 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

rickdun: you are correct, the lifesaver does not filter heavy metals. I looked at the big berkey but for some reason didn’t purchase it. I will have to look back at my notes and see what stopped me, perhaps incorrect information! You have to have the 2nd arsenic/flouride filters with the big berkey to catch the heavy metals don’t you? Aren’t there two filters, the standard black ones and then the 2nd white flouride filters that filters the heavy metals?

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 3:43 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 rickdun 0

I don’t know much about the lifesaver, but what I’ve read, it doesn’t do anything with heavy metals, unless I missed it.

I have a big berky, one filter is good for 3,000 gallons of water and does everything the lifesaver does plus heavy metals, etc..

I also have an alexapure pro, one filter is good for 5,000 gallons of water and does the heavy metal thing also plus toxic chemicals, pharmaceuticals, etc..

I have 3 extra filters for each one of the above plus the one that came with them, for a total of 32,000 gallons of water.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Mon May 08, 2017 3:21 pm


:wave:

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 rickdun 0

I don’t know much about the lifesaver, but what I’ve read, it doesn’t do anything with heavy metals, unless I missed it.

I have a big berky, one filter is good for 3,000 gallons of water and does everything the lifesaver does plus heavy metals, etc..

I also have an alexapure pro, one filter is good for 5,000 gallons of water and does the heavy metal thing also plus toxic chemicals, pharmaceuticals, etc..

I have 3 extra filters for each one of the above plus the one that came with them, for a total of 32,000 gallons of water.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Mon May 08, 2017 3:21 pm


No Picture

Water • Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

Hi I recently joined the forum; and just joined the Colorado A.N.T.S. It is great to find like-minded people!

My foray into more serious prepping this past year has been on water and learning more and everything I can about it. The focus has been:
1) We want healthier water NOW to use day to day!
2) We wanted devices/systems that help us day-to-day and also could function if the public water supply suddenly goes away. We are in the city and don’t have a well :(
3) Devices/systems that can be sustained for years to provide drinking water. Portable, replacement parts that can be stored for years, etc.

Water storage and water filtering information is abundant; weeding through it for factual information takes some time! A few things have happened so far for some water independence on our city “homestead” (rain barrels and some experimental UV solar filtering). The item I wanted to discuss today is the Icon LifeSaver products.

On June 24, 2016, we invested in a Lifesaver Cube. I am in no way associated with their company, so am not writing this to “push their product”. After researching, we hoped that this device would meet our above 3 criteria. I wanted to share our experiences, and see if any of the rest of you have tried the LifeSaver devices?

Icon is based in the UK and it is now easier in the US to purchase their products. I see they are selling some devices on Amazon now, they weren’t really selling anywhere else when I purchased. And for something like this, I prefer to purchase direct from the manufacturer for warranty issues if necessary and to insure it is tamper-free, hasn’t been used and repackaged, isn’t some cheap knock-off, etc. So I ordered direct off the Icon LifeSaver website.

Here is the website: http://www.iconlifesaver.com/products/l … r-cube.htm

On their website, they have independent ratings and statistics on what is filtered out of the water. Bacteria, viruses, cycsts are filtered at 99.9% or more (various levels and certifications). This company provides these devices for emergency, humanitarian and military uses as well.

The cube has a built in ceramic filter rated at 5 years with proper care. And the option I purchased has a 5yr supply of carbon filters that are replaced monthly (the filters are sealed in aluminum packaging to prolong their life as carbon filters will degrade quickly). Additional supplies can be purchased in advance and stored for years as Icon seals them in aluminum foil. The cube holds 5 litres of water (about 1.5 gallons), and is rated to filter 5,000 litres of water before the replaceable ceramic filter becomes ineffective. Other than an Icon personal water bottle device, this was the cheapest option to try out their product and see if it works for day-to-day use (basically for two people) easily and effectively.

Thus far we have been using it only to filter tap water for drinking, cooking, and recently watering the seeds we started. We split the seedlings and watered half with water from the lifesaver and the others with tap water. The seedlings watered with the filtered water are definitely growing better, the difference is visible, they are growing faster. However, this could probably be expected with any cheap water filter (bria, etc.) as just removing the chlorine is probably what the plants dislike the most…?

I can tell that the water definitely tastes better, but that is no indication of water if is going to kill you :) I at least drink more because it taste better, and I am one who in the past, does did not stay hydrated enough.

