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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 6, 2017 IceFire 0
Cast Iron wrote:

IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.

It’s great that he’s already trying to do what you bought him for. One other thing…if you plan on milking the does after the kids are born, then DEFINITELY keep the buck well downwind…the “billy goat funk” can actually taint the milk. That’s why goat milk frequently tastes funky. If you watch what the girls eat (I give mine alfalfa and a grain mix of wheat, oats, milo, and sunflower seed) they are a breed with a high butterfat content (LaManchas and Nubians have a good butterfat content) and keep the buck far, FAR away from the girls, the milk should just taste like really rich cows milk. “Funky” taste is a good indication that the buck is in too close proximity. Unless, of course, you LIKE the taste of billy goat funk…. :p

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Apr 05, 2017 9:02 pm


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 6, 2017 IceFire 0
Cast Iron wrote:

IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.

It’s great that he’s already trying to do what you bought him for. One other thing…if you plan on milking the does after the kids are born, then DEFINITELY keep the buck well downwind…the “billy goat funk” can actually taint the milk. That’s why goat milk frequently tastes funky. If you watch what the girls eat (I give mine alfalfa and a grain mix of wheat, oats, milo, and sunflower seed) they are a breed with a high butterfat content (LaManchas and Nubians have a good butterfat content) and keep the buck far, FAR away from the girls, the milk should just taste like really rich cows milk. “Funky” taste is a good indication that the buck is in too close proximity. Unless, of course, you LIKE the taste of billy goat funk…. :p

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Apr 05, 2017 9:02 pm


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:06 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:06 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

From the Andean mountains

Since cuys are small, recipes call for one per person, unless the meat is cut into smaller portions. Most often, the cuy is split apart and cooked whole, with the head still attached.

A typical recipe for baked or barbequed cuy with a hot sauce:
3 or 4 cuys
50 grams of ground toasted corn, or cornmeal
2 kilos of parboiled potatoes, cut in slices
8 cloves of garlic
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
½ cup oil
½ cup water
salt, pepper and cumin to taste
Rub the cuys with a mix of the pepper, salt, pepper and cumin and bake. You can also skewer over a barbeque.
Prepare a sauce with the oil, peppers, garlic and cornmeal with the water from the potatoes or broth. Cook a few minutes until the peppers are cooked. When tender, place the meat in a serving dish and spoon the sauce over it. Serve with the boiled potatoes.
Another recipe calls for:
4 cuys
1 teaspoon hot pepper
1 tablespoon pisco (hot sauce)
garlic to taste
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
1/4 cup oil
salt, pepper to taste Season the cleaned cuys with salt, pepper, hot pepper and pisco. Fry in oil five minutes or until cooked.
Serve with a hot pepper sauce, potatoes, either fried or boiled and a salad of cucumber, tomato, lettuce and onion.

roasted cuy
2 lrg animals
marinade
2 x red onions, minced
4 x cloves of garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp of salt
2 Tbsp. water
2 Tbsp. oil
pinch  annatto (for coloring)
to rub on before roasting: 2 Tbsp. lard
dipping sauce:
more  annatto coloring
2 x white onions, minced
2 x cloves garlic
salt
healthy pinch of cumin
1 lrg cup. of roasted and grnd coffee
peanuts
3 1/2 c. lowfat milk
Directions
Mix ingredients well and spread over the inside and outside of the animal. Allow to marinate for up to one day to allow flavors to meld. Before roasting, remove excess marinade to avoid scalding. The spit should be inserted into the back part of the animal and exit from the jaw. Once on the stick, tie the front and back feet, stretching out the legs. Put on grill, turning manually. Continue to apply lard to the skin to avoid drying out the meat. The cuy is ready when the skin is close to bursting. Serve with boiled potatoes sprinkled with coriander, chilies, and the peanut sauce. If your community is especially progressive, rice may be substituted for the potatoes.
Peanut Dipping Sauce: Fry onions till golden, then add in other ingredients. Cook at low heat for at least half an hour.

fibbing cuy (so called because the Peruvian cook couldn’t find cuy in the US so he used rabbit and cooked by the cuy recipe (he didn’t know where to look)
Ingredients
1 rabbit, 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 lb (1.5 to 2 kg), cut into serving pieces
 
