5 Water Storage Tips Everyone Should Know

March 27, 2017 admin 0

Originally posted 2016-05-23 11:58:00. Please note this article is about water storage tips. Purification of water is a different topic, although I do touch the topic here a bit. Tip #1 Know Your Containers Not all containers are created equal. Whether the container you wish to store water in is…

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Emergency Preparedness in the Big City

February 26, 2017 gman 0

Emergency Preparedness in the Big City It always pays to be prepared for an emergency situation, but sometimes being prepared for an emergency in the city can be different than being prepared for an emergency in more rural areas. Terrain is a huge factor with big cities, let alone the fact that you are in … Continue reading Emergency Preparedness in the Big City

The post Emergency Preparedness in the Big City appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 24, 2017 arkieready 0

Of course there are homes with galvanized pipe for water supply. It’s old school, but still out there. To determine what your supply lines are, look under the sinks, where the water comes in, before the shut off valves. Look up in the basement or crawl space, from where the supply enters the home and is dispersed through out.
Galvanized pipe is dull, silver (and often rusty looking) metal (tap gently with a metal object). Copper tubing is, well, copper colored reddish brownish bronzish. Pex/poly could be black, white, blue, red. PVC is white plastic-y, cpvc is yellowish. What did I forget?

Statistics: Posted by arkieready — Fri Feb 24, 2017 8:06 am


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Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
donba wrote:
About 10 years ago the light in our front bathroom started leaking water. The galvanized pipes were leaking. The hole house had to be repiped. We had them put in copper, no more problems, the solder has to be lead free. The U S let the various companies import galvanized pipe from china, that stuff is bad news.

nobody runs lines anymore using solid piping – much less galvanized for potable water supply … it’s all rolls of flex hose now – cut and crimp fittings …..

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Thu Feb 23, 2017 3:57 pm


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Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 donba 0

About 10 years ago the light in our front bathroom started leaking water. The galvanized pipes were leaking. The hole house had to be repiped. We had them put in copper, no more problems, the solder has to be lead free. The U S let the various companies import galvanized pipe from china, that stuff is bad news.

Statistics: Posted by donba — Thu Feb 23, 2017 2:39 pm


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Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 tidewaterva 0

It is a good idea to periodically have your drinking water tested for chemical and bacteriological contamination. If you are on a well system with water that is acidic, any commonly used metallic piping will be constantly sacrificing ions to the acidic water. After the water has stayed in the piping over night or for longer periods, there will be a higher concentration of metallic contamination in the water. Galvanized pipe was/is zinc coated, and lead was a common contaminant in zinc, especially years ago. An acid neutralizer system (should only cost 1000 or less installed) could provide protection against breakdown of your metallic piping. This is also common with copper piping, and when it is breaking down due to acidic water, it will leave blue green stains on fixtures. Clean and pure water is important to our health, and your water supply should not be assumed to be okay, either with city water or on a private well.

Statistics: Posted by tidewaterva — Thu Feb 23, 2017 10:39 am


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Water • Re: Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

I’d be more concerned with the solder used to interconnect the pipes than the pipes themselves.

Although, after reading up on both ends of the spectrum, I gather scale buildup inside the pipes COULD contain lead. I find it telling that the websites advocating changing out galvanized pipes are all plumbing sites…unless your water authority does something stupid (like Flint, MI), all the scale buildup will do is restrict your water flow in the house. If the water flow is too low, then that’s a good reason to replace the pipes, not worrying about lead leaching into your water.

But if you want to err on the side of caution, get your water tested before committing to a complete replumbing job. There are home tests kits on the cheap and every water quality testing lab will check for lead among other contaminants. I haven’t bothered with either since I have a whole house water filtration system that gets a yearly checkup and as part of that they check for contaminants, and so far no problem in my 113 year old home…

Sites with info on pipe issues:
http://www.americanvintagehome.com/plum … zed-pipes/
https://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/factsh … rosion.htm

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Thu Feb 23, 2017 10:01 am


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Water • Galvanized steel pipes

February 23, 2017 ConMac 0

Are galvanized pipes dangerous?? I happened to hear my neighbor telling that she has galvanized steel pipes in her home and she’ll be upgrading the plumbing system soon, as the water will be toxic. So I searched and found articles describing the dangers of galvanized steel pipes. Is this information true?? I haven’t checked my plumbing system. How can I recognize whether my pipes are galvanized steel?? Will the water from galvanized pipes be really toxic?? I would like to know your opinions.

