No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 27, 2017 ReadyMom 0
theoutback wrote:

3ADScout wrote:Was thinking with the holiday weekend in the US would NK detonate the nuke they have had ready to test? Time will tell.

I just heard on the news the US is testing a missile that can take down a medium range ballistic missile. I think they said this coming Tuesday.

Amid North Korea dangers, US to launch first-of-its-kind missile intercept test
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/05/26 … -test.html

The Pentagon announced plans for a test in just a few days that would involve shooting down an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) — similar to what North Korea has launched.

U.S. military personnel plan to launch a custom-made missile from the Marshall Islands and aim to shoot it down in space by firing an interceptor missile from a base in California.

The missile is meant to simulate an ICBM, meaning it will fly faster than missiles used in previous intercept tests, according to Christopher Johnson, spokesman for the Missile Defense Agency. The target is not a mock-up of an actual North Korean ICBM.

This is the first time the U.S. military has attempted to test a ground-based interceptor against an “intercontinental class target,” The Missile Defense Agency confirmed to Fox News.

The interceptor test, scheduled for Tuesday, comes after two recent successful North Korean ballistic missile launches. One of the medium-range ballistic missiles flew more than 1,200 miles into space, before successfully reentering the Earth’s atmosphere and splashing down just 60 miles from Russia.

North Koren leader Kim Jong-un has vowed to field a nuclear-armed missile capable of reaching American territory. He has yet to test an intercontinental ballistic missile, or ICBM, but Pentagon officials believe he is speeding in that direction. North Korea’s deputy U.N. envoy said the country will continue to strengthen its nuclear program to counter U.S. aggression.

Published May 26, 2017
Fox News

Now Playing

North Korea claims it’s ready to strike the US with missiles

The Pentagon announced plans for a test in just a few days that would involve shooting down an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) — similar to what North Korea has launched.

U.S. military personnel plan to launch a custom-made missile from the Marshall Islands and aim to shoot it down in space by firing an interceptor missile from a base in California.

The missile is meant to simulate an ICBM, meaning it will fly faster than missiles used in previous intercept tests, according to Christopher Johnson, spokesman for the Missile Defense Agency. The target is not a mock-up of an actual North Korean ICBM.

NORTH KOREA: ROCKET STARS BEHIND KIM JONG UN’S MISSILE PROGRAM REVEALED

This is the first time the U.S. military has attempted to test a ground-based interceptor against an “intercontinental class target,” The Missile Defense Agency confirmed to Fox News.

The interceptor test, scheduled for Tuesday, comes after two recent successful North Korean ballistic missile launches. One of the medium-range ballistic missiles flew more than 1,200 miles into space, before successfully reentering the Earth’s atmosphere and splashing down just 60 miles from Russia.

North Koren leader Kim Jong-un has vowed to field a nuclear-armed missile capable of reaching American territory. He has yet to test an intercontinental ballistic missile, or ICBM, but Pentagon officials believe he is speeding in that direction. North Korea’s deputy U.N. envoy said the country will continue to strengthen its nuclear program to counter U.S. aggression.

Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, said at a Senate hearing on Tuesday that if left unchecked, North Korea will develop a nuclear device that has intercontinental capabilities.

“If left on its current trajectory, the regime will ultimately succeed in fielding a nuclear-armed missile capable of threatening the United States homeland,” Stewart said.

The American interceptor has a spotty track record, succeeding in nine of 17 attempts since 1999. The most recent test, in June 2014, was a success, but that followed three straight failures. The system has evolved from the multibillion-dollar effort triggered by President Ronald Reagan’s 1983 push for a “Star Wars” solution to ballistic missile threats during the Cold War — when the Soviet Union was the only major worry.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 26, 2017 7:23 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 27, 2017 ReadyMom 0
theoutback wrote:

3ADScout wrote:Was thinking with the holiday weekend in the US would NK detonate the nuke they have had ready to test? Time will tell.

I just heard on the news the US is testing a missile that can take down a medium range ballistic missile. I think they said this coming Tuesday.

Amid North Korea dangers, US to launch first-of-its-kind missile intercept test
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/05/26 … -test.html

The Pentagon announced plans for a test in just a few days that would involve shooting down an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) — similar to what North Korea has launched.

U.S. military personnel plan to launch a custom-made missile from the Marshall Islands and aim to shoot it down in space by firing an interceptor missile from a base in California.

The missile is meant to simulate an ICBM, meaning it will fly faster than missiles used in previous intercept tests, according to Christopher Johnson, spokesman for the Missile Defense Agency. The target is not a mock-up of an actual North Korean ICBM.

This is the first time the U.S. military has attempted to test a ground-based interceptor against an “intercontinental class target,” The Missile Defense Agency confirmed to Fox News.

The interceptor test, scheduled for Tuesday, comes after two recent successful North Korean ballistic missile launches. One of the medium-range ballistic missiles flew more than 1,200 miles into space, before successfully reentering the Earth’s atmosphere and splashing down just 60 miles from Russia.

North Koren leader Kim Jong-un has vowed to field a nuclear-armed missile capable of reaching American territory. He has yet to test an intercontinental ballistic missile, or ICBM, but Pentagon officials believe he is speeding in that direction. North Korea’s deputy U.N. envoy said the country will continue to strengthen its nuclear program to counter U.S. aggression.

Published May 26, 2017
Fox News

Now Playing

North Korea claims it’s ready to strike the US with missiles

The Pentagon announced plans for a test in just a few days that would involve shooting down an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) — similar to what North Korea has launched.

U.S. military personnel plan to launch a custom-made missile from the Marshall Islands and aim to shoot it down in space by firing an interceptor missile from a base in California.

The missile is meant to simulate an ICBM, meaning it will fly faster than missiles used in previous intercept tests, according to Christopher Johnson, spokesman for the Missile Defense Agency. The target is not a mock-up of an actual North Korean ICBM.

NORTH KOREA: ROCKET STARS BEHIND KIM JONG UN’S MISSILE PROGRAM REVEALED

This is the first time the U.S. military has attempted to test a ground-based interceptor against an “intercontinental class target,” The Missile Defense Agency confirmed to Fox News.

The interceptor test, scheduled for Tuesday, comes after two recent successful North Korean ballistic missile launches. One of the medium-range ballistic missiles flew more than 1,200 miles into space, before successfully reentering the Earth’s atmosphere and splashing down just 60 miles from Russia.

North Koren leader Kim Jong-un has vowed to field a nuclear-armed missile capable of reaching American territory. He has yet to test an intercontinental ballistic missile, or ICBM, but Pentagon officials believe he is speeding in that direction. North Korea’s deputy U.N. envoy said the country will continue to strengthen its nuclear program to counter U.S. aggression.

Lt. Gen. Vincent Stewart, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, said at a Senate hearing on Tuesday that if left unchecked, North Korea will develop a nuclear device that has intercontinental capabilities.

“If left on its current trajectory, the regime will ultimately succeed in fielding a nuclear-armed missile capable of threatening the United States homeland,” Stewart said.

The American interceptor has a spotty track record, succeeding in nine of 17 attempts since 1999. The most recent test, in June 2014, was a success, but that followed three straight failures. The system has evolved from the multibillion-dollar effort triggered by President Ronald Reagan’s 1983 push for a “Star Wars” solution to ballistic missile threats during the Cold War — when the Soviet Union was the only major worry.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 26, 2017 7:23 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 26, 2017 theoutback 0

Special Report on Fox just did a piece on emp and the threat from N. Korea. They also mention that any legislation to harden the grid hasn’t made it out of committee. I’ll be very surprised if congress does anything! :angry: All the more reason to prep.

