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Natural Disasters • CA: Oroville dam collapse feared

February 13, 2017 BK in KC 0

BREAKING: Marysville, Yuba County evacuated as Oroville spillway collapse feared

Marysville, Yuba County ordered to evacuate

5:42 p.m.

Marysville police say the city and Yuba County are under mandatory evacuation orders because of the feared collapse of the emergency spillway at Lake Oroville Dam. Yolo County officials said in a tweet that they do not expect any impact.

Witnesses reported a heavy police presence in the city.

“The hazardous situation concerning the Oroville Dam auxiliary spillway is NOT expected to impact Yolo County,” the county said.

Cal OES spokesman Brad Alexander said officials were activating the state emergency operations center and could not immediately address how waterlogged Sacramento County might be affected.

“I can’t answer that right now,” Alexander said.

“It’s uncontrolled. It’s uncontrolled

Statistics: Posted by BK in KC — Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:20 pm


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Natural Disasters • Re: Flooding: Mitigation + safety tips

February 11, 2017 theoutback 0

Very good thread Itsa!

I’ll add a little here. When hurricane Irene came through here in Vermont it devastated the state. On the face of it, it didn’t sound bad for a hurricane, only a cat 1. As it made landfall in NJ it had dropped to a tropical storm and we might of had sustained winds of 40-50 mph up here. It rained much harder than we are used to, but again, for a Hurricane/ tropical storm it wasn’t bad, maybe 7 inches. However that was enough to overflood every river, brook and stream, wiping out mountainsides and roads with massive mudslides. People and towns in the mountains were cut off for weeks with no power and resources. Several homes and barns were washed away, along with a few lost lives.

So, the take home message is to take note and be prepared for possible devastating loss in mountainous areas. Extra water, food and coms could prove invaluable.

On a positive note, our roads and bridges have been rebuilt and in better shape than ever!

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sat Feb 11, 2017 7:44 am


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Natural Disasters • Re: 12 hour notice sun flare. what would you do?

February 10, 2017 Murby 0

There’s a lot of bad information circling the internet about EMP’s.. most of it is wrong.

EMP’s come in three flavors.. E1, E2 and E3

The E1 pulse is produced by nuclear weapons detonated in space. The pulse is short, measured in nanoseconds, but has a theoretical peak amplitude of around 50,000 volts per meter. Due to the inverse square law of wave propagation, the further out from the center of detonation you are, the smaller the amplitude. Plugged in or not, no unprotected electronics would survive within the highest amplitude radius of the center. Electronics in trash cans would not survive either but if they were packed in multiple EMP shielding layers, they’d have a chance. In the outlying areas around 1000 miles away, electronics stored in DIY EMP cans might have a chance of surviving.. It is still unlikely that your CoreI5 processor would survive but your 1990’s cb radio probably would, a dvd burner probably would, and most other electronics capable of surviving a small over-voltage too.

Want to protect that CoreI5 processor? It should be packed in multiple layers of electromagnetic shielding.. the more layers the better.

An E2 pulse is lightening. Enough said?

An E3 pulse is what we get from a CME (Coronal Mass Ejection). A CME will induce about 1 volt per meter into any conductive surface and will last for time frames measured in minutes or hours. Electronics on the ground that are not plugged into the grid will be safe.. your car will be safe, but the grid will get energized to millions of volts as that 1 volt per meter adds up fast on powerlines that stretch long distances. The grid will be toast, and it will stay that way for up to a decade in some places. An E3 pulse will ignite fires and burn homes down because it lasts so long that its capable of heating the conductors and melting insulation. The Carrington event saw charred and burned areas around the telephone poles due to this effect. Your microwave, television, battery chargers, radio’s, even your furnace controls could also ignite and burn your home down. Fire extinguishers are key here and most folks don’t have them.

Putting your valuables in a microwave is a waste of time for either EMP pulse.

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Fri Feb 10, 2017 12:49 pm


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Natural Disasters • Re: IN A DISASTER PRONE ZONE? WHAT KEEPS YOU IN YOURS?

