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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 27, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Seychelles – Suspected Plague (Ex- Madagascar)http://www.who.int/csr/don/26-october-2 … helles/en/Disease outbreak news26 October 2017Madagascar is experiencing a large outbreak of plague affecting major cities and other non-endemic areas since Augu…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 27, 2017 ReadyMom 0

casualprepper wrote:I feel like with all the possibilities of disasters or SHTF/WROL situations a massive disease outbreak will be the hardest to survive as it is the least predictable. Any tips?You need to beef up your medical supplies. Think overwhe…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 27, 2017 ReadyMom 0

casualprepper wrote:I feel like with all the possibilities of disasters or SHTF/WROL situations a massive disease outbreak will be the hardest to survive as it is the least predictable. Any tips?You need to beef up your medical supplies. Think overwhe…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 daaswampman 0

casualprepper wrote:I feel like with all the possibilities of disasters or SHTF/WROL situations a massive disease outbreak will be the hardest to survive as it is the least predictable. Any tips?Depends on where you live and the preparations you have …

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 casualprepper 0

I feel like with all the possibilities of disasters or SHTF/WROL situations a massive disease outbreak will be the hardest to survive as it is the least predictable. Any tips?Statistics: Posted by casualprepper — Thu Oct 26, 2017 2:50 pm

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 sageprice 0

PatrioticStabilist wrote:Hate to say it but something needs to reduce the world population drastically. We are laying waste,polluting, and destroying it, needs time to clean itself and renew.Don’t worry, only one percent of the population are prepper…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

kenjabroni wrote:Illini Warrior wrote:keep an eye on the international airports in the UK and France – that’s the usually connecting points coming out of Africa …….Yeah I was thinking the big airports would be in that region of Europe. I just ho…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 kenjabroni 0

Illini Warrior wrote:keep an eye on the international airports in the UK and France – that’s the usually connecting points coming out of Africa …….Yeah I was thinking the big airports would be in that region of Europe. I just hope they didnt let…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

kenjabroni wrote:https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4765804/black-death-warning-in-nine-countries-including-brit-holiday-hotspots-amid-fears-plague-could-spread-on-flights-from-madagascar/Ive read some dystopian type novels about this fairly recently so it…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

kenjabroni wrote:https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4765804/black-death-warning-in-nine-countries-including-brit-holiday-hotspots-amid-fears-plague-could-spread-on-flights-from-madagascar/Ive read some dystopian type novels about this fairly recently so it…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

I can tell you with some certainty – if this plague gets totally out of control similar to the earlier ebola outbreak in Africa – Prez Trump won’t have any trouble with a border closure – unlike Obammy who refused to even consider it ….Statistics: P…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

October 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

I can tell you with some certainty – if this plague gets totally out of control similar to the earlier ebola outbreak in Africa – Prez Trump won’t have any trouble with a border closure – unlike Obammy who refused to even consider it ….Statistics: P…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Pneumonic Plague

October 25, 2017 kenjabroni 0

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4765804/black-death-warning-in-nine-countries-including-brit-holiday-hotspots-amid-fears-plague-could-spread-on-flights-from-madagascar/Ive read some dystopian type novels about this fairly recently so its kind of eye ope…

Pandemic Preparedness • Post-Ebola Syndrome

July 19, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

Scientists have been studying the survivors of the last mass Ebola outbreaks and have found that in some cases the virus hides in some immune cells and other spots in the body that the immune system doesn’t touch much.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/07 … une-cells/

“Post-Ebola syndrome” is something else to keep you up at night
Researchers are only beginning to understand this and may now have monkey model.

The hardest part of their research is that:

Most animal models of Ebola infections result in nearly 100-percent fatalities in short order—nixing the chance of developing persistent infections. But Zeng and his colleagues are hopeful that their data can lead researchers to a model of persistence using medically treated rhesus monkeys. The researchers say they’ve already begun work on developing such a model.

So even when someone has recovered, it doesn’t mean that they are not infectious anymore…

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:05 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Post-Ebola Syndrome

July 19, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

Scientists have been studying the survivors of the last mass Ebola outbreaks and have found that in some cases the virus hides in some immune cells and other spots in the body that the immune system doesn’t touch much.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/07 … une-cells/

“Post-Ebola syndrome” is something else to keep you up at night
Researchers are only beginning to understand this and may now have monkey model.