On a great note, I gave a good friend the book, One Second After, to read. He stopped by this afternoon. He read half of it so far and his mind is spinning. He asked a ton of questions. I think we have a new prepper on our hands. :thumbup:

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Fri May 26, 2017 5:32 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 26, 2017 theoutback 0

Special Report on Fox just did a piece on emp and the threat from N. Korea. They also mention that any legislation to harden the grid hasn’t made it out of committee. I’ll be very surprised if congress does anything! :angry: All the more reason to prep.

On a great note, I gave a good friend the book, One Second After, to read. He stopped by this afternoon. He read half of it so far and his mind is spinning. He asked a ton of questions. I think we have a new prepper on our hands. :thumbup:

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Fri May 26, 2017 5:32 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 26, 2017 dmwalsh568 0
Permafrost wrote:

dmwalsh568 wrote:What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

As if we don’t already live in a police state, you think it should be worse? It is already impossible to go anywhere without being put under surveillance, and illegally searched at any location the “authorities” deem important. Now you want even more cops harassing innocent people on the off chance they might catch someone.

Perhaps the answer is to recognize that the world is not a safe place, and it never has been. The answer is not more security, it is less security and a change in mentality. People die, if they didn’t there would be even worse overcrowding than there already is. To expect absolute safety is unrealistic. Perhaps it would be better to just live every day as if it was your last and get people to actually enjoy their lives so that when they die it is not such a big deal. It doesn’t matter if it is a car crash or a bear attack or cancer or falling through the ice or a terrorist attack, eventually everyone will die. On the day this attack happened more people died in car accidents worldwide than terrorist attacks, but nobody is suggesting that every car come with a cop to keep you safe. A free society is not a safe society, and a safe society is never free.

I wasn’t as precise in my wording as I should have been. :blush:

What I was trying to get across is the idea that these large venue events need to be treated like Airports, with a soft perimeter that is patrolled by police before you get to the actual security checkpoints and into the secure zone.

I was not trying to say random stops and searches anywhere are ok. I definitely think they are a violation of our rights.

But large venue events need to have an outer layer of security to reduce the risk of a mass casualty event. Nothing will eliminate risk, and it’s worth carefully balancing any need for safety against freedom of movement and personal liberty.

To circle back to the main topic, I suspect that if Manchester police had been patrolling an outer perimeter that they weren’t expecting an attack AFTER the concert, when in hindsight it provided a soft target. I think security plans for large events will be updated accordingly.

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Fri May 26, 2017 6:49 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 rickdun 0
ReadyMom wrote:

rickdun wrote:I was reading AlertsUSA and the UK has discovered several other bombs. They’re looking throughout the EU for the bomb maker. It went on to say threats are high in the US also with the holiday weekend coming up.

Fox reported that ISIS is showing pictures of large hotels in LA, Chicago, Las Vegas, NY city, etc., supposedly of propaganda targets.

I wish I was computer smarter so I could cut and post items, just too stupid I guess.

Thanks rick! You can post the links and we can follow them! Right click on address …. click on ‘copy link’ …. come back here … right click and click on ‘post’. -k

OH, thanks for trying ReadyMom, I tried, I failed, just don’t understand computers, but Reb gets one more click then I can get.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Thu May 25, 2017 6:17 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 rickdun 0
ReadyMom wrote:

rickdun wrote:I was reading AlertsUSA and the UK has discovered several other bombs. They’re looking throughout the EU for the bomb maker. It went on to say threats are high in the US also with the holiday weekend coming up.

Fox reported that ISIS is showing pictures of large hotels in LA, Chicago, Las Vegas, NY city, etc., supposedly of propaganda targets.

I wish I was computer smarter so I could cut and post items, just too stupid I guess.

Thanks rick! You can post the links and we can follow them! Right click on address …. click on ‘copy link’ …. come back here … right click and click on ‘post’. -k

OH, thanks for trying ReadyMom, I tried, I failed, just don’t understand computers, but Reb gets one more click then I can get.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Thu May 25, 2017 6:17 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Permafrost wrote:
People die, if they didn’t there would be even worse overcrowding than there already is.

Sure they do. Dying is a fact of life. It is the fact of life. Its the one certainty. Not even taxes are an absolute certainty. Ten out of ten people die. We can’t change the fact that people die. What we can change, or can work to change, is how people die which ideally would be from old age.

Permafrost wrote:
To expect absolute safety is unrealistic. Perhaps it would be better to just live every day as if it was your last and get people to actually enjoy their lives so that when they die it is not such a big deal. It doesn’t matter if it is a car crash or a bear attack or cancer or falling through the ice or a terrorist attack, eventually everyone will die.

Sure everybody will die and we can’t change that but like I said if people have to die its best to die from old age.

Permafrost wrote:
On the day this attack happened more people died in car accidents worldwide than terrorist attacks, but nobody is suggesting that every car come with a cop to keep you safe.

No, but we do have safety measures for driving that help cut down on car accidents. We have driving laws. We don’t allow people to drive while under the influence of alcohol, ect.

Permafrost wrote:
A free society is not a safe society, and a safe society is never free.

To some extent you’re right but also to some extent its safety that brings us freedom. For instance I am now free to get on an airplane and not be in fear that it will be taken over and crashed into a building because of extra safety measures taken after 9/11. Its a shame we needed that wakeup call in order to put such measures in place but at least we now have them.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Thu May 25, 2017 5:36 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Permafrost wrote:
People die, if they didn’t there would be even worse overcrowding than there already is.

Sure they do. Dying is a fact of life. It is the fact of life. Its the one certainty. Not even taxes are an absolute certainty. Ten out of ten people die. We can’t change the fact that people die. What we can change, or can work to change, is how people die which ideally would be from old age.

Permafrost wrote:
To expect absolute safety is unrealistic. Perhaps it would be better to just live every day as if it was your last and get people to actually enjoy their lives so that when they die it is not such a big deal. It doesn’t matter if it is a car crash or a bear attack or cancer or falling through the ice or a terrorist attack, eventually everyone will die.

Sure everybody will die and we can’t change that but like I said if people have to die its best to die from old age.

Permafrost wrote:
On the day this attack happened more people died in car accidents worldwide than terrorist attacks, but nobody is suggesting that every car come with a cop to keep you safe.

No, but we do have safety measures for driving that help cut down on car accidents. We have driving laws. We don’t allow people to drive while under the influence of alcohol, ect.

Permafrost wrote:
A free society is not a safe society, and a safe society is never free.

To some extent you’re right but also to some extent its safety that brings us freedom. For instance I am now free to get on an airplane and not be in fear that it will be taken over and crashed into a building because of extra safety measures taken after 9/11. Its a shame we needed that wakeup call in order to put such measures in place but at least we now have them.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Thu May 25, 2017 5:36 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0
rickdun wrote:
I was reading AlertsUSA and the UK has discovered several other bombs. They’re looking throughout the EU for the bomb maker. It went on to say threats are high in the US also with the holiday weekend coming up.

Fox reported that ISIS is showing pictures of large hotels in LA, Chicago, Las Vegas, NY city, etc., supposedly of propaganda targets.

I wish I was computer smarter so I could cut and post items, just too stupid I guess.

Thanks rick! You can post the links and we can follow them! Right click on address …. click on ‘copy link’ …. come back here … right click and click on ‘post’. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 25, 2017 4:41 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0
rickdun wrote:
I was reading AlertsUSA and the UK has discovered several other bombs. They’re looking throughout the EU for the bomb maker. It went on to say threats are high in the US also with the holiday weekend coming up.

Fox reported that ISIS is showing pictures of large hotels in LA, Chicago, Las Vegas, NY city, etc., supposedly of propaganda targets.

I wish I was computer smarter so I could cut and post items, just too stupid I guess.

