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Medical Experts • Re: Anti-Biotics

February 23, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

the thing about antibiotics, other drugs, first aid supplies and other medical gear you can acquire – this will be the hard part of the equation of medical care – finding knowable med people could be the eazy part …. the hospitals and clinics closing down doesn’t mean the staff went down with them …. going to be empty handed professionals of all flavors floating about – getting stitched up by a wayward neurosurgeon in exchange for a decent meal beats an infection any day ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Thu Feb 23, 2017 1:36 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: Anti-Biotics

February 23, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
Blondie wrote:
Be careful with the Cipro. Really, really nasty chit. Many dr’s are now rethinking this medication.

lol…WhatchU talkin’ about Blondie?

This list of side-effects for Cipro seems negligible, right? :p

•diarrhea
•dizziness
•drowsiness
•headache
•stomach upset
•abdominal pain
•nausea/vomiting
•blurred vision
•nervousness
•anxiety
•agitation
•sleep problems (insomnia or nightmares), and
•rash

Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Cipro including severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats; sudden pain, snapping or popping sound, bruising, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or loss of movement in any of your joints; watery or bloody diarrhea; confusion, hallucinations, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior; seizure (convulsions); severe headache, ringing in your ears, pain behind your eyes; pale or yellow skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness; urinating less than usual or not at all; easy bruising or bleeding; numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body; the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; or severe skin reaction — :eek::eek::eek::eek: fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling. :eek::eek::eek::eek:

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Thu Feb 23, 2017 11:02 am


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Medical Experts • Re: Anti-Biotics

February 14, 2017 jean11 0

I have been stocking and storing these antibiotics for 5 years. They are indeed the same antibiotics you’d buy from a pharmacy. I’ve used them a number of times for myself, hubby and our dog Scotty. Scotty at times comes down with Kennel Cough, and other times a bacterial skin infection. Our Vet put him on Keflex 250mg (a childs dose), 2 pills a day for 10 days. The pills did the job, plus now I don’t pay for a visit to the vet, or his expensive antibiotics. However, should we become sick with something I’m not familiar with I’d see our Doctor.

Statistics: Posted by jean11 — Mon Feb 13, 2017 11:02 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: Anti-Biotics

February 12, 2017 rickdun 0
Blondie wrote:
Be careful with the Cipro. Really, really nasty chit. Many dr’s are now rethinking this medication.

Ya, I know, I asked my doctor at the VA about it and she doesn’t recommend it unless it’s a last resort. So, I’ll keep it instead of throwing it out.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Sun Feb 12, 2017 3:05 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: Anti-Biotics

February 12, 2017 rickdun 0

Yes, fish anti-biotics can be used in an emergency situation, when medical help cannot be found. But, you need to read up on the doseages and what they are used for. I have purchased fish anti-biotics, amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, clindamycin, metronidazole, sulfa drugs and others.

A good book to invest in is the survival medicine handbook, it’s advertised on this website, very good book. Also you can ask questions to doctor bones and nurse amy (doom and bloom medical). Check the board index. Good luck.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Sun Feb 12, 2017 2:26 pm


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Medical Experts • Anti-Biotics

February 12, 2017 jeffsilver777 0

I was hoping that some of you might be able to share your thoughts on anti-biotics that you can buy from amazon like ‘Amoxfin’, which technically is for treating bacterial infections in fish. Some say that it is basically the same thing as the pills you would get at the pharmacy.

In a disaster situation, when there are no pharmacies to go to…could these be used with some positive effect in treating bacterial infections [in humans]?

Thanks,

Jeff

Statistics: Posted by jeffsilver777 — Sun Feb 12, 2017 2:08 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

February 5, 2017 Matte 0
sageprice wrote:

Pedro wyoming wrote:

Major French wrote:For emergency surgery, you could use starting fluid to put somebody order. It has ether. You could use it for things like dental extraction.

No. starting fluid is MOSTLY ether but also has light aromatic hydrocarbons (VOCs) that are very hazardous to ones health. They target the liver and central nervous system primarily but also cause other problems.
However…
It can be easily manufactured using a variety of methods. The simplest is alcohol condensation. I checked as i was writing this and there are youtube videos on this very subject. The one i watched is simple, safe and straightforward…boil ethyl alcohol and pass the vapour through a hot sulphuric acid bath and then through a reflux condenser. Google reflux condenser, vigreux (sp?) column or packed column. this is the only specialised piece of equipment that is needed. One can easily make this as well once the design is understood.

The only caveat is that ALL heat sources MUST be oil bath electrical. Any spark or flame or even electric coil glowing any shade of red will likely result in disasterous conflagration.

pW

TRY this instead https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z2oE8-uthU Make your own

Or go the easy route. Assayed 99.+% pure, and much safer for storage this way too.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:48 am


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

January 31, 2017 Major French 0

Thank you for recipe, sageprice!. According to special forces preppers, stating fluid is safe unless contraindicated by throat, brain, and stomach trauma OR respiratory and cardiac conditions preexisting in the patient, too.

Statistics: Posted by Major French — Tue Jan 31, 2017 3:06 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

January 31, 2017 sageprice 0
Pedro wyoming wrote:

Major French wrote:For emergency surgery, you could use starting fluid to put somebody order. It has ether. You could use it for things like dental extraction.