The hardest part of their research is that:

Most animal models of Ebola infections result in nearly 100-percent fatalities in short order—nixing the chance of developing persistent infections. But Zeng and his colleagues are hopeful that their data can lead researchers to a model of persistence using medically treated rhesus monkeys. The researchers say they’ve already begun work on developing such a model.

So even when someone has recovered, it doesn’t mean that they are not infectious anymore…

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:05 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Post-Ebola Syndrome

July 19, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

Scientists have been studying the survivors of the last mass Ebola outbreaks and have found that in some cases the virus hides in some immune cells and other spots in the body that the immune system doesn’t touch much.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/07 … une-cells/

“Post-Ebola syndrome” is something else to keep you up at night
Researchers are only beginning to understand this and may now have monkey model.

The hardest part of their research is that:

Most animal models of Ebola infections result in nearly 100-percent fatalities in short order—nixing the chance of developing persistent infections. But Zeng and his colleagues are hopeful that their data can lead researchers to a model of persistence using medically treated rhesus monkeys. The researchers say they’ve already begun work on developing such a model.

So even when someone has recovered, it doesn’t mean that they are not infectious anymore…

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:05 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: H7N9 Bird Flu in China is Pandemic Potential Flu

May 24, 2017 drmillerne 0

In addition to a naturally evolving new virus like H7N9, we have an even worse threat–bioengineered viruses. The technology and know how to do this is widespread. Not just a small terrorist group, but a dedicated individual can either bird flu and work to modify it to be human to human contagious. This youtube video with link below explains why this threat of bioengineered viral pandemics is especially bad. The video also explains how a pandemic (from a bioattack or accidentally spreading) will likely lead to a collapse in economic activity and widespread loss of law and order. A very professional, analytic, presentation. Also offers suggestions on how to prepare.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i03iKilhz8I&t=129s
This is worth watching and sharing! If you have trouble convincing people of the need to prep–show them this video!

Statistics: Posted by drmillerne — Wed May 24, 2017 4:47 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: EBOLA-News & Discussion-WORLD-(Continued Reports)

May 12, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

And from the BBC:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-39899406

Ebola: WHO declares outbreak in DR Congo

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
At least one person has died after contracting the virus in the country’s north-east, the WHO says.
The Congolese health ministry had notified the WHO of a “lab-confirmed case” of Ebola, it added on Twitter.

<snip>

Full article at http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-39899406

Time to recheck your medical preps and see if anything needs replacing….

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Fri May 12, 2017 9:55 am


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 2, 2017 ReadyMom 0
TuapekaGold wrote:
ReadyMom,
A real shocker that there is such a disparity between US prices and Mexican prices for the same product. What causes this? Also is the Mexican stuff reliable as to safety standards? I was just interested as I have no clue about it.

We also have family down there. Brother in Law & sister-in-law (married to hubby’s brother). SIL is a nurse in Texas. While we were visiting them & some of their friends, I asked that, because we were talking about my ‘shopping list’ for our Mexico visit. I asked about the reliability of the meds. There was another older man there, who worked at a hospital, years ago. They all said ‘yes’ the meds are the same as what we get here. Actually, SIL had a plastic bag with her, on the trip, that was full of little empty med boxes that she had rec’d from her American doctor with scripts. She wanted to replace those meds with the meds from Mexico.

Someone on a Facebook page I belong to said that some vanillas from Texas have an ingredient that is a known blood thinner added. I didn’t know that. I read the ingredients on my bought vanilla and it’s not there. We also got boxes of Orbit gum. At Sam’s Club, a club pack of 12 is nearly $8.77/pack … in Mexico a ‘club pack’ of 8 is only $2.35!!! Crazy! Same stuff. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 02, 2017 8:58 am


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
[

ReadyMom…. How does Vanilla help?….I haven’t heard of that….