Thanks rick! You can post the links and we can follow them! Right click on address …. click on ‘copy link’ …. come back here … right click and click on ‘post’. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 25, 2017 4:41 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 Permafrost 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

As if we don’t already live in a police state, you think it should be worse? It is already impossible to go anywhere without being put under surveillance, and illegally searched at any location the “authorities” deem important. Now you want even more cops harassing innocent people on the off chance they might catch someone.

Perhaps the answer is to recognize that the world is not a safe place, and it never has been. The answer is not more security, it is less security and a change in mentality. People die, if they didn’t there would be even worse overcrowding than there already is. To expect absolute safety is unrealistic. Perhaps it would be better to just live every day as if it was your last and get people to actually enjoy their lives so that when they die it is not such a big deal. It doesn’t matter if it is a car crash or a bear attack or cancer or falling through the ice or a terrorist attack, eventually everyone will die. On the day this attack happened more people died in car accidents worldwide than terrorist attacks, but nobody is suggesting that every car come with a cop to keep you safe. A free society is not a safe society, and a safe society is never free.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu May 25, 2017 4:16 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 Permafrost 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

As if we don’t already live in a police state, you think it should be worse? It is already impossible to go anywhere without being put under surveillance, and illegally searched at any location the “authorities” deem important. Now you want even more cops harassing innocent people on the off chance they might catch someone.

Perhaps the answer is to recognize that the world is not a safe place, and it never has been. The answer is not more security, it is less security and a change in mentality. People die, if they didn’t there would be even worse overcrowding than there already is. To expect absolute safety is unrealistic. Perhaps it would be better to just live every day as if it was your last and get people to actually enjoy their lives so that when they die it is not such a big deal. It doesn’t matter if it is a car crash or a bear attack or cancer or falling through the ice or a terrorist attack, eventually everyone will die. On the day this attack happened more people died in car accidents worldwide than terrorist attacks, but nobody is suggesting that every car come with a cop to keep you safe. A free society is not a safe society, and a safe society is never free.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu May 25, 2017 4:16 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 rickdun 0

I was reading AlertsUSA and the UK has discovered several other bombs. They’re looking throughout the EU for the bomb maker. It went on to say threats are high in the US also with the holiday weekend coming up.

Fox reported that ISIS is showing pictures of large hotels in LA, Chicago, Las Vegas, NY city, etc., supposedly of propaganda targets.

I wish I was computer smarter so I could cut and post items, just too stupid I guess.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Thu May 25, 2017 2:44 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 rickdun 0

I was reading AlertsUSA and the UK has discovered several other bombs. They’re looking throughout the EU for the bomb maker. It went on to say threats are high in the US also with the holiday weekend coming up.

Fox reported that ISIS is showing pictures of large hotels in LA, Chicago, Las Vegas, NY city, etc., supposedly of propaganda targets.

I wish I was computer smarter so I could cut and post items, just too stupid I guess.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Thu May 25, 2017 2:44 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

I had heard, on the radio yesterday, that there was some concern expressed over possible info leaking via the USA. Now this, today:

Manchester bombing: Trump orders probe of investigation leaks
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/wor … 102136504/

MANCHESTER, England — President Trump ordered the Justice Department to probe alleged information leaks by U.S. officials regarding the deadly concert bombing investigation here after British authorities announced Thursday they would stop sharing intelligence due to leaks of confidential and sensitive details about the case.

“I am asking the Department of Justice and other relevant agencies to launch a complete review of this matter, and if appropriate, the culprit should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” Trump said in a statement released by the White House. “There is no relationship we cherish more than the Special Relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom.”

The decision to halt sharing information with counterparts in the United States comes after a series of revelations about the case that first surfaced in U.S. media including USA TODAY, such as the name of the suicide bomber, Salman Abedi.

Late Wednesday, TheNew York Times published images of what appeared to be debris from the device used to kill 22 people at Manchester Arena following a performance by U.S. pop star Ariana Grande, a move that prompted a rebuke from Britain’s National Counter Terrorism Policing unit.

“We greatly value the important relationships we have with our trusted intelligence, law enforcement and security partners around the world. These relationships enable us to collaborate and share privileged and sensitive information that allows us to defeat terrorism and protect the public at home and abroad,” it said in a statement.

“When that trust is breached it undermines these relationships, and undermines our investigations and the confidence of victims, witnesses and their families. This damage is even greater when it involves unauthorized disclosure of potential evidence in the middle of a major counter terrorism investigation.”

ImageThis photo obtained May 24, 2017 from The New York Times who got it from British Law Enforcement, shows what the bomber in the Manchester terrorist attack appeared to have carried as a powerful explosive in a lightweight metal container concealed within a blue Karrimor backpack, and to have held a small detonator in his left hand, according to preliminary information gathered by British authorities in Manchester, England. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

The BBC first reported that a decision was made to temporarily freeze disclosing details about the case with U.S. authorities. It said that there was “disbelief and astonishment across the British government” about the leaks to U.S. media, which they felt could compromise the investigation.

Prime Minister Theresa May was expected to raise the issue with President Trump at a NATO meeting in Brussels later Thursday.

Authorities identified Abedi, 22, who was born and raised in Manchester and has Libyan parents, as the suicide bomber in Monday night’s attack. Authorities indicated he may have been part of a terrorist network intent on carrying out further deadly assaults in and around the Manchester area. He died at the scene.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack. The claim could not be verified.

Queen Elizabeth II visited the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital on Thursday, meeting with staff and some of the attack victims. She toured the wards and spoke to medical staff. The hospital said 12 children were still being treated there.

“Her Majesty meets Evie Mills, aged 14, from Harrogate, her mum, Karen and dad, Craig at the hospital in Manchester,” the Royal Family tweeted with a photo. And later: “Whilst at the hospital in Manchester, The Queen spoke to 12-year-old Amy Barlow, from Rawtenstall, and her mum, Kathy.”

Police said eight men remain in custody following the attack Monday night. Police on Thursday continued to raid locations across the city, convinced the bombmaker could still be on the loose. Security services have warned the public that more attacks could be imminent.

About 1,000 soldiers were deployed Wednesday around the country as the terrorist threat level was raised to “critical” in the wake of the bombing.

Multiple bomb scares occurred across Manchester on Thursday, including in the suburb of Trafford where the army was called to an area near a college.

The search for accomplices has also extended to Libya. Abedi’s younger brother and father were detained in Tripoli on Wednesday, and police arrested his older brother in Manchester earlier in the week.

Manchester and the rest of the U.K. held a minute of silence at 11 a.m. (5 a.m. ET) Thursday in remembrance of those who lost their lives or were affected by the attack.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 25, 2017 10:20 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

I had heard, on the radio yesterday, that there was some concern expressed over possible info leaking via the USA. Now this, today:

Manchester bombing: Trump orders probe of investigation leaks
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/wor … 102136504/

MANCHESTER, England — President Trump ordered the Justice Department to probe alleged information leaks by U.S. officials regarding the deadly concert bombing investigation here after British authorities announced Thursday they would stop sharing intelligence due to leaks of confidential and sensitive details about the case.

“I am asking the Department of Justice and other relevant agencies to launch a complete review of this matter, and if appropriate, the culprit should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” Trump said in a statement released by the White House. “There is no relationship we cherish more than the Special Relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom.”

The decision to halt sharing information with counterparts in the United States comes after a series of revelations about the case that first surfaced in U.S. media including USA TODAY, such as the name of the suicide bomber, Salman Abedi.

Late Wednesday, TheNew York Times published images of what appeared to be debris from the device used to kill 22 people at Manchester Arena following a performance by U.S. pop star Ariana Grande, a move that prompted a rebuke from Britain’s National Counter Terrorism Policing unit.