February 3, 2017 Major French 0

While no place is totally free of tornado risk save Antarctica, but there at least 5 tornado alleys in the America, and not just the notorious ‘Dixie Alley’, too. Mass relocation of tens of millions of people is not feasible. A better solution is to require communities to allow above ground tornado proof igloos in people’s back yards, too. Additionally, trailer parks should not be exempt from this requirement, too.

Statistics: Posted by Major French — Thu Feb 02, 2017 8:05 pm


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Natural Disasters • Re: 12 hour notice sun flare. what would you do?

January 31, 2017 Cast Iron 0
3ADScout wrote:

Major French wrote:Would the following tactic to protect electronics? A. Unplug electronics B. put them in ziploc or plastic bags to protect from moisture, C. Put in a cellar, basement, storm bunker, safe room, or fallout shelter until the danger is announced over radio to have officially passed. Cheap analog transistor AM/FM radios could prove invaluable in this scenario, too. Why risk a $500.00 TV or a $300.00 computer when you could use a yard sale transistor radio instead?

Major French- if a Carrington level event was forecasted the last thing I would be worried about is my TV. I don’t think any of the TV broadcasters would survive. Life after a major solar flare would not allow for free time to watch TV even if you Blue ray and TV survived.

I would think time spent on Food and water would be time better spent than protecting consumer electronics. But that is just me. (I don’t watch much TV as it is)

Who needs TV?
There is nothing on worth watching.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:30 pm


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Natural Disasters • Re: 12 hour notice sun flare. what would you do?

January 30, 2017 3ADScout 0
Major French wrote:
Would the following tactic to protect electronics? A. Unplug electronics B. put them in ziploc or plastic bags to protect from moisture, C. Put in a cellar, basement, storm bunker, safe room, or fallout shelter until the danger is announced over radio to have officially passed. Cheap analog transistor AM/FM radios could prove invaluable in this scenario, too. Why risk a $500.00 TV or a $300.00 computer when you could use a yard sale transistor radio instead?

Major French- if a Carrington level event was forecasted the last thing I would be worried about is my TV. I don’t think any of the TV broadcasters would survive. Life after a major solar flare would not allow for free time to watch TV even if you Blue ray and TV survived.

I would think time spent on Food and water would be time better spent than protecting consumer electronics. But that is just me. (I don’t watch much TV as it is)

Statistics: Posted by 3ADScout — Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:48 pm


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Natural Disasters • Re: 12 hour notice sun flare. what would you do?

January 29, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
Major French wrote:
Would the following tactic to protect electronics? A. Unplug electronics B. put them in ziploc or plastic bags to protect from moisture, C. Put in a cellar, basement, storm bunker, safe room, or fallout shelter until the danger is announced over radio to have officially passed. Cheap analog transistor AM/FM radios could prove invaluable in this scenario, too. Why risk a $500.00 TV or a $300.00 computer when you could use a yard sale transistor radio instead?

thinking that electronics would be shielded in a cellar? …. NORAD has moved their entire operation back into Cheyenne Mountain facility – upgraded all the EMP shielding to survive the new 21st Century enhanced EMP nuke weapons that’ll be used …. buried under a rock mountain won’t get the job done by itself ….

put your transistor radio into the zip lock – maybe pad it for shock – put everything in a candy/cookie tin and it might survive ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Sun Jan 29, 2017 10:39 am


Natural Disasters • Re: 12 hour notice sun flare. what would you do?

January 29, 2017 Major French 0

Would the following tactic to protect electronics? A. Unplug electronics B. put them in ziploc or plastic bags to protect from moisture, C. Put in a cellar, basement, storm bunker, safe room, or fallout shelter until the danger is announced over radio to have officially passed. Cheap analog transistor AM/FM radios could prove invaluable in this scenario, too. Why risk a $500.00 TV or a $300.00 computer when you could use a yard sale transistor radio instead?

Statistics: Posted by Major French — Sun Jan 29, 2017 2:57 am