LoL! Sorry for the confusion. It doesn’t. It was just one of my great purchases during the big medical stockpile. Those are just a few of the med bottles … a sample. I got 6 bottles of the ‘Deflenol’ … it’s Mucinex. $6.95/100 vs about $41-$59/100 (depending on where you shop).
16 oz. of pure vanilla at sams club is $18+/16 oz …. I got 33 oz for $1.95! Same with the honey … that 2# jar only cost $3.85! I bought 2 of each of those items. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 01, 2017 6:53 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
[

ReadyMom…. How does Vanilla help?….I haven’t heard of that….

LoL! Sorry for the confusion. It doesn’t. It was just one of my great purchases during the big medical stockpile. Those are just a few of the med bottles … a sample. I got 6 bottles of the ‘Deflenol’ … it’s Mucinex. $6.95/100 vs about $41-$59/100 (depending on where you shop).
16 oz. of pure vanilla at sams club is $18+/16 oz …. I got 33 oz for $1.95! Same with the honey … that 2# jar only cost $3.85! I bought 2 of each of those items. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 01, 2017 6:53 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
ReadyMom wrote:

dmwalsh568 wrote: I really need to check on fish to see if they have enough antibiotics just in case. :whistling:

We were visiting soccer-playing son, in Texas the past few days. While there, he’s so close to the border we went on another shopping trip to Mexico, so I stocked up again. (Did so last month, while there, too! :D ). My fish will be very healthy, should anything pop up 8) . I was also able to get pure vanilla & honey in 2 lb bottles for just a couple of dollars ($2-3!!) each! Both have indefinite shelf life.

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ReadyMom…. How does Vanilla help?….I haven’t heard of that….

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Mon May 01, 2017 5:35 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
ReadyMom wrote:

dmwalsh568 wrote: I really need to check on fish to see if they have enough antibiotics just in case. :whistling:

We were visiting soccer-playing son, in Texas the past few days. While there, he’s so close to the border we went on another shopping trip to Mexico, so I stocked up again. (Did so last month, while there, too! :D ). My fish will be very healthy, should anything pop up 8) . I was also able to get pure vanilla & honey in 2 lb bottles for just a couple of dollars ($2-3!!) each! Both have indefinite shelf life.

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ReadyMom…. How does Vanilla help?….I haven’t heard of that….

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Mon May 01, 2017 5:35 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
I really need to check on fish to see if they have enough antibiotics just in case. :whistling:

We were visiting soccer-playing son, in Texas the past few days. While there, he’s so close to the border we went on another shopping trip to Mexico, so I stocked up again. (Did so last month, while there, too! :D ). My fish will be very healthy, should anything pop up 8) . I was also able to get pure vanilla & honey in 2 lb bottles for just a couple of dollars ($2-3!!) each! Both have indefinite shelf life.

Image

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 01, 2017 4:34 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 ReadyMom 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
I really need to check on fish to see if they have enough antibiotics just in case. :whistling:

We were visiting soccer-playing son, in Texas the past few days. While there, he’s so close to the border we went on another shopping trip to Mexico, so I stocked up again. (Did so last month, while there, too! :D ). My fish will be very healthy, should anything pop up 8) . I was also able to get pure vanilla & honey in 2 lb bottles for just a couple of dollars ($2-3!!) each! Both have indefinite shelf life.

Image

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 01, 2017 4:34 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Mystery illness in Liberia

May 1, 2017 dmwalsh568 0

As if we don’t have enough to worry about, an article on CNN talks about an unknown disease that both the WHO and the CDC are looking into:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/01/health/li … index.html

11 dead so far with 21 hospitalized. Ebola and Lassa fever have been ruled out. Samples have been sent to Atlanta for the CDC to analyze.

Maybe nothing, but it’s a reminder to keep up to date with medical preps while the news keeps us focused on other threats. I really need to check on fish to see if they have enough antibiotics just in case. :whistling:

Statistics: Posted by dmwalsh568 — Mon May 01, 2017 2:14 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: H7N9 Bird Flu in China is Pandemic Potential Flu

April 11, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Why Chinese Scientists Are More Worried Than Ever About Bird Flu
http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsod … ium=social

At a research lab on top of a forested hill overlooking Hong Kong, scientists are growing viruses. They first drill tiny holes into an egg before inoculating it with avian influenza to observe how the virus behaves.