Statistics: Posted by ConMac — Thu Feb 23, 2017 7:47 am


Hygiene and sanitation, #1 in watching out for #2!

February 22, 2017 gman 0

Hygiene and sanitation, #1 in watching out for #2! Host: Sam Coffman “The Human Path” Hygiene and sanitation, how prepared are you really in regards to  and (in the worst case) coping with gasto-intestinal disease in a post-disaster environment?  The Human Path Sam Coffman discusses everything you ever wanted to know (and some things you … Continue reading Hygiene and sanitation, #1 in watching out for #2!

The post Hygiene and sanitation, #1 in watching out for #2! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Water • Re: Water for showering

February 22, 2017 kappydell 0

Showers?? A waste of water. Read about water rationing in WW2 Britain – bath water was rationed and each person was allowed only a few inches in the bottom of the bathtub (3 inches I believe). PLUS you were encouraged to share that water, washing infants first, then less dirty folks and finally the grimy family members. (Sharing water meant more in the tub & easier to wash up.) There is some research in immunity circles to suggest that being dirty helps develop immune system strength. If its really austere times, there wont be enough water to waste getting as clean as you might be accustomed to. No sweat, a little dirt is healthy.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Feb 21, 2017 11:01 pm


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Water • Re: Water for showering

February 20, 2017 Ragnar51 0
Photon Guy wrote:
You really should learn how to make and use a sweat lodge like the American Indians do. It gets you just about as clean as if you took a shower and it uses much less water.

Really itneresting, I didn’t know that’s what the sweat lodges were for. I always figured it was some ritual thing. Cool. 8)

Statistics: Posted by Ragnar51 — Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:01 pm


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Water • Re: Best Water Filter?

February 20, 2017 Ragnar51 0

Most people seem to think Alexa Pure is a bit better. I have both and I really can’t tell a difference. My guess is the ALexa Pure love comes from Alex Jones’s show advertising them. Of course there’s other opinions on the best water filter. The best sources I’ve found for info are www.mercola.com and http://www.justaddcleanwater.com It’s hard to find good reliable info when there’s money tied up in it you know ;)

Statistics: Posted by Ragnar51 — Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:00 pm


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Water • Re: storing water 2 liter bottles

February 11, 2017 IceFire 0
Norman11 wrote:
A 55 gal Barrel used $20.00 Cleaned would make a more efficient use of space and a lot less work than 55 I gal. or more 2 liter containers. Not near as breakable or likely to leak

Norman11

It’s all about diversifying…I have 14 55 gal barrels of water stored, AND 166 (83 gallons) 2 qt juice bottles of water. Can’t get those 55 gallon barrels in the house (have to store those outside), but I CAN store several gallons worth of the 2 qt bottles in the house. I also have several 20 oz bottles that I keep on the nightstand (have meds that I have to take WiTH WATER before I get up in the morning.) I like having options.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:56 pm


Water • Re: storing water 2 liter bottles

February 11, 2017 Norman11 0

A 55 gal Barrel used $20.00 Cleaned would make a more efficient use of space and a lot less work than 55 I gal. or more 2 liter containers. Not near as breakable or likely to leak

Norman11

Statistics: Posted by Norman11 — Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:47 pm


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Water • Re: storing water 2 liter bottles

February 8, 2017 BigOrange75 0

Ran across this old thread and want to add some input. I buy gallon jugs of distilled water to use in my CPAP machine and reuse them as water jugs. With these I don’t have to worry because they haven’t had milk, juice, or whatever in them. I keep a few in the freezer, perfect to bust up when making home made ice cream, and did store some on a shelf. Had a couple leak on the shelf so I started using milk crates and have had no more leakers. I only had a few crates and got to checking pricing on new ones and the cost wasn’t worth it to me. Seems like everybody has a few but they are hard to find on the cheap, yard sales and flea markets but not for sale. I check the freebies on craigslist often and lucked into 10 of them recently from a college student moving out of an apartment for free. Probably a one time find. Also as I have heard before store them with jug handles to the middle to keep more support on the sides because they are so thin.