“We greatly value the important relationships we have with our trusted intelligence, law enforcement and security partners around the world. These relationships enable us to collaborate and share privileged and sensitive information that allows us to defeat terrorism and protect the public at home and abroad,” it said in a statement.

“When that trust is breached it undermines these relationships, and undermines our investigations and the confidence of victims, witnesses and their families. This damage is even greater when it involves unauthorized disclosure of potential evidence in the middle of a major counter terrorism investigation.”

ImageThis photo obtained May 24, 2017 from The New York Times who got it from British Law Enforcement, shows what the bomber in the Manchester terrorist attack appeared to have carried as a powerful explosive in a lightweight metal container concealed within a blue Karrimor backpack, and to have held a small detonator in his left hand, according to preliminary information gathered by British authorities in Manchester, England. (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

The BBC first reported that a decision was made to temporarily freeze disclosing details about the case with U.S. authorities. It said that there was “disbelief and astonishment across the British government” about the leaks to U.S. media, which they felt could compromise the investigation.

Prime Minister Theresa May was expected to raise the issue with President Trump at a NATO meeting in Brussels later Thursday.

Authorities identified Abedi, 22, who was born and raised in Manchester and has Libyan parents, as the suicide bomber in Monday night’s attack. Authorities indicated he may have been part of a terrorist network intent on carrying out further deadly assaults in and around the Manchester area. He died at the scene.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack. The claim could not be verified.

Queen Elizabeth II visited the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital on Thursday, meeting with staff and some of the attack victims. She toured the wards and spoke to medical staff. The hospital said 12 children were still being treated there.

“Her Majesty meets Evie Mills, aged 14, from Harrogate, her mum, Karen and dad, Craig at the hospital in Manchester,” the Royal Family tweeted with a photo. And later: “Whilst at the hospital in Manchester, The Queen spoke to 12-year-old Amy Barlow, from Rawtenstall, and her mum, Kathy.”

Police said eight men remain in custody following the attack Monday night. Police on Thursday continued to raid locations across the city, convinced the bombmaker could still be on the loose. Security services have warned the public that more attacks could be imminent.

About 1,000 soldiers were deployed Wednesday around the country as the terrorist threat level was raised to “critical” in the wake of the bombing.

Multiple bomb scares occurred across Manchester on Thursday, including in the suburb of Trafford where the army was called to an area near a college.

The search for accomplices has also extended to Libya. Abedi’s younger brother and father were detained in Tripoli on Wednesday, and police arrested his older brother in Manchester earlier in the week.

Manchester and the rest of the U.K. held a minute of silence at 11 a.m. (5 a.m. ET) Thursday in remembrance of those who lost their lives or were affected by the attack.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 25, 2017 10:20 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 Photon Guy 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
That sounds great, but in this incident (and the prior one in France with multiple bombers) the bomber didn’t get inside the venue. He attacked a soft target outside the security perimeter, but where large numbers of people would be congregating at least for a short time. It’s similar to the attack at the airport in Brussels where the bombers exploded their devices in a departure hall, outside of the secure zone.

What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

Even with police patrolling the soft zones it can be hard for them to detect potential bombers before its too late. The bomber could simply be somebody wearing a backpack and could have the bomb concealed in the backpack as it was in the Manchester case. Are they going to stop and search everybody wearing a backpack in the soft zone? In the USA that would violate certain civil rights and it would also cost lots of time and manpower. Also, a potential bomber doesn’t have to be wearing a backpack, they could have the bomb hidden under their clothes or somewhere on their person. Are they going to stop and search everybody who wanders into the soft zone? That would be an even greater violation of civil rights and would cost even more time and manpower than just searching the people with backpacks. You might have a good point about police patrolling the soft zones but these are points to take into consideration.

As for moving the security zone further out that, as you state you’re against that but might also be something to take into consideration. Yes the unsecured perimeter does become larger but that also means that it will be less dense. With a larger perimeter that means people going through the perimeter will be more spread out so if a bomber does strike they will get less people.

dmwalsh568 wrote:
I barely know where to start on this statement, since it’s one heck of a slippery slope. It’s easy to tell bad guys AFTER they’ve done something bad, but telling who’s bad versus someone disgruntled or just someone spouting off garbage online is one heck of a task. Are you really for giving TPTB carte blanche to lock up folks who haven’t done anything more than talk? Or why stop there, what’s the mercenary phrase? Kill them all and let God sort them out. :eek:

All too often its hard to tell who the bad guy is but also, all too often they know something is wrong with somebody and they do nothing about it. Adam Lanza, they knew something was wrong with him. Had he been committed as he should’ve been those children at the Sandy Hook Elementary School that he killed would still be alive. James Eagan Holmes same thing, they knew there was something wrong with him. Had he been committed those people he killed at the movie theater would still be alive. At least in the USA the problem is that we let sickos run loose so they can hurt others. Sometimes you can’t tell the sickos from the level headed people but sometimes you can, its the times that you can and nothing is done about it that really gets to me.

dmwalsh568 wrote:
I know it’s still early in the investigation, but it appears that the bomber just came back from Libya AND he was known to authorities. That should have prompted more action since Libya is basically a failed state these days and while his trip might have been an innocent one to visit relatives, it could also have been to get training for this attack. I suspect this was a missed opportunity to stop an attack before it happened. Hopefully all the security forces both in the UK and USA are paying attention and learning from others mistakes.

Visiting Libya might not be grounds to investigate somebody but you said the bomber was also known to the authorities. You’ve got a point when you said that this should’ve prompted more action although the investigation is still ongoing and we don’t yet have all the facts.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Thu May 25, 2017 8:18 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 Photon Guy 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
That sounds great, but in this incident (and the prior one in France with multiple bombers) the bomber didn’t get inside the venue. He attacked a soft target outside the security perimeter, but where large numbers of people would be congregating at least for a short time. It’s similar to the attack at the airport in Brussels where the bombers exploded their devices in a departure hall, outside of the secure zone.

What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

Even with police patrolling the soft zones it can be hard for them to detect potential bombers before its too late. The bomber could simply be somebody wearing a backpack and could have the bomb concealed in the backpack as it was in the Manchester case. Are they going to stop and search everybody wearing a backpack in the soft zone? In the USA that would violate certain civil rights and it would also cost lots of time and manpower. Also, a potential bomber doesn’t have to be wearing a backpack, they could have the bomb hidden under their clothes or somewhere on their person. Are they going to stop and search everybody who wanders into the soft zone? That would be an even greater violation of civil rights and would cost even more time and manpower than just searching the people with backpacks. You might have a good point about police patrolling the soft zones but these are points to take into consideration.

As for moving the security zone further out that, as you state you’re against that but might also be something to take into consideration. Yes the unsecured perimeter does become larger but that also means that it will be less dense. With a larger perimeter that means people going through the perimeter will be more spread out so if a bomber does strike they will get less people.

dmwalsh568 wrote:
I barely know where to start on this statement, since it’s one heck of a slippery slope. It’s easy to tell bad guys AFTER they’ve done something bad, but telling who’s bad versus someone disgruntled or just someone spouting off garbage online is one heck of a task. Are you really for giving TPTB carte blanche to lock up folks who haven’t done anything more than talk? Or why stop there, what’s the mercenary phrase? Kill them all and let God sort them out. :eek:

All too often its hard to tell who the bad guy is but also, all too often they know something is wrong with somebody and they do nothing about it. Adam Lanza, they knew something was wrong with him. Had he been committed as he should’ve been those children at the Sandy Hook Elementary School that he killed would still be alive. James Eagan Holmes same thing, they knew there was something wrong with him. Had he been committed those people he killed at the movie theater would still be alive. At least in the USA the problem is that we let sickos run loose so they can hurt others. Sometimes you can’t tell the sickos from the level headed people but sometimes you can, its the times that you can and nothing is done about it that really gets to me.

dmwalsh568 wrote:
I know it’s still early in the investigation, but it appears that the bomber just came back from Libya AND he was known to authorities. That should have prompted more action since Libya is basically a failed state these days and while his trip might have been an innocent one to visit relatives, it could also have been to get training for this attack. I suspect this was a missed opportunity to stop an attack before it happened. Hopefully all the security forces both in the UK and USA are paying attention and learning from others mistakes.