This lab at Hong Kong University is at the world’s forefront of our understanding of H7N9, a deadly strain of the bird flu that has killed more people this season — 162 from September up to March 1 — than in any single season since when it was first discovered in humans four years ago. That worries lab director Guan Yi. But what disturbs him more is how fast this strain is evolving. “We’re trying our best, but we still can’t control this virus,” says Guan. “It’s too late for us to eradicate it.”

Guan is one of the world’s leading virologists. He’s held some of the worst in his hands: H1N5, H1N1 and SARS. His work on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, in 2003 led to the successful identification of its infectious source from live animal markets and helped China’s government control the virus that had killed hundreds, avoiding a second outbreak.

He has now moved on to avian influenza.

Guan’s office, which has a view of the lush hills and blue waters of Hong Kong Harbor, is decorated with ceramic figurines of ducks, geese, and chickens. His adjacent lab is full of tissue samples of the birds — and of deceased humans — all of whom have perished from H7N9.

The fowl samples — along with live birds — arrive from a network of scientists who, each week, purchase birds at poultry markets throughout southern China. Back in December, Guan and his colleague Zhu Huachen began noticing something strange about them. “Some of the birds … they will die within a day,” says Zhu

The birds who were quick to die of H7N9 were all chickens. This was a surprise, because chickens normally live with the virus in what’s known as a low pathogenic state — they carry the virus but don’t die from it and have a low capacity to spread it. Guan and his team discovered the H7N9 strain had mutated into a new form that kills chickens even more quickly.

“Ten years ago, H7N9 was less lethal,” says Guan. “Now it’s become deadlier in chickens. Before it barely affected chickens. Now many are dying. Our research shows it can kill all the chickens in our lab within 24 hours. If this latest mutation isn’t stopped, more will die.”

Guan says this is very bad news for a global poultry industry that’s worth hundreds of billions of dollars, and he says China’s government is already looking into vaccinating chickens. What worries Guan more, though, is that H7N9 has proven an ability to mutate quickly. There’s no evidence that the virus has become more deadly in people. But already, in the rare cases when humans catch it from birds, more than a third of them die.

Currently, the virus hasn’t been known to spread easily among humans, but Guan fears a future mutation could. “Based on my 20 years of studying H7N9 — the virus itself as well as how the government handles it — I’m pessimistic,” says Guan, shaking his head. “I think this virus poses the greatest threat to humanity than any other in the past one hundred years.”

Guan’s choice of one hundred years is deliberate. Next year will mark the 100-year anniversary of what was known as the Spanish Flu, the most devastating epidemic in recorded history. As World War I drew to a close, the influenza of 1918 killed between 20 and 50 million people, all dead from a flu that originated in birds. He says it’s not a stretch to envision another global pandemic.

“Today, science is more advanced, we have vaccines and it’s easy to diagnose,” says Guan. “On the other hand, it now takes hours to spread new viruses all over the world.”

Keiji Fukuda, former global director of the World Health Organization’s Influenza Program, is also concerned. “We are now able to make vaccines and analyze things faster, but at the same time, the movement of people and animals is faster. There’s a balance in those things. Some are helpful, some aren’t. Everything’s moving more quickly, and it’s a shifting thing.”

Fukuda, who now teaches at Hong Kong University’s school of public health, says H7N9’s ability to mutate from low pathogenic to highly pathogenic — deadly and infectious — in chickens disturbs him.

“It makes us queasy,” Fukuda says. “Because it’s a very visible way to see these viruses as restless. Some of these changes are dead-end, but some are not. And this genetic mutation is not. It’s becoming more lethal for poultry. For people? We’re not sure.”

What’s worse, says Guan, is that new mutations of the bird flu virus are typically discovered in China, a country with scores of small poultry farms run by farmers who aren’t well-educated about the threat of bird flu and who often hide evidence of infected birds to protect their bottom line. “Farmers are scared of losing money. I know how they think — I’m from a rural part of China. And that’s why I’m not optimistic about this.”

Guan says there are a few encouraging signs.

Big cities like Shanghai have quickly shut down their live poultry markets when human cases are on the rise.

But that’s just China.