No. starting fluid is MOSTLY ether but also has light aromatic hydrocarbons (VOCs) that are very hazardous to ones health. They target the liver and central nervous system primarily but also cause other problems.
However…
It can be easily manufactured using a variety of methods. The simplest is alcohol condensation. I checked as i was writing this and there are youtube videos on this very subject. The one i watched is simple, safe and straightforward…boil ethyl alcohol and pass the vapour through a hot sulphuric acid bath and then through a reflux condenser. Google reflux condenser, vigreux (sp?) column or packed column. this is the only specialised piece of equipment that is needed. One can easily make this as well once the design is understood.

The only caveat is that ALL heat sources MUST be oil bath electrical. Any spark or flame or even electric coil glowing any shade of red will likely result in disasterous conflagration.

pW

TRY this instead https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z2oE8-uthU Make your own

Statistics: Posted by sageprice — Tue Jan 31, 2017 2:23 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

January 31, 2017 Pedro wyoming 0
Major French wrote:
For emergency surgery, you could use starting fluid to put somebody order. It has ether. You could use it for things like dental extraction.

No. starting fluid is MOSTLY ether but also has light aromatic hydrocarbons (VOCs) that are very hazardous to ones health. They target the liver and central nervous system primarily but also cause other problems.
However…
It can be easily manufactured using a variety of methods. The simplest is alcohol condensation. I checked as i was writing this and there are youtube videos on this very subject. The one i watched is simple, safe and straightforward…boil ethyl alcohol and pass the vapour through a hot sulphuric acid bath and then through a reflux condenser. Google reflux condenser, vigreux (sp?) column or packed column. this is the only specialised piece of equipment that is needed. One can easily make this as well once the design is understood.

The only caveat is that ALL heat sources MUST be oil bath electrical. Any spark or flame or even electric coil glowing any shade of red will likely result in disasterous conflagration.

pW

Statistics: Posted by Pedro wyoming — Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:07 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

January 30, 2017 rj5156 0
sageprice wrote:
http://www.planetherbs.com/michaels-blog/corydalis-yanhusuo-for-inflammatory-and-neuropathic-pain.html I’m still trying it

Thank you for this Sageprice! I enjoyed the article and looked at the Willow Aid. Corydalis has just moved way up my list of things we need growing in the yard. Hope it works for you and gives you complete relief. Love to hear what you think either way.

I might try a blend with willow, and one of the muscle relaxers such as rosemary, lobelia or valarian. Shotgun approach. De-sensitize the nerves, treat for inflammation and also for the muscle pain that so often comes when pain of any sort is present. We tend to carry tension where we hurt.

Interesting they’ve finally isolated a plant chemical they can work to make synthetic copies of. Wonder how long it will take that to hit the market.

I am always amazed when I see commercials advertising drugs, listing side-effects (generally not present when taking whole herbs) and how short a time it is until the commercials for lawsuits to sue for some problem caused by that drug begins to run…

I found seeds for many of the corydalis species, though not this one, here:

http://www.plant-world-seeds.com/store/ … wAodmj8Dpg

Little research should show which related plants might grow in our zone and offer the same properties. Going to copy this one to my thread so I don’t lose it.

Thanks again, new herb information is like getting big presents in my world!

Statistics: Posted by rj5156 — Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:28 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

January 30, 2017 rj5156 0

I don’t like pain but I am far more concerned about antibiotic resistant disease and viruses that modern medicine has yet to find many answers for. Stephen Buhner has researched and published two of the most informative, comprehensive – and USEFUL works I have seen in a lifetime’s obsession with plant medicine. We bought both of the following books, and are incorporating the information into our medicine plants with FANTASTIC results.

Lot of folks dying of infectious disease in the world today and the spike in antibiotic resistant disease means a lot more are dying all the time.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/16121216 … 8BPH09Z0C0

https://www.amazon.com/Herbal-Antibioti … 1603429875

Sorry. That is a LOT of information. Did I mention it has been a lifelong obsession?

Statistics: Posted by rj5156 — Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:56 pm


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

January 30, 2017 rj5156 0

Lot of plants are fine painkillers and anti-inflammatories. Most drugs are still made from plants. There are generally multiple plants for any given human ailment. Many grow well in most climates. We like using what we can grow. Doing that now means we’ll be in the habit. We are just starting to have a good crop to harvest and store. Much comfort in a well-stocked medicine cabinet we grew ourselves.

Here’s some basic info:
http://www.everydayhealth.com/pain-mana … edies.aspx

Always check for side-effects and interactions.

Mints and chamomile are pain-relievers and taste good. Cloves are anesthetic, they numb when used on skin. We make a tea and drink it for gut cramping, they are strongly antiseptic too. Easy to buy and store a lifetime supply.

Worth getting reference books. Plants for a future is an incredible resource. We bought the library on cd but it is free online:

http://pfaf.org/user/Default.aspx

Mrs. Grieve’s Modern Herbal is a stunning collection of traditional plant medicines with lots of helpful info. We bought the printed books but again, it is available free online:

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/mgmh.html

Germany’s Commission E tests herbs as medicine. The PDR for Herbal Medicine is a definitive work. Various editions are available, a copy can be had pretty cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/PDR-Herbal-Medic … 1563636786

These three works represent the cornerstones of our medicinal herb reference collection. We are starting to find works on herbal veterinary medicine and shopping those.

Statistics: Posted by rj5156 — Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:31 pm