Marinade
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
 
Braise
2 tbsp olive oil
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon Amarillo Chile Paste
1 tablespoon Panca Chile Paste
7 tablespoons (100 ml) white wine
1 cup (250 ml) good-quality chicken stock
1/3 cup (50 g) roasted peanuts, ground
12 new potatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Directions
1.
Put the rabbit pieces in a bowl. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a bowl and use your hands to massage the marinade into the rabbit pieces, making sure they are well covered. Season with salt and pepper and leave to marinate for at least a couple hours.
2.
Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Fry the rabbit pieces on all sides until evenly browned. Remove the rabbit from the pan with a slotted spoon and add the onion. Sauté the onion until translucent and then add the chile pastes. Cook for a further couple minutes and then deglaze the pan with the white wine. Scrape vigorously to make sure nothing is sticking and then add the stock. Return the pieces of rabbit to the pan. Cover and simmer over low heat for about 1 hour.
3.
Meanwhile, boil the potatoes in plenty of water until they are firm but tender inside. Drain, and when cool enough to handle, cut the potatoes in half crosswise.
4.
Stir in the peanuts and leave to simmer uncovered for a further 30 minutes, until the sauce has thickened and the rabbit is very tender. Add the potatoes and leave them to heat through. Serve sprinkled with the parsley.

Methods of Making Cuy Recipes
• Frying – This is quite acceptable method for making cuy dishes. This cooking method is also known as Frito or choctado.
• Broiling – This is the best method adopted for making cuy recipes. Broiling makes the meat tender as well as retains the juices.
• Roasting – Al horno or roasting is the traditional cooking method for cuy.
• Baking – This is the most contemporary method of making this meat and highly adopted in urban restaurants.
• Barbequing – Huatia is the term given to this cooking process and it is highly recommended for cuy cooking. Barbeque cuy recipes are popularly served corn beer.

Cuisines Commonly Making Cuy Recipes
Andean highland is the main region where cuy is fondly eaten as one of the varieties of meat. Peruvian and Bolivian cuisines are highly famous for using this meat in their regular as well as ceremonial dishes.

Buying and Storing of Cuy (in Bolivia)
Cuy can easily be procured from the local meat shops and if needed in bulk then municipal fairs in Andes are the good option. Like other meats, this meat should also be fresh. The appearance of this meat is quiet similar to rabbit meat or dark chicken flesh.
It can be stored in freezer if storage period is longer. Prepared dishes can either be stored in refrigerator it freezer and should be consumed with in 2-3 days.

Health Facts Related to Cuy Recipes
Protein content is quiet high in cuy meat and it is relatively lower in fat and cholesterol.

You might say I specialize in odd recipes…….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:01 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

From the Andean mountains

Since cuys are small, recipes call for one per person, unless the meat is cut into smaller portions. Most often, the cuy is split apart and cooked whole, with the head still attached.

A typical recipe for baked or barbequed cuy with a hot sauce:
3 or 4 cuys
50 grams of ground toasted corn, or cornmeal
2 kilos of parboiled potatoes, cut in slices
8 cloves of garlic
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
½ cup oil
½ cup water
salt, pepper and cumin to taste
Rub the cuys with a mix of the pepper, salt, pepper and cumin and bake. You can also skewer over a barbeque.
Prepare a sauce with the oil, peppers, garlic and cornmeal with the water from the potatoes or broth. Cook a few minutes until the peppers are cooked. When tender, place the meat in a serving dish and spoon the sauce over it. Serve with the boiled potatoes.
Another recipe calls for:
4 cuys
1 teaspoon hot pepper
1 tablespoon pisco (hot sauce)
garlic to taste
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
1/4 cup oil
salt, pepper to taste Season the cleaned cuys with salt, pepper, hot pepper and pisco. Fry in oil five minutes or until cooked.
Serve with a hot pepper sauce, potatoes, either fried or boiled and a salad of cucumber, tomato, lettuce and onion.

roasted cuy
2 lrg animals
marinade
2 x red onions, minced
4 x cloves of garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp of salt
2 Tbsp. water
2 Tbsp. oil
pinch  annatto (for coloring)
to rub on before roasting: 2 Tbsp. lard
dipping sauce:
more  annatto coloring
2 x white onions, minced
2 x cloves garlic
salt
healthy pinch of cumin
1 lrg cup. of roasted and grnd coffee
peanuts
3 1/2 c. lowfat milk
Directions
Mix ingredients well and spread over the inside and outside of the animal. Allow to marinate for up to one day to allow flavors to meld. Before roasting, remove excess marinade to avoid scalding. The spit should be inserted into the back part of the animal and exit from the jaw. Once on the stick, tie the front and back feet, stretching out the legs. Put on grill, turning manually. Continue to apply lard to the skin to avoid drying out the meat. The cuy is ready when the skin is close to bursting. Serve with boiled potatoes sprinkled with coriander, chilies, and the peanut sauce. If your community is especially progressive, rice may be substituted for the potatoes.
Peanut Dipping Sauce: Fry onions till golden, then add in other ingredients. Cook at low heat for at least half an hour.