Statistics: Posted by BigOrange75 — Wed Feb 08, 2017 11:59 am


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Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 16, 2017 kappydell 0

Yes, stored bleach does break down losing 50% effectiveness in 1 year. I also keep pool shock (sodium hypochorite) to make a stock bleach solution from. It will store much longer and a little bit makes a LOT of bleach, which can then be used for water storage.

A much older form of water storage (my mother used it back in the 50s & 60s) is to simply pressure can up some water. It is a good way for beginners to learn to use their pressure cooker, and you get some nice, sterile water for storage, or even for medical (wound wash) use.
She also stored tap water in bleach jugs, thinking that any bleach that leached into the water would help keep it good. That water stayed fine for decades.

You can always reboil it if you question its purity. Lets not get our undies in a bundle – there are so many effective ways to make water safe to drink that we can pick and choose what works best in our particular situation. The important thing is that you have some stored away to work with!

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:52 pm


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Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 16, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
primer wrote:
My water comes from a deep well and this is why I am asking. Thanks again.

I do like your water storage prep – wayyyyyyyy to many preppers that are too confident in relying on their well and worse yet on some body of water somewhere in the local area ….

you want to be prepped to barricade the door and stay inside 2 weeks if necessary – a month is even better – there’s all kinds of SHTF scenarios where you don’t want your butt hanging outside screwing with getting water ….

first few weeks to a month is going to be the worse of a serious SHTF – you keep going out to the same water source every few days and someone is going to bushwhack you – it’s as old as man itself ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Mon Jan 16, 2017 11:24 am


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Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 16, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
Illini Warrior wrote:

primer wrote:My water comes from a deep well and this is why I am asking. Thanks again.

just get a gallon of strait up bleach – no flavors or scents or other BS …. full out water decontamination is 8 drops per gallon – 80 drops per teaspoon – you don’t need a full dose but it wouldn’t hurt either ….

This…^^^ +1

be aware bleach expires pretty quickly….cant remember but think its about 6 months(loses effectiveness for initial use)

I have filtration on top of water rotation in my preps(Urban enviro)……A really good idea regardless of stabilization and filters are worth their weight in gold as barter items in a SHTF case. I use the Berkey every day and also have the Katadyn….That’s the “tank” in filters…
https://www.amazon.com/Katadyn-8013618- … ds=katadyn
https://www.amazon.com/Berkey-Filter-Ce … rds=berkey

initial fill rinse container with 1 cap of bleach to 1/3 container of water to sterilize…rinse until bleach smell gone. make sure to store out of sunlight in cool environment amid the 8 drop bleach rule above.

if you have a little extra cash I strongly recommend the WaterBrick…..stores all over the house under beds, closets, etc./stacks and locks in bulk uses….can be pulled quickly for bug out/recreational use(try bugging out with a 50 gal drum)….1 brick is 1 day of water for 3 people and a pet….Easy-peasy. :thumbup:
https://www.amazon.com/WaterBrick-1833- … ater+brick

you can get 5-50gals food grade for free if diligently looking…just will require more prep work.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnT-CLQGx3k good do’s and don’ts video…I really don’t recommend car wash barrels…lol…get food-grade from restaurants or ebay.($5)
depending on what food was in it previously, cleaning varies.

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Sun Jan 15, 2017 9:39 pm


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Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 15, 2017 donba 0

Every other year I drain on our plants our stored water. To keep everything clean One gallon of water and one cup of bleach get rolled around in each Barrel. Then the barrels are refilled with tap water. We will be replacing 6 cases of 16oz bottles with one 35 gallon barrel, this year, need the shelf space. Just a reminder cover water barrels with a tarp or plywood, the sun is bad on the barrels…………

Statistics: Posted by donba — Sun Jan 15, 2017 4:57 pm


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Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 15, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
primer wrote:
My water comes from a deep well and this is why I am asking. Thanks again.

just get a gallon of strait up bleach – no flavors or scents or other BS …. full out water decontamination is 8 drops per gallon – 80 drops per teaspoon – you don’t need a full dose but it wouldn’t hurt either ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Sun Jan 15, 2017 4:14 pm


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Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 15, 2017 Photon Guy 0