Visiting Libya might not be grounds to investigate somebody but you said the bomber was also known to the authorities. You’ve got a point when you said that this should’ve prompted more action although the investigation is still ongoing and we don’t yet have all the facts.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Thu May 25, 2017 8:18 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 dmwalsh568 0
Photon Guy wrote:

dmwalsh568 wrote:Gun rights are important to protect, but this is the wrong incident to use in their defense.

Unless someone had noticed he was carrying a bomb then the first sign of a bad guy would be the flash, boom and then the moans of the injured and dying.

Similar situation with someone burning down a bar. I certainly wouldn’t waste time trying to shoot at someone setting fire to the building I was in – getting out is job one. Then you can make decisions on the best course of action. Of course if you’re in an illegal social club with only one way in and out, you’re making poor choices that might reduce your life expectancy….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Land_fire

Well the main point I was trying to make is that both in this recent atrocity in Manchester and the act of arson back in 1990 in NY that in both cases they didn’t need guns to do what they did. There are many other cases and examples of people causing mayhem and killing multitudes without the use of guns, most notably 9/11. You are right that even if they had security with guns in Manchester they wouldn’t know or be able to do anything about the bad guy with the bomb until it was too late. If you ask me what they should have is better security for people entering such events. People should have to go through those same machines that they’ve got at airports and their belongings should be searched for anything dangerous, much like what you have to go through at an airport, or what I had to go through in Atlanta, GA.

That sounds great, but in this incident (and the prior one in France with multiple bombers) the bomber didn’t get inside the venue. He attacked a soft target outside the security perimeter, but where large numbers of people would be congregating at least for a short time. It’s similar to the attack at the airport in Brussels where the bombers exploded their devices in a departure hall, outside of the secure zone.

What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

ref:
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-manchester-40008389
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Brussels_bombings

Photon Guy wrote:
The other point Im making is that there are bad people in this world and if they’re allowed to run loose they are going to find ways to harm innocents somehow or another no matter what they have or don’t have access to.

I barely know where to start on this statement, since it’s one heck of a slippery slope. It’s easy to tell bad guys AFTER they’ve done something bad, but telling who’s bad versus someone disgruntled or just someone spouting off garbage online is one heck of a task. Are you really for giving TPTB carte blanche to lock up folks who haven’t done anything more than talk? Or why stop there, what’s the mercenary phrase? Kill them all and let God sort them out. :eek:

I know it’s still early in the investigation, but it appears that the bomber just came back from Libya AND he was known to authorities. That should have prompted more action since Libya is basically a failed state these days and while his trip might have been an innocent one to visit relatives, it could also have been to get training for this attack. I suspect this was a missed opportunity to stop an attack before it happened. Hopefully all the security forces both in the UK and USA are paying attention and learning from others mistakes.

ref:
http://www.thisdayinquotes.com/2011/07/ … m-out.html
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-manchester-40008389

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Thu May 25, 2017 7:02 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 dmwalsh568 0
Photon Guy wrote:

dmwalsh568 wrote:Gun rights are important to protect, but this is the wrong incident to use in their defense.

Unless someone had noticed he was carrying a bomb then the first sign of a bad guy would be the flash, boom and then the moans of the injured and dying.

Similar situation with someone burning down a bar. I certainly wouldn’t waste time trying to shoot at someone setting fire to the building I was in – getting out is job one. Then you can make decisions on the best course of action. Of course if you’re in an illegal social club with only one way in and out, you’re making poor choices that might reduce your life expectancy….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Land_fire

Well the main point I was trying to make is that both in this recent atrocity in Manchester and the act of arson back in 1990 in NY that in both cases they didn’t need guns to do what they did. There are many other cases and examples of people causing mayhem and killing multitudes without the use of guns, most notably 9/11. You are right that even if they had security with guns in Manchester they wouldn’t know or be able to do anything about the bad guy with the bomb until it was too late. If you ask me what they should have is better security for people entering such events. People should have to go through those same machines that they’ve got at airports and their belongings should be searched for anything dangerous, much like what you have to go through at an airport, or what I had to go through in Atlanta, GA.

That sounds great, but in this incident (and the prior one in France with multiple bombers) the bomber didn’t get inside the venue. He attacked a soft target outside the security perimeter, but where large numbers of people would be congregating at least for a short time. It’s similar to the attack at the airport in Brussels where the bombers exploded their devices in a departure hall, outside of the secure zone.

What really needs to happen is to have police patrolling in the soft zones outside of secured areas to try and deter or if possible catch suicide bombers before they can blow everyone up, like happens in Israel (our security forces really need to reach out and get some lessons from the IDF.) And before anyone suggests moving the security zone out further- that just moves the soft targets further out and means more security is needed to have a chance of catching folks since the unsecured perimeter becomes that much larger.

ref:
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-manchester-40008389
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Brussels_bombings

Photon Guy wrote:
The other point Im making is that there are bad people in this world and if they’re allowed to run loose they are going to find ways to harm innocents somehow or another no matter what they have or don’t have access to.

I barely know where to start on this statement, since it’s one heck of a slippery slope. It’s easy to tell bad guys AFTER they’ve done something bad, but telling who’s bad versus someone disgruntled or just someone spouting off garbage online is one heck of a task. Are you really for giving TPTB carte blanche to lock up folks who haven’t done anything more than talk? Or why stop there, what’s the mercenary phrase? Kill them all and let God sort them out. :eek:

I know it’s still early in the investigation, but it appears that the bomber just came back from Libya AND he was known to authorities. That should have prompted more action since Libya is basically a failed state these days and while his trip might have been an innocent one to visit relatives, it could also have been to get training for this attack. I suspect this was a missed opportunity to stop an attack before it happened. Hopefully all the security forces both in the UK and USA are paying attention and learning from others mistakes.

ref:
http://www.thisdayinquotes.com/2011/07/ … m-out.html
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-manchester-40008389

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Thu May 25, 2017 7:02 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 25, 2017 kenjabroni 0

Europe as a whole needs to wake up and quit letting the muslims have their no go zones and sharia courts. There are a lot of peaceful caring good muslims out there, but if they arent helping stop this nonsense then they are part of the problem too. You can love your religion and respect others for theirs without thinking everyone else is beneath you and its your job to rid the world of them.

This stuff needs to stop. Facebook outrage and all these liberal ninnies on the news need to wake up to the real world. This stuff isnt going away by giving them hugs and making them feel like they belong.

Statistics: Posted by kenjabroni — Wed May 24, 2017 7:23 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 24, 2017 Photon Guy 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
Gun rights are important to protect, but this is the wrong incident to use in their defense.

Unless someone had noticed he was carrying a bomb then the first sign of a bad guy would be the flash, boom and then the moans of the injured and dying.

Similar situation with someone burning down a bar. I certainly wouldn’t waste time trying to shoot at someone setting fire to the building I was in – getting out is job one. Then you can make decisions on the best course of action. Of course if you’re in an illegal social club with only one way in and out, you’re making poor choices that might reduce your life expectancy….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Land_fire

Well the main point I was trying to make is that both in this recent atrocity in Manchester and the act of arson back in 1990 in NY that in both cases they didn’t need guns to do what they did. There are many other cases and examples of people causing mayhem and killing multitudes without the use of guns, most notably 9/11. You are right that even if they had security with guns in Manchester they wouldn’t know or be able to do anything about the bad guy with the bomb until it was too late. If you ask me what they should have is better security for people entering such events. People should have to go through those same machines that they’ve got at airports and their belongings should be searched for anything dangerous, much like what you have to go through at an airport, or what I had to go through in Atlanta, GA.