There is an extensive manual about care and maintenance of the ceramic filter of which you really need to read and follow if you want the filtering to work (don’t let the ceramic filter dry out, how to clean it, etc.). It is very durable, I actually dropped the cube from about two feet out of the car the other day and it scratched the outer surface, but nothing broke. I’m not sure it wouldn’t crack if dropped from slightly higher than that, so I’m not planning on trying it :)

My initial plan was to take a sample of local lake water before and after filtering and then send the samples to the local university that does water tests for a reasonable price. This filter isn’t cheap though; so now I am hesitant to put scummy water in it to run the test as what if I can’t get the ceramic filter totally cleaned and then I am going to be worrying about what is left in the filter that is now sitting in the house in the fridge for another 4 years?

I think from the reviews and independent tests that at a minimum, it is a great filter to use in your house with tap water. The cube fits easily on the counter or in the fridge. Because you do pump it to get water, the flow rate is pretty slow, so I usually fill several glass jugs at the same time so when you want to cook or need a larger volume of water, it is already filtered and available quickly. And it is portable to take camping or to the park for picnics, etc. When driving around town working or on roadtrips, I take it along. And following the maintenance is pretty easy as is replacing parts. I really like the design of the cube and the durability.

The con’s are the shipping from the UK, and the price (for the cube, 5yr supply of carbon, and shipping it was $315.95). And for long term SHTF use, I would need to purchase probably another $300 in parts every 3-4 years. The price of the cube is worth it for me as just a tap water filtering device for the home. It is more effective and not really more expensive (over 5 years) than a lot of other home-use advertised systems that probably don’t work as well at filtering, and won’t last as long.

My remaining concern is will the LifeSaver come through in an emergency and we need to filter lake water?
Has anyone else done their own water test without me having to fill mine with lake water and run the tests myself?
Can LifeSaver’s independent tests be trusted for accuracy?
Does anyone else have Icon LifeSaver devices and have you drank lake or stream water filtered out of it, and lived to talk about it? It you have had a device for a while and used non-tap water sources, does the ceramic filter get clogged and stop working prematurely? Does it continue to function with prolonged non-tap water use?

Thanks for your thoughts!

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 2:37 pm


:wave:

Water • Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

Hi I recently joined the forum; and just joined the Colorado A.N.T.S. It is great to find like-minded people!

My foray into more serious prepping this past year has been on water and learning more and everything I can about it. The focus has been:
1) We want healthier water NOW to use day to day!
2) We wanted devices/systems that help us day-to-day and also could function if the public water supply suddenly goes away. We are in the city and don’t have a well :(
3) Devices/systems that can be sustained for years to provide drinking water. Portable, replacement parts that can be stored for years, etc.

Water storage and water filtering information is abundant; weeding through it for factual information takes some time! A few things have happened so far for some water independence on our city “homestead” (rain barrels and some experimental UV solar filtering). The item I wanted to discuss today is the Icon LifeSaver products.

On June 24, 2016, we invested in a Lifesaver Cube. I am in no way associated with their company, so am not writing this to “push their product”. After researching, we hoped that this device would meet our above 3 criteria. I wanted to share our experiences, and see if any of the rest of you have tried the LifeSaver devices?

Icon is based in the UK and it is now easier in the US to purchase their products. I see they are selling some devices on Amazon now, they weren’t really selling anywhere else when I purchased. And for something like this, I prefer to purchase direct from the manufacturer for warranty issues if necessary and to insure it is tamper-free, hasn’t been used and repackaged, isn’t some cheap knock-off, etc. So I ordered direct off the Icon LifeSaver website.

Here is the website: http://www.iconlifesaver.com/products/l … r-cube.htm

On their website, they have independent ratings and statistics on what is filtered out of the water. Bacteria, viruses, cycsts are filtered at 99.9% or more (various levels and certifications). This company provides these devices for emergency, humanitarian and military uses as well.

The cube has a built in ceramic filter rated at 5 years with proper care. And the option I purchased has a 5yr supply of carbon filters that are replaced monthly (the filters are sealed in aluminum packaging to prolong their life as carbon filters will degrade quickly). Additional supplies can be purchased in advance and stored for years as Icon seals them in aluminum foil. The cube holds 5 litres of water (about 1.5 gallons), and is rated to filter 5,000 litres of water before the replaceable ceramic filter becomes ineffective. Other than an Icon personal water bottle device, this was the cheapest option to try out their product and see if it works for day-to-day use (basically for two people) easily and effectively.