I use distilled water which I regularly drink. I’ve got a bunch of 5 gallon water jugs and at full capacity I can store up to 40 gallons but since Im always using it I am constantly rotating the jugs and whenever a jug gets empty I distill more water with my distiller and fill it back up. I use rubber stoppers to close up the full water jugs when Im not using them but I never considered long term storage. Im not sure if I keep a water jug sealed with the stopper how good of a “shelf life” the water will have.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:59 am


:tank:

Water • Re: Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 15, 2017 Photon Guy 0

I use distilled water which I regularly drink. I’ve got a bunch of 5 gallon water jugs and at full capacity I can store up to 40 gallons but since Im always using it I am constantly rotating the jugs and whenever a jug gets empty I distill more water with my distiller and fill it back up. I use rubber stoppers to close up the full water jugs when Im not using them but I never considered long term storage. Im not sure if I keep a water jug sealed with the stopper how good of a “shelf life” the water will have.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:59 am


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Water • Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 15, 2017 primer 0

What do most all of you use for stabilizer for long term storage of water? I use a product called aerobic 7 also I believe that after so long barrels should be emptied and somehow rinsed thoroughly before being refilled what can I use to aid in rinsing before refilling? Thanks for any suggestions.

Statistics: Posted by primer — Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:33 am


:tank:

Water • Stabilizer for long term water storage

January 15, 2017 primer 0

What do most all of you use for stabilizer for long term storage of water? I use a product called aerobic 7 also I believe that after so long barrels should be emptied and somehow rinsed thoroughly before being refilled what can I use to aid in rinsing before refilling? Thanks for any suggestions.

Statistics: Posted by primer — Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:33 am


3 Things to Know When Storing Water

May 15, 2013 Riverwalker 0




There are things people routinely store: clothes, food, exercise equipment, furniture, antique photographs, etc.

But water? Hmmm, an interesting concept. Believe it or not, the average person needs to drink at least one gallon of water per day. And that doesn’t include water for important tasks such as bathing or cooking.

So, when an emergency arises, it stands to reason that clean water is one of the most precious commodities around.

Water storage really is a vital part of any disaster preparedness process. But what’s the best way to go about it? Here are three things you must know when storing water:

1.  Choose the right container

If you don’t know what to look for in a container, you’ll be sunk before you even start trying to store water. Key container attributes include:

·                                 Size — Strive for a container that holds 14 gallons per family member.

·                                 UV yes, BPA no — UV coating keeps light out of your water, preventing contaminant growth. And you won’t want your unit to have BPA in the material, because this chemical can seep into the water.

2.   Clean the container

Once you have a water storage container, make sure it’s sufficiently clean before filling it up. Add a teaspoon of unscented household bleach to 1 quart of water, then let it sit for 30 seconds before pouring out the solution. Your container is now clean and ready to store water.

3.   Change it or preserve it

You should only keep your stored water for about six months before swapping it out for fresh stuff. But if that sounds like too much of a hassle, consider using a liquid preserver to boost your water’s shelf life up to several years. You can also purchase water filters or a water filtration device.

If a natural disaster occurs, the absolute last thing you can afford to be without is clean water. Considering how good people are at storing things, why not put this skill to good use for your family and invest in water storage?

This guest post is a courtesy of Food Insurance ™.

Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.

Riverwalker

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3 Things to Know When Storing Water

May 15, 2013 Riverwalker 0




There are things people routinely store: clothes, food, exercise equipment, furniture, antique photographs, etc.

But water? Hmmm, an interesting concept. Believe it or not, the average person needs to drink at least one gallon of water per day. And that doesn’t include water for important tasks such as bathing or cooking.

So, when an emergency arises, it stands to reason that clean water is one of the most precious commodities around.

Water storage really is a vital part of any disaster preparedness process. But what’s the best way to go about it? Here are three things you must know when storing water:

1.  Choose the right container

If you don’t know what to look for in a container, you’ll be sunk before you even start trying to store water. Key container attributes include:

·                                 Size — Strive for a container that holds 14 gallons per family member.

·                                 UV yes, BPA no — UV coating keeps light out of your water, preventing contaminant growth. And you won’t want your unit to have BPA in the material, because this chemical can seep into the water.