The other point Im making is that there are bad people in this world and if they’re allowed to run loose they are going to find ways to harm innocents somehow or another no matter what they have or don’t have access to.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Wed May 24, 2017 3:32 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 24, 2017 dmwalsh568 0
Photon Guy wrote:
So I was thinking, had this happened in the USA and had the bad guy used guns instead of a bomb that there would be yet another fit of hysteria with people calling for more gun control. This happened in England which has among the tightest gun control in the world and the bad guy didn’t need a gun to cause the carnage he caused. This was done with a homemade bomb that was made from stuff that could no doubt be purchased at most hardware stores. The point is, bad people who want to harm others are going to find ways to do it. Limiting the availability of guns wont help as it didn’t in this case. Back in 1990 there was a case where somebody lit up a dance club in New York using gasoline purchased from a nearby gas station, 87 people were killed. By making guns harder to get for good people all it does is limit their rights and their ability to fight back against the bad guys while the bad guys will find a way to cause harm with or without guns as in this case.

Gun rights are important to protect, but this is the wrong incident to use in their defense.

Unless someone had noticed he was carrying a bomb then the first sign of a bad guy would be the flash, boom and then the moans of the injured and dying.

Similar situation with someone burning down a bar. I certainly wouldn’t waste time trying to shoot at someone setting fire to the building I was in – getting out is job one. Then you can make decisions on the best course of action. Of course if you’re in an illegal social club with only one way in and out, you’re making poor choices that might reduce your life expectancy….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Land_fire

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Wed May 24, 2017 12:44 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 24, 2017 Photon Guy 0

So I was thinking, had this happened in the USA and had the bad guy used guns instead of a bomb that there would be yet another fit of hysteria with people calling for more gun control. This happened in England which has among the tightest gun control in the world and the bad guy didn’t need a gun to cause the carnage he caused. This was done with a homemade bomb that was made from stuff that could no doubt be purchased at most hardware stores. The point is, bad people who want to harm others are going to find ways to do it. Limiting the availability of guns wont help as it didn’t in this case. Back in 1990 there was a case where somebody lit up a dance club in New York using gasoline purchased from a nearby gas station, 87 people were killed. By making guns harder to get for good people all it does is limit their rights and their ability to fight back against the bad guys while the bad guys will find a way to cause harm with or without guns as in this case.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Wed May 24, 2017 11:39 am


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 24, 2017 ReadyMom 0

MORE on the Mass Production:

Image

North Korea says it will mass-produce ballistic missile
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/201 … 102007226/

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Monday ordered mass production of a medium-range ballistic missile successfully tested a day earlier that is capable of reaching several U.S. bases in the region.

State-run KCNA news service said Kim ordered Sunday’s test launch from an observation post and “expressed his great satisfaction” with the results.

“Saying with pride that the missile’s rate of hits is very accurate and Pukguksong-2 is a successful strategic weapon, he approved the deployment of this weapon system for action,” KCNA said.

David Wright, a senior scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, has been monitoring North Korea’s missile development for decades and says Pyongyang’s program is making alarming strides.

“They are showing more sophistication,” Wright told USA TODAY. “We need to start a dialogue. We are simply running out of time.”

Sunday’s test came one week after Pyongyang successfully tested another type of missile that it boasted was capable of reaching the U.S. armed with a nuclear warhead.

The United Nations Security Council will hold a closed-door session Tuesday to discuss the test. France’s U.N. ambassador Francois Delattre said Pyongyang’s behavior demands “a swift and firm reaction” from the Security Council, including tougher sanctions, the Associated Press reported. Last week, the Security Council “strongly condemned” Pyongyang’s testing and urged members to fully implement stiff U.N. sanctions already in place.

The test Sunday involved a medium-range ballistic missile that has a shorter range than others fired by the communist regime in recent months, the White House said. The path of the missile, which flew about 310 miles before landing in the Sea of Japan, was monitored by the South Korean military and the U.S. Pacific Command.

Wright said that based on trajectory the missile appeared to have a range of about 800 miles — perhaps sufficient to reach U.S. military installations across South Korea and Japan but not the U.S. territory of Guam. He said Pyongyang is developing two types of missiles — the solid-fuel Pukguksong-2 missile that can be fired from a mobile launcher and the liquid-fuel Hwasong-12, tested a week earlier, that involves a more complicated launch structure.

Pacific Command Cmdr. David Benham said an assessment of the tests revealed the launches did not pose a threat to North America. But he emphasized that U.S. officials were closely monitoring the tests and pledged “ironclad commitment” to allies in the region. Such language has become standard following a series of North Korean missile tests in recent months.

North Korea has been stepping up its missile testing, apparently attempting to develop a missile capable of reaching the United States. Kim has frequently expressed outrage at the U.S., most recently for massive military exercises conducted with South Korea and for U.S. deployment of an anti-missile system designed to counter the Pyongyang missile threat.

The Trump administration has pressed China, North Korea’s closest ally, to rein in Pyongyang. Wright said he thinks Kim may be ready to make a deal, and the rush of tests in recent weeks is probably the North’s effort to “make what progress they can before they freeze things.”

Wright said President Trump brings “fresh eyes” to the conflict but also understands what previous presidents have learned: There is no realistic military option. North Korea is capable of causing major damage to South Korea and Japan in the event of war, Wright said.

“I think this guy (Kim) is rational, but he’s unpredictable,” Wright said. “Ramping up sanctions and working with China to get some sort of talks started is the only way forward.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed May 24, 2017 9:59 am


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 24, 2017 ReadyMom 0

MORE on the Mass Production:

Image

North Korea says it will mass-produce ballistic missile
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/201 … 102007226/

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Monday ordered mass production of a medium-range ballistic missile successfully tested a day earlier that is capable of reaching several U.S. bases in the region.

State-run KCNA news service said Kim ordered Sunday’s test launch from an observation post and “expressed his great satisfaction” with the results.

“Saying with pride that the missile’s rate of hits is very accurate and Pukguksong-2 is a successful strategic weapon, he approved the deployment of this weapon system for action,” KCNA said.

David Wright, a senior scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, has been monitoring North Korea’s missile development for decades and says Pyongyang’s program is making alarming strides.

“They are showing more sophistication,” Wright told USA TODAY. “We need to start a dialogue. We are simply running out of time.”

Sunday’s test came one week after Pyongyang successfully tested another type of missile that it boasted was capable of reaching the U.S. armed with a nuclear warhead.

The United Nations Security Council will hold a closed-door session Tuesday to discuss the test. France’s U.N. ambassador Francois Delattre said Pyongyang’s behavior demands “a swift and firm reaction” from the Security Council, including tougher sanctions, the Associated Press reported. Last week, the Security Council “strongly condemned” Pyongyang’s testing and urged members to fully implement stiff U.N. sanctions already in place.

The test Sunday involved a medium-range ballistic missile that has a shorter range than others fired by the communist regime in recent months, the White House said. The path of the missile, which flew about 310 miles before landing in the Sea of Japan, was monitored by the South Korean military and the U.S. Pacific Command.

Wright said that based on trajectory the missile appeared to have a range of about 800 miles — perhaps sufficient to reach U.S. military installations across South Korea and Japan but not the U.S. territory of Guam. He said Pyongyang is developing two types of missiles — the solid-fuel Pukguksong-2 missile that can be fired from a mobile launcher and the liquid-fuel Hwasong-12, tested a week earlier, that involves a more complicated launch structure.

