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Northeast • Re: Ramps, aka Wild Leeks

February 9, 2017 KazKaz 0

My suggestion would be to research the “family tree” of the Genus and try close relatives alongside your personal choice.
A very small variation in species may work much better in the unique structure of medium you have put together to grow from.
Soil composition changes from one side of a tree to the other. (Compaction, moisture, sunlight, slope, etc.)
Even in a greenhouse or home garden environment, many variables exist.
By trying relatives, there is a good chance to achieve a better end result, without a significant deviation from what you seek to have, simply by trying very close variations of the intended plant.
Given the same challenge, here is where my research would begin.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_tricoccum
Once I have a ‘common’ name of relative variations, aquiring those specific seeds become the next challenge.

Statistics: Posted by KazKaz — Thu Feb 09, 2017 12:44 am


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Northeast • Re: Ramps, aka Wild Leeks

February 8, 2017 anita 0

I’m not sure if ramps are the same as ramsons, or wild garlic, but perhaps similar? I was able to get seed for ransoms from Bakers Creek. They were tough to germinate, although I did grow a few. Have them planted in a shady portion of my garden.

In looking through the Bakers Creek Seeds reviews on Ransoms, someone said they are the same as ramps, so I don’t know. Everyone seemed to agree they are tough to germinate from seed.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Wed Feb 08, 2017 1:55 pm


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Northeast • Re: Ramps, aka Wild Leeks

February 8, 2017 KazKaz 0

Although this is a VERY old post, I just noticed it.
Something worthy of addition here is that leeks very often share the exact same habitat as wild American Ginseng. Typically old growth hardwood canopy, moist soil, and a tendency to be on North facing slopes.
If you happen to be foraging in the fall (only legal time for collection) kill 2 birds with one stone and look for both species.
Wild ginseng can be sold to herb dealers for amounts ranging from $200-1000 per pound depending on moisture content and quality (age).
An excellent way to make some easy money relaxing on the road less travelled.
There’s gold in them thar hills!

Statistics: Posted by KazKaz — Wed Feb 08, 2017 12:35 pm