2.   Clean the container

Once you have a water storage container, make sure it’s sufficiently clean before filling it up. Add a teaspoon of unscented household bleach to 1 quart of water, then let it sit for 30 seconds before pouring out the solution. Your container is now clean and ready to store water.

3.   Change it or preserve it

You should only keep your stored water for about six months before swapping it out for fresh stuff. But if that sounds like too much of a hassle, consider using a liquid preserver to boost your water’s shelf life up to several years. You can also purchase water filters or a water filtration device.

If a natural disaster occurs, the absolute last thing you can afford to be without is clean water. Considering how good people are at storing things, why not put this skill to good use for your family and invest in water storage?

This guest post is a courtesy of Food Insurance ™.

Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.

Riverwalker

5 Essentials for Your 72 Hour Kit

April 3, 2013 Riverwalker 0

5 Essentials for Your 72 Hour Survival Kit

Catastrophes always strike without warning. When they do, they hinder the services of local government agencies and community emergency crews. Their equipment, communications, buildings, and personnel will all be affected, making them basically immobile. If this happens, there will be no one to respond to your emergency calls in a timely fashion. This could be a very overwhelming situation for you, unless you’re prepared.

5 Essentials Every Prepper’s 72 Hour Kit Must Have

Experts on emergency preparedness warn that everyone should be prepared for self-sufficient survival for no less than three days after a catastrophe. That means that you need to have the emergency supplies you need to survive for 72 hours. Many recommend that you keep a 72 hour kit in your home, your office and your car. Here are five basic essentials that every prepper should have in a 72 hour survival kit:

1) 3-Day Supply of Water

·         A 1-day supply is 1 gallon of water, per day = 3 gallons for one person for 3 days

·         The human body can only go only so many days without water before suffering from dehydration. During major emergencies, local water services may become contaminated, or simply may not be working at all. It’s vital to your survival that you have enough clean drinking water to last until these local services are restored.

·         Experts recommend such a large amount of water per day because you’ll also need clean water for more than just drinking. Your water supply will be there when you need to bathes, wash dishes or clothes, brush your teeth, and other hygienic purposes.

2) Food Storage Supply for 3 Days

·         Should contain at least 9 meals per person (3 meals per day)

·         Being prepared with emergency food storage will really help to ease your stress during a crisis situation. Remember that your local stores will have suffered the crisis with you. So, they will probably be closed, along with all your other local businesses. Also, credit card processors and ATM machines may also be down. That means you’ll have no way of going out to buy food during your emergency situation. Be sure you have enough food stored to feed yourself until things get back to normal.

·         Your food storage should be made up of mostly non-perishable foods. These types of products have longer shelf lives than fresh or frozen foods. That way, when you it’s time to eat your emergency food, they’re still good for consumption. For good ideas for your 72 hour food storage plan, look into buying canned food, dehydrated food and/or freeze-dried food.

3) Basic First Aid Kit

The following items are recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services to be included in your basic first aid kit:

·         Antibiotic Ointment

·         Hydrogen Peroxide

·         Antiseptic Wipes

·         Gauze and Adhesive Tape

·         Safety Pins

·         Tweezers

·         Instant-activating cold packs (disposable)

·         Sharp Scissors – should have rounded tips

·         Bandages – assorted shapes and sizes

4) Battery-Powered Flashlight

Electrical services will probably be non-operational. So, be sure that your flashlight is battery-operated and pack extra batteries.

5) Battery-Operated Radio

·         There will probably be no power in your local area after the disaster strikes. Make sure your radio is battery-powered and be sure you have extra batteries for your radio.

·         During a man-made or natural disaster, television services may be out. The radio will be your only form of communication with the outside world. You’ll need your radio to stay tuned for important emergency updates like more upcoming disasters, emergency shelters, evacuations, etc…

Author Bio

This content was prepared by Dirk Puckett. Daily Bread is an industry leader in long-term food storage plans. Ready to begin putting your food storage plan together? Start here and place your order today.

 
Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.
Riverwalker
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5 Essentials for Your 72 Hour Kit

April 3, 2013 Riverwalker 0

5 Essentials for Your 72 Hour Survival Kit

Catastrophes always strike without warning. When they do, they hinder the services of local government agencies and community emergency crews. Their equipment, communications, buildings, and personnel will all be affected, making them basically immobile. If this happens, there will be no one to respond to your emergency calls in a timely fashion. This could be a very overwhelming situation for you, unless you’re prepared.