Thus far we have been using it only to filter tap water for drinking, cooking, and recently watering the seeds we started. We split the seedlings and watered half with water from the lifesaver and the others with tap water. The seedlings watered with the filtered water are definitely growing better, the difference is visible, they are growing faster. However, this could probably be expected with any cheap water filter (bria, etc.) as just removing the chlorine is probably what the plants dislike the most…?

I can tell that the water definitely tastes better, but that is no indication of water if is going to kill you :) I at least drink more because it taste better, and I am one who in the past, does did not stay hydrated enough.

There is an extensive manual about care and maintenance of the ceramic filter of which you really need to read and follow if you want the filtering to work (don’t let the ceramic filter dry out, how to clean it, etc.). It is very durable, I actually dropped the cube from about two feet out of the car the other day and it scratched the outer surface, but nothing broke. I’m not sure it wouldn’t crack if dropped from slightly higher than that, so I’m not planning on trying it :)

My initial plan was to take a sample of local lake water before and after filtering and then send the samples to the local university that does water tests for a reasonable price. This filter isn’t cheap though; so now I am hesitant to put scummy water in it to run the test as what if I can’t get the ceramic filter totally cleaned and then I am going to be worrying about what is left in the filter that is now sitting in the house in the fridge for another 4 years?

I think from the reviews and independent tests that at a minimum, it is a great filter to use in your house with tap water. The cube fits easily on the counter or in the fridge. Because you do pump it to get water, the flow rate is pretty slow, so I usually fill several glass jugs at the same time so when you want to cook or need a larger volume of water, it is already filtered and available quickly. And it is portable to take camping or to the park for picnics, etc. When driving around town working or on roadtrips, I take it along. And following the maintenance is pretty easy as is replacing parts. I really like the design of the cube and the durability.

The con’s are the shipping from the UK, and the price (for the cube, 5yr supply of carbon, and shipping it was $315.95). And for long term SHTF use, I would need to purchase probably another $300 in parts every 3-4 years. The price of the cube is worth it for me as just a tap water filtering device for the home. It is more effective and not really more expensive (over 5 years) than a lot of other home-use advertised systems that probably don’t work as well at filtering, and won’t last as long.

My remaining concern is will the LifeSaver come through in an emergency and we need to filter lake water?
Has anyone else done their own water test without me having to fill mine with lake water and run the tests myself?
Can LifeSaver’s independent tests be trusted for accuracy?
Does anyone else have Icon LifeSaver devices and have you drank lake or stream water filtered out of it, and lived to talk about it? It you have had a device for a while and used non-tap water sources, does the ceramic filter get clogged and stop working prematurely? Does it continue to function with prolonged non-tap water use?

Thanks for your thoughts!

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 2:37 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: sump pump question

May 7, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Generally speaking, it takes 35 feet of mother earth to filter out the contaminants in ground water. This would depend on where you live, if green grass lawn fertilizers or weed & feed are being applied by the next door neighbor versus living in a rural area where the ground is not contaminated by such things.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Sun May 07, 2017 10:39 am


No Picture

Water • Re: sump pump question

May 7, 2017 oldasrocks 0

“Ground filtered” I would say reverse filtered since it’s coming back to the surface being contaminated with surface pollution.

Even seepage into a basement from the surface would possibly polluted. Water has to go through a lot of soil and deep before it would be considered safe.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Sun May 07, 2017 7:48 am


No Picture

Water • sump pump question

May 7, 2017 blue fox 0

How many here have a sump pump and what are you doing with the water? I realize that most may just have it plumbed to the outside but could it be tied into a storage tank? The water should be good since it would be ground filtered I presume. Just a random thought that I had rattling around. :?