Pacific Command Cmdr. David Benham said an assessment of the tests revealed the launches did not pose a threat to North America. But he emphasized that U.S. officials were closely monitoring the tests and pledged “ironclad commitment” to allies in the region. Such language has become standard following a series of North Korean missile tests in recent months.

North Korea has been stepping up its missile testing, apparently attempting to develop a missile capable of reaching the United States. Kim has frequently expressed outrage at the U.S., most recently for massive military exercises conducted with South Korea and for U.S. deployment of an anti-missile system designed to counter the Pyongyang missile threat.

The Trump administration has pressed China, North Korea’s closest ally, to rein in Pyongyang. Wright said he thinks Kim may be ready to make a deal, and the rush of tests in recent weeks is probably the North’s effort to “make what progress they can before they freeze things.”

Wright said President Trump brings “fresh eyes” to the conflict but also understands what previous presidents have learned: There is no realistic military option. North Korea is capable of causing major damage to South Korea and Japan in the event of war, Wright said.

“I think this guy (Kim) is rational, but he’s unpredictable,” Wright said. “Ramping up sanctions and working with China to get some sort of talks started is the only way forward.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed May 24, 2017 9:59 am


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 24, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Image

N. Korea announces Pukguksong-2 launch, says missile can now be “mass-produced”
https://www.nknews.org/2017/05/n-korea- … -produced/

Dagyum Ji
May 21st, 2017

UPDATE: This article was amended at 1145 KST to include comments from Kim Dong-yub, Professor at Institute for Far Eastern Studies, Kyungnam University and South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS).

Kim Jong Un on Sunday supervised North Korea’s second test launch of the Pukguksong-2 ground-to-ground strategic ballistic missile and approved its deployment “for action”, the state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported on Monday.

Pyongyang launched a medium-range ballistic missile (MRBM) from the country’s northwest on Sunday afternoon local time, U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) confirmed on Sunday.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) had previously reported that North Korea had launched the missile at 1659 KST near Pukchang in South Pyongan province. The missile traveled around 500 km and landed in the Sea of Japan, according to reports.

The Pukguksong-2 (KN-15), which was described as a ground-to-ground medium-to-long range strategic ballistic missile, was first launched on February 12. South Korea’s JCS previously described the missile as a new type of solid-fuel intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM).

The North said this test was the “final launch test” before its deployment to the Korean People’s Army (KPA).

“The test-fire of Pukguksong-2 was aimed to finally verify all the technical indexes of the weapon system and thoroughly examine its adaptability under various battle conditions, before its deployment to military units for action,” KCNA said in an English-language dispatch.

Kim analyzed the results of the test-launch with workers at an observation post and expressed his “great satisfaction”.

“Saying with pride that the missile’s rate of hits is very accurate and Pukguksong-2 is a successful strategic weapon, [Kim] approved the deployment of this weapon system for action,” KCNA said.

“Now that its tactical and technical data met the requirements of the Party, this type of missile should be rapidly mass-produced in a serial way to arm the KPA Strategic Force,” KCNA reported Kim as having said.

General Kim Rak Gyom, commander of the KPA Strategic Force, also reportedly attended the test launch.

KCNA gave more details about the technical aspects of the test in a Korean-language dispatch.

The reliability and accuracy of the cold launch system from a tracked transporter erector launcher (TEL), the working and operation features of the high thrust solid fuel-powered engines, as well as the guidance and stabilization systems of the missile “during its active flight”, among other things, have been “completely verified,” a report said.

The accuracy of the attitude control system on the missile can be tracked by image data transmitted from the camera installed on the nuclear warhead, KCNA added.

“The whole world looks beautiful and feels happy when I see the earth filmed by a rocket launched by us,” Kim Jong Un reportedly said after looking at photos of the earth transmitted by the rocket’s camera “in real time.”

KCNA said Kim also emphasized that the North should push ahead with the “diversification and advancement” of its nuclear forces, with the aim of making North Korea’s enemies “become crazy and never awake to their full mind.”

One expert said North Korea’s insistence that the missile could now be “mass-produced” was significant, but added that the claim could not yet be verified.

“To put things into proper perspective – Yes, the Pukguksong-2 is reliable (by DPRK standards),” said Tal Inbar, head of the Space & UAV center at the Fisher Institute for Air and Space Strategic Studies. “Yes, they could start mass production, but no, we cannot verify that at the moment.”

In August, the North claimed a test of a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) had been a success, describing it as having been carried out without “adverse impact” on neighboring countries.

Land-based testing of the Pukguksong-1 SLBM began as early as 2013, when a test-stand at Sinpo was built, and the first confirmed submerged test launch was conducted in May 2015.

The Pukguksong-1 SLBM is believed to be based on the visually-similar Soviet-designed R-27 Zyb (NATO reporting name SS-N-6) SLBM.

Another expert said the rapid testing and deployment of the Pukguksong-2 was concerning.

“It is a solid propellant missile that could be harder to detect before launch,” Anthony Ruggiero, a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, said.

“The Trump administration should sanction North Korea and its supporters, especially China, before Pyongyang completes the development of its road-mobile intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). Last week’s test was a step forward in the ICBM program and Washington should act before it is too late.”

Kim Dong-yub, a Professor at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies, Kyungnam University, said the missile would likely “not have been much improved.”

“I think the missile was relaunched after correcting and making up for defects which were found in test-firing conducted in February,” Kim told NK News.

Kim said both missiles fired in February and May reached an altitude of around 560km and traveled 500km, and that the Pukguksong-2 may be capable of flying between 2000 and 2500 km.

“The range of Pukguksong-2 missile is behind that of the Musudan missile, which can target Guam and has an estimated range of between 3000-4000 km,” Kim said. “But given that the Pukguksong-2 missile didn’t use 100% of its thrust, the missile should be classified as a solid-fueled Musudan ballistic missile.”

Kim also suggested the possibility that this launch could “lead to the development of the solid propellant ICBM,” arguing that the first stage of KN-14, the liquid-fuel ICBM, is made of a cluster of two Musudan engines.

“It’s likely to create the first-stage propulsion of ICBM by clustering two to four engines of Pukguksong-2 missile.”

Meanwhile, South Korea’s JCS argued on Monday that “additional verification” is needed to confirm the warhead’s stable re-entry into the atmosphere.

“But South Korean and U.S. information authorities estimate that the North obtained meaningful date to improve the reliability of missile technology through the missile launch conducted yesterday,” JCS spokesperson Roh Jae-cheon told media during a regular news briefing.

Edited by Oliver Hotham

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed May 24, 2017 9:51 am


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 24, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Image

N. Korea announces Pukguksong-2 launch, says missile can now be “mass-produced”
https://www.nknews.org/2017/05/n-korea- … -produced/

Dagyum Ji
May 21st, 2017

UPDATE: This article was amended at 1145 KST to include comments from Kim Dong-yub, Professor at Institute for Far Eastern Studies, Kyungnam University and South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS).

Kim Jong Un on Sunday supervised North Korea’s second test launch of the Pukguksong-2 ground-to-ground strategic ballistic missile and approved its deployment “for action”, the state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported on Monday.

Pyongyang launched a medium-range ballistic missile (MRBM) from the country’s northwest on Sunday afternoon local time, U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) confirmed on Sunday.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) had previously reported that North Korea had launched the missile at 1659 KST near Pukchang in South Pyongan province. The missile traveled around 500 km and landed in the Sea of Japan, according to reports.

The Pukguksong-2 (KN-15), which was described as a ground-to-ground medium-to-long range strategic ballistic missile, was first launched on February 12. South Korea’s JCS previously described the missile as a new type of solid-fuel intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBM).