5 Essentials Every Prepper’s 72 Hour Kit Must Have

Experts on emergency preparedness warn that everyone should be prepared for self-sufficient survival for no less than three days after a catastrophe. That means that you need to have the emergency supplies you need to survive for 72 hours. Many recommend that you keep a 72 hour kit in your home, your office and your car. Here are five basic essentials that every prepper should have in a 72 hour survival kit:

1) 3-Day Supply of Water

·         A 1-day supply is 1 gallon of water, per day = 3 gallons for one person for 3 days

·         The human body can only go only so many days without water before suffering from dehydration. During major emergencies, local water services may become contaminated, or simply may not be working at all. It’s vital to your survival that you have enough clean drinking water to last until these local services are restored.

·         Experts recommend such a large amount of water per day because you’ll also need clean water for more than just drinking. Your water supply will be there when you need to bathes, wash dishes or clothes, brush your teeth, and other hygienic purposes.

2) Food Storage Supply for 3 Days

·         Should contain at least 9 meals per person (3 meals per day)

·         Being prepared with emergency food storage will really help to ease your stress during a crisis situation. Remember that your local stores will have suffered the crisis with you. So, they will probably be closed, along with all your other local businesses. Also, credit card processors and ATM machines may also be down. That means you’ll have no way of going out to buy food during your emergency situation. Be sure you have enough food stored to feed yourself until things get back to normal.

·         Your food storage should be made up of mostly non-perishable foods. These types of products have longer shelf lives than fresh or frozen foods. That way, when you it’s time to eat your emergency food, they’re still good for consumption. For good ideas for your 72 hour food storage plan, look into buying canned food, dehydrated food and/or freeze-dried food.

3) Basic First Aid Kit

The following items are recommended by the US Department of Health and Human Services to be included in your basic first aid kit:

·         Antibiotic Ointment

·         Hydrogen Peroxide

·         Antiseptic Wipes

·         Gauze and Adhesive Tape

·         Safety Pins

·         Tweezers

·         Instant-activating cold packs (disposable)

·         Sharp Scissors – should have rounded tips

·         Bandages – assorted shapes and sizes

4) Battery-Powered Flashlight

Electrical services will probably be non-operational. So, be sure that your flashlight is battery-operated and pack extra batteries.

5) Battery-Operated Radio

·         There will probably be no power in your local area after the disaster strikes. Make sure your radio is battery-powered and be sure you have extra batteries for your radio.

·         During a man-made or natural disaster, television services may be out. The radio will be your only form of communication with the outside world. You’ll need your radio to stay tuned for important emergency updates like more upcoming disasters, emergency shelters, evacuations, etc…

Author Bio

This content was prepared by Dirk Puckett. Daily Bread is an industry leader in long-term food storage plans. Ready to begin putting your food storage plan together? Start here and place your order today.

 
Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.
Riverwalker

Rainwater Revival in Boerne

September 29, 2012 Riverwalker 0

On Saturday, October 27, 2012 at the Boerne Convention & Community Center from to there will be a special and very informative presentation on rainwater harvesting presented by rainwaterrevival.com. There will be presentations by rainwater professionals and users of rainwater. There will also be water conservation-related vendors and several displays of different rainwater systems. There will also be plenty of experts to provide guidance on rainwater harvesting and to answer your questions in this regard.

You can get additional information here:

“When the well is dry, we know the worth of water.” ~ Benjamin Franklin

Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.

Riverwalker

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Rainwater Revival in Boerne

September 29, 2012 Riverwalker 0

On Saturday, October 27, 2012 at the Boerne Convention & Community Center from 10am to 4pmthere will be a special and very informative presentation on rainwater harvesting presented by rainwaterrevival.com. There will be presentations by rainwater professionals and users of rainwater. There will also be water conservation-related vendors and several displays of different rainwater systems. There will also be plenty of experts to provide guidance on rainwater harvesting and to answer your questions in this regard.

You can get additional information here:

“When the well is dry, we know the worth of water.” ~ Benjamin Franklin

Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.

Riverwalker