Statistics: Posted by blue fox — Sat May 06, 2017 9:20 pm


A Few Quick Bushcraft Tips and Tricks

April 28, 2017 gman 0

A Few Quick Bushcraft Tips and Tricks There are literally hundreds of tips and tricks out there that are useful in a survival or bushcraft situation. We’ll focus on the four categories needed to secure the basic things you need for survival. If you follow the survival rule of threes, then your basic requirements for … Continue reading A Few Quick Bushcraft Tips and Tricks

The post A Few Quick Bushcraft Tips and Tricks appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

5 Water Storage Tips Everyone Should Know

March 27, 2017 admin 0

Please note this article is about water storage tips. Purification of water is a different topic, although I do touch the topic here a bit. Tip #1 Know Your Containers Not all containers are created equal. Whether the container you wish to store water in is something you can place…

Continue reading

:oops:

Emergency Preparedness in the Big City

February 26, 2017 gman 0

Emergency Preparedness in the Big City It always pays to be prepared for an emergency situation, but sometimes being prepared for an emergency in the city can be different than being prepared for an emergency in more rural areas. Terrain is a huge factor with big cities, let alone the fact that you are in … Continue reading Emergency Preparedness in the Big City

The post Emergency Preparedness in the Big City appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

No Picture

Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 24, 2017 arkieready 0

Of course there are homes with galvanized pipe for water supply. It’s old school, but still out there. To determine what your supply lines are, look under the sinks, where the water comes in, before the shut off valves. Look up in the basement or crawl space, from where the supply enters the home and is dispersed through out.
Galvanized pipe is dull, silver (and often rusty looking) metal (tap gently with a metal object). Copper tubing is, well, copper colored reddish brownish bronzish. Pex/poly could be black, white, blue, red. PVC is white plastic-y, cpvc is yellowish. What did I forget?

Statistics: Posted by arkieready — Fri Feb 24, 2017 8:06 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
donba wrote:
About 10 years ago the light in our front bathroom started leaking water. The galvanized pipes were leaking. The hole house had to be repiped. We had them put in copper, no more problems, the solder has to be lead free. The U S let the various companies import galvanized pipe from china, that stuff is bad news.

nobody runs lines anymore using solid piping – much less galvanized for potable water supply … it’s all rolls of flex hose now – cut and crimp fittings …..

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Thu Feb 23, 2017 3:57 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 donba 0

About 10 years ago the light in our front bathroom started leaking water. The galvanized pipes were leaking. The hole house had to be repiped. We had them put in copper, no more problems, the solder has to be lead free. The U S let the various companies import galvanized pipe from china, that stuff is bad news.

Statistics: Posted by donba — Thu Feb 23, 2017 2:39 pm


No Picture

Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 tidewaterva 0

It is a good idea to periodically have your drinking water tested for chemical and bacteriological contamination. If you are on a well system with water that is acidic, any commonly used metallic piping will be constantly sacrificing ions to the acidic water. After the water has stayed in the piping over night or for longer periods, there will be a higher concentration of metallic contamination in the water. Galvanized pipe was/is zinc coated, and lead was a common contaminant in zinc, especially years ago. An acid neutralizer system (should only cost 1000 or less installed) could provide protection against breakdown of your metallic piping. This is also common with copper piping, and when it is breaking down due to acidic water, it will leave blue green stains on fixtures. Clean and pure water is important to our health, and your water supply should not be assumed to be okay, either with city water or on a private well.

Statistics: Posted by tidewaterva — Thu Feb 23, 2017 10:39 am


No Picture

Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

I’d be more concerned with the solder used to interconnect the pipes than the pipes themselves.

Although, after reading up on both ends of the spectrum, I gather scale buildup inside the pipes COULD contain lead. I find it telling that the websites advocating changing out galvanized pipes are all plumbing sites…unless your water authority does something stupid (like Flint, MI), all the scale buildup will do is restrict your water flow in the house. If the water flow is too low, then that’s a good reason to replace the pipes, not worrying about lead leaching into your water.

But if you want to err on the side of caution, get your water tested before committing to a complete replumbing job. There are home tests kits on the cheap and every water quality testing lab will check for lead among other contaminants. I haven’t bothered with either since I have a whole house water filtration system that gets a yearly checkup and as part of that they check for contaminants, and so far no problem in my 113 year old home…

Sites with info on pipe issues:
http://www.americanvintagehome.com/plum … zed-pipes/
https://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/factsh … rosion.htm

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Thu Feb 23, 2017 10:01 am


No Picture

Water • Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 ConMac 0

Are galvanized pipes dangerous?? I happened to hear my neighbor telling that she has galvanized steel pipes in her home and she’ll be upgrading the plumbing system soon, as the water will be toxic. So I searched and found articles describing the dangers of galvanized steel pipes. Is this information true?? I haven’t checked my plumbing system. How can I recognize whether my pipes are galvanized steel?? Will the water from galvanized pipes be really toxic?? I would like to know your opinions.

Statistics: Posted by ConMac — Thu Feb 23, 2017 7:47 am