The North said this test was the “final launch test” before its deployment to the Korean People’s Army (KPA).

“The test-fire of Pukguksong-2 was aimed to finally verify all the technical indexes of the weapon system and thoroughly examine its adaptability under various battle conditions, before its deployment to military units for action,” KCNA said in an English-language dispatch.

Kim analyzed the results of the test-launch with workers at an observation post and expressed his “great satisfaction”.

“Saying with pride that the missile’s rate of hits is very accurate and Pukguksong-2 is a successful strategic weapon, [Kim] approved the deployment of this weapon system for action,” KCNA said.

“Now that its tactical and technical data met the requirements of the Party, this type of missile should be rapidly mass-produced in a serial way to arm the KPA Strategic Force,” KCNA reported Kim as having said.

General Kim Rak Gyom, commander of the KPA Strategic Force, also reportedly attended the test launch.

KCNA gave more details about the technical aspects of the test in a Korean-language dispatch.

The reliability and accuracy of the cold launch system from a tracked transporter erector launcher (TEL), the working and operation features of the high thrust solid fuel-powered engines, as well as the guidance and stabilization systems of the missile “during its active flight”, among other things, have been “completely verified,” a report said.

The accuracy of the attitude control system on the missile can be tracked by image data transmitted from the camera installed on the nuclear warhead, KCNA added.

“The whole world looks beautiful and feels happy when I see the earth filmed by a rocket launched by us,” Kim Jong Un reportedly said after looking at photos of the earth transmitted by the rocket’s camera “in real time.”

KCNA said Kim also emphasized that the North should push ahead with the “diversification and advancement” of its nuclear forces, with the aim of making North Korea’s enemies “become crazy and never awake to their full mind.”

One expert said North Korea’s insistence that the missile could now be “mass-produced” was significant, but added that the claim could not yet be verified.

“To put things into proper perspective – Yes, the Pukguksong-2 is reliable (by DPRK standards),” said Tal Inbar, head of the Space & UAV center at the Fisher Institute for Air and Space Strategic Studies. “Yes, they could start mass production, but no, we cannot verify that at the moment.”

In August, the North claimed a test of a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) had been a success, describing it as having been carried out without “adverse impact” on neighboring countries.

Land-based testing of the Pukguksong-1 SLBM began as early as 2013, when a test-stand at Sinpo was built, and the first confirmed submerged test launch was conducted in May 2015.

The Pukguksong-1 SLBM is believed to be based on the visually-similar Soviet-designed R-27 Zyb (NATO reporting name SS-N-6) SLBM.

Another expert said the rapid testing and deployment of the Pukguksong-2 was concerning.

“It is a solid propellant missile that could be harder to detect before launch,” Anthony Ruggiero, a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, said.

“The Trump administration should sanction North Korea and its supporters, especially China, before Pyongyang completes the development of its road-mobile intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). Last week’s test was a step forward in the ICBM program and Washington should act before it is too late.”

Kim Dong-yub, a Professor at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies, Kyungnam University, said the missile would likely “not have been much improved.”

“I think the missile was relaunched after correcting and making up for defects which were found in test-firing conducted in February,” Kim told NK News.

Kim said both missiles fired in February and May reached an altitude of around 560km and traveled 500km, and that the Pukguksong-2 may be capable of flying between 2000 and 2500 km.

“The range of Pukguksong-2 missile is behind that of the Musudan missile, which can target Guam and has an estimated range of between 3000-4000 km,” Kim said. “But given that the Pukguksong-2 missile didn’t use 100% of its thrust, the missile should be classified as a solid-fueled Musudan ballistic missile.”

Kim also suggested the possibility that this launch could “lead to the development of the solid propellant ICBM,” arguing that the first stage of KN-14, the liquid-fuel ICBM, is made of a cluster of two Musudan engines.

“It’s likely to create the first-stage propulsion of ICBM by clustering two to four engines of Pukguksong-2 missile.”

Meanwhile, South Korea’s JCS argued on Monday that “additional verification” is needed to confirm the warhead’s stable re-entry into the atmosphere.

“But South Korean and U.S. information authorities estimate that the North obtained meaningful date to improve the reliability of missile technology through the missile launch conducted yesterday,” JCS spokesperson Roh Jae-cheon told media during a regular news briefing.

Edited by Oliver Hotham

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed May 24, 2017 9:51 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Explosion at Manchester England concert

May 24, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Possibility of another attack?? :bored:

Manchester attack: UK terror threat level raised to ‘critical,’ another attack may be imminent
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/05/23 … inent.html

British Prime Minister Theresa May announced Tuesday that the country’s terror threat level has been raised to its highest level based on evidence gathered during the investigation of the deadly attack at a Manchester Ariana Grande concert, signifying that another attack may be imminent.

“The threat level should be increased, for the time being, from severe to critical,” May said, adding the assessment is “a further attack may be imminent.”

Raising the country’s threat level means that armed military personnel will replace police officers at some public events, such as sports matches, according to May.

Based on intelligence provided by the British, a U.S. government official told Fox News the evidence points to a suspect who was “coached or trained on line or in person” to carry out the attack.

The official described the bomb placement to Fox News as “perfect” to maximize casualties, which required planning.

Earlier on Tuesday, British authorities identified the suicide bomber who launched a deadly attack at the concert, hours after the Islamic State terror group claimed responsibility for the blast.

Salman Abedi, 22, was identified as the man who detonated an improvised explosive device at about 10:30 p.m. local time Monday, killing more than 20 people, some of them children, and injuring dozens more, Manchester police confirmed in a news conference on Tuesday. At least 12 children under the age of 16 were injured, emergency responders said. An 8-year-old girl was among the dead.

May said Abadi was born and raised in Britain.

It was previously reported that Abedi was 23, but police clarified that another 23-year-old man was arrested. Two warrants have been issued at two separate residences. Officers used a police-controlled explosive device to gain entry into one home.

ISIS claimed on Tuesday that “a soldier of the caliphate planted bombs in the middle of Crusaders gatherings” then detonated them, but Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats said that the U.S. had not yet verified that the terror group was responsible.

The explosion unfolded outside Manchester Arena as Grande’s concert was coming to a close. The pop star, who wasn’t injured, reportedly suspended her Dangerous Woman Tour following the attack. She wrote on Twitter, “broken. from the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don’t have words.”

Officials believe the device was packed with shrapnel, built to inflict as much human damage as possible, according to U.S. law enforcement sources. Manchester police said one of their priorities is to investigate whether the attacker acted alone or had some kind of support.

Around the United Kingdom and across Europe, the attack brought fear and mourning. At Buckingham Palace, Queen Elizabeth II marked a moment of silence along her husband Prince Philip as well as Prince Charles and his wife Camilla. In Rome, the lights of the Colosseum and Trevi Fountain were darkened.

While on a visit to the West Bank city of Bethlehem, President Donald Trump called the perpetrators “evil losers” and said “this wicked ideology must be obliterated.”

Manchester, located 160 miles northwest of London, is one of Britain’s largest cities. The attack was the deadliest in Britain since four suicide bombers killed 52 London commuters on subway trains and a bus in 2005.

The claim of responsibility by ISIS echoed others the group has made for attacks in the West but with vague details that left open the possibility it was an opportunistic attempt at propaganda.

Manchester itself has seen terror before, but not this deadly. The city was hit by a huge Irish Republican Army bomb in 1996 that leveled a swath of the city center. More than 200 people were injured, although no one was killed.

The bombing also elicited painful memories of the 2015 terror attacks in Paris, where most of the 130 killed were at the Bataclan concert hall.

Fox News’ Catherine Herridge, Jake Gibson and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

“It is a possibility we cannot ignore, that there is a wider group of individuals linked to this attack,” she added.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 23, 2017 9:30 pm