Guan says preventing the next global pandemic will depend on how well the governments of individual countries collaborate. That, he says, is a different challenge altogether.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Apr 11, 2017 9:17 am


No Picture

Pandemic Preparedness • Re: H7N9 Bird Flu in China is Pandemic Potential Flu

April 11, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Why Chinese Scientists Are More Worried Than Ever About Bird Flu
http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsod … ium=social

At a research lab on top of a forested hill overlooking Hong Kong, scientists are growing viruses. They first drill tiny holes into an egg before inoculating it with avian influenza to observe how the virus behaves.

This lab at Hong Kong University is at the world’s forefront of our understanding of H7N9, a deadly strain of the bird flu that has killed more people this season — 162 from September up to March 1 — than in any single season since when it was first discovered in humans four years ago. That worries lab director Guan Yi. But what disturbs him more is how fast this strain is evolving. “We’re trying our best, but we still can’t control this virus,” says Guan. “It’s too late for us to eradicate it.”

Guan is one of the world’s leading virologists. He’s held some of the worst in his hands: H1N5, H1N1 and SARS. His work on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, in 2003 led to the successful identification of its infectious source from live animal markets and helped China’s government control the virus that had killed hundreds, avoiding a second outbreak.

He has now moved on to avian influenza.

Guan’s office, which has a view of the lush hills and blue waters of Hong Kong Harbor, is decorated with ceramic figurines of ducks, geese, and chickens. His adjacent lab is full of tissue samples of the birds — and of deceased humans — all of whom have perished from H7N9.

The fowl samples — along with live birds — arrive from a network of scientists who, each week, purchase birds at poultry markets throughout southern China. Back in December, Guan and his colleague Zhu Huachen began noticing something strange about them. “Some of the birds … they will die within a day,” says Zhu

The birds who were quick to die of H7N9 were all chickens. This was a surprise, because chickens normally live with the virus in what’s known as a low pathogenic state — they carry the virus but don’t die from it and have a low capacity to spread it. Guan and his team discovered the H7N9 strain had mutated into a new form that kills chickens even more quickly.

“Ten years ago, H7N9 was less lethal,” says Guan. “Now it’s become deadlier in chickens. Before it barely affected chickens. Now many are dying. Our research shows it can kill all the chickens in our lab within 24 hours. If this latest mutation isn’t stopped, more will die.”

Guan says this is very bad news for a global poultry industry that’s worth hundreds of billions of dollars, and he says China’s government is already looking into vaccinating chickens. What worries Guan more, though, is that H7N9 has proven an ability to mutate quickly. There’s no evidence that the virus has become more deadly in people. But already, in the rare cases when humans catch it from birds, more than a third of them die.

Currently, the virus hasn’t been known to spread easily among humans, but Guan fears a future mutation could. “Based on my 20 years of studying H7N9 — the virus itself as well as how the government handles it — I’m pessimistic,” says Guan, shaking his head. “I think this virus poses the greatest threat to humanity than any other in the past one hundred years.”

Guan’s choice of one hundred years is deliberate. Next year will mark the 100-year anniversary of what was known as the Spanish Flu, the most devastating epidemic in recorded history. As World War I drew to a close, the influenza of 1918 killed between 20 and 50 million people, all dead from a flu that originated in birds. He says it’s not a stretch to envision another global pandemic.

“Today, science is more advanced, we have vaccines and it’s easy to diagnose,” says Guan. “On the other hand, it now takes hours to spread new viruses all over the world.”

Keiji Fukuda, former global director of the World Health Organization’s Influenza Program, is also concerned. “We are now able to make vaccines and analyze things faster, but at the same time, the movement of people and animals is faster. There’s a balance in those things. Some are helpful, some aren’t. Everything’s moving more quickly, and it’s a shifting thing.”

Fukuda, who now teaches at Hong Kong University’s school of public health, says H7N9’s ability to mutate from low pathogenic to highly pathogenic — deadly and infectious — in chickens disturbs him.

“It makes us queasy,” Fukuda says. “Because it’s a very visible way to see these viruses as restless. Some of these changes are dead-end, but some are not. And this genetic mutation is not. It’s becoming more lethal for poultry. For people? We’re not sure.”

What’s worse, says Guan, is that new mutations of the bird flu virus are typically discovered in China, a country with scores of small poultry farms run by farmers who aren’t well-educated about the threat of bird flu and who often hide evidence of infected birds to protect their bottom line. “Farmers are scared of losing money. I know how they think — I’m from a rural part of China. And that’s why I’m not optimistic about this.”

Guan says there are a few encouraging signs.

Big cities like Shanghai have quickly shut down their live poultry markets when human cases are on the rise.

But that’s just China.

Guan says preventing the next global pandemic will depend on how well the governments of individual countries collaborate. That, he says, is a different challenge altogether.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue Apr 11, 2017 9:17 am


:wave:

Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Has anyone seen this yet??

March 11, 2017 angie_nrs 0

Like ICE, I too keep a supply of CS on hand. I use it for minor issues when I’m not sure if I’m dealing with a virus or bacterial issue as it works on both.

As far as fungal infections….the fungus likes an acidic environment which is basically an “unhealthy” environment.
http://www.drgregemerson.com/fact-file/ … infections

I have urine test strips at home so I can keep track of Ph levels. The strips don’t give an exact number but a color so that you can get a rough idea of your Ph levels. Although, I keep the strips on hand for my dog who has struvite stones and gets frequent UTI’s. They’re nice to have on hand. You can learn a lot from your urine.

Apparently eating a healthy diet helps, but realistically has little effect on immediate Ph levels. Although here is an article that states lemon and pineapple water are helpful. I’m not sure it it’s true or not, but it wouldn’t hurt.

Here is an article regarding vinegar to help with Ph.
http://www.vinegar-home-remedies.com/ph-balance.html

Again, I don’t know how accurate it is, but I do have apple cider vinegar tablets at home. I take them mostly in the spring and summer to ward off bugs since they typically like to bite me and when I take the ACV, they tend to leave me alone.

If I had a fungal problem, I would keep close track of my Ph levels and try the above do-it-yourself remedies in addition to following doctors orders. It’s always good to know there are some things you can do yourself to help your situation.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Sat Mar 11, 2017 11:48 am


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Has anyone seen this yet??

March 11, 2017 daaswampman 0

[snip]

(NEWSER) – The CDC warned American hospitals last year to keep an eye out for the emergence of a possibly fatal, drug-resistant yeast infection, and now the agency’s fears may be realized. CDC officials tell the Washington Post that 35 patients in the US have been stricken with Candida auris, a fungus that can cause bloodstream, wound, and ear infections, with another 18 people harboring the microbe without becoming ill. Some strains of the pathogen don’t respond to the three main classes of antifungal drugs, and based on the small number of cases health officials have had the chance to review, 60% of patients hit with C. auris have died (though the agency notes many of those patients had other serious medical issues they were contending with). The fungus is contagious and durable, especially in health care facilities, where it can stick around on furniture and other equipment for months.

http://www.newser.com/story/239592/fear … d-cdc.html

The fungus is contagious and durable, especially in health care facilities, where it can stick around on furniture and other equipment for months.

This is what makes it so interesting! It can survive in the environment for months! Imagine what could happen in an average nursing home. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Fri Mar 10, 2017 9:00 pm


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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Has anyone seen this yet??

March 11, 2017 daaswampman 0

[snip]

(NEWSER) – The CDC warned American hospitals last year to keep an eye out for the emergence of a possibly fatal, drug-resistant yeast infection, and now the agency’s fears may be realized. CDC officials tell the Washington Post that 35 patients in the US have been stricken with Candida auris, a fungus that can cause bloodstream, wound, and ear infections, with another 18 people harboring the microbe without becoming ill. Some strains of the pathogen don’t respond to the three main classes of antifungal drugs, and based on the small number of cases health officials have had the chance to review, 60% of patients hit with C. auris have died (though the agency notes many of those patients had other serious medical issues they were contending with). The fungus is contagious and durable, especially in health care facilities, where it can stick around on furniture and other equipment for months.

http://www.newser.com/story/239592/fear … d-cdc.html

The fungus is contagious and durable, especially in health care facilities, where it can stick around on furniture and other equipment for months.

This is what makes it so interesting! It can survive in the environment for months! Imagine what could happen in an average nursing home. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Fri Mar 10, 2017 9:00 pm