fibbing cuy (so called because the Peruvian cook couldn’t find cuy in the US so he used rabbit and cooked by the cuy recipe (he didn’t know where to look)
Ingredients
1 rabbit, 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 lb (1.5 to 2 kg), cut into serving pieces
 
Marinade
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
 
Braise
2 tbsp olive oil
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon Amarillo Chile Paste
1 tablespoon Panca Chile Paste
7 tablespoons (100 ml) white wine
1 cup (250 ml) good-quality chicken stock
1/3 cup (50 g) roasted peanuts, ground
12 new potatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Directions
1.
Put the rabbit pieces in a bowl. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a bowl and use your hands to massage the marinade into the rabbit pieces, making sure they are well covered. Season with salt and pepper and leave to marinate for at least a couple hours.
2.
Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Fry the rabbit pieces on all sides until evenly browned. Remove the rabbit from the pan with a slotted spoon and add the onion. Sauté the onion until translucent and then add the chile pastes. Cook for a further couple minutes and then deglaze the pan with the white wine. Scrape vigorously to make sure nothing is sticking and then add the stock. Return the pieces of rabbit to the pan. Cover and simmer over low heat for about 1 hour.
3.
Meanwhile, boil the potatoes in plenty of water until they are firm but tender inside. Drain, and when cool enough to handle, cut the potatoes in half crosswise.
4.
Stir in the peanuts and leave to simmer uncovered for a further 30 minutes, until the sauce has thickened and the rabbit is very tender. Add the potatoes and leave them to heat through. Serve sprinkled with the parsley.

Methods of Making Cuy Recipes
• Frying – This is quite acceptable method for making cuy dishes. This cooking method is also known as Frito or choctado.
• Broiling – This is the best method adopted for making cuy recipes. Broiling makes the meat tender as well as retains the juices.
• Roasting – Al horno or roasting is the traditional cooking method for cuy.
• Baking – This is the most contemporary method of making this meat and highly adopted in urban restaurants.
• Barbequing – Huatia is the term given to this cooking process and it is highly recommended for cuy cooking. Barbeque cuy recipes are popularly served corn beer.

Cuisines Commonly Making Cuy Recipes
Andean highland is the main region where cuy is fondly eaten as one of the varieties of meat. Peruvian and Bolivian cuisines are highly famous for using this meat in their regular as well as ceremonial dishes.

Buying and Storing of Cuy (in Bolivia)
Cuy can easily be procured from the local meat shops and if needed in bulk then municipal fairs in Andes are the good option. Like other meats, this meat should also be fresh. The appearance of this meat is quiet similar to rabbit meat or dark chicken flesh.
It can be stored in freezer if storage period is longer. Prepared dishes can either be stored in refrigerator it freezer and should be consumed with in 2-3 days.

Health Facts Related to Cuy Recipes
Protein content is quiet high in cuy meat and it is relatively lower in fat and cholesterol.

You might say I specialize in odd recipes…….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:01 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

I stand on my “don’t ask, don’t tell” rule when purchasing certain items…like feed store grains for human consumption, or “pets” as protein. I’m told rats taste like squirrel….makes sense they are all rodents……one cuy is generally one serving in a South American restaurant, weight varies.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 2:30 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

I stand on my “don’t ask, don’t tell” rule when purchasing certain items…like feed store grains for human consumption, or “pets” as protein. I’m told rats taste like squirrel….makes sense they are all rodents……one cuy is generally one serving in a South American restaurant, weight varies.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 2:30 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 3, 2017 IceFire 0
Cast Iron wrote:
Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sun Apr 02, 2017 8:43 pm


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 2, 2017 Cast Iron 0
IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:The smell.
IF their urine smell that is.
Of all my livestock, I think the rabbits are the most odorous.

Rabbits smell….furry.

If you want a truly SMELLY livestock animal, the prize HAS to go to a goat buck. Does (the girls) and wethers (castrated males) as well as YOUNG intact males DO NOT stink. However, once the hormones start raging in an intact male goat (ESPECIALLY when he’s in rut) the stench is AWFUL! Not only do THEY stink, but that “funky” smell will also get on the OTHER goats in the herd, as well. Once the breeding job is done, the best place for a “billy” goat is far, FAR away from everybody else!

Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sun Apr 02, 2017 9:43 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 2, 2017 IceFire 0
Cast Iron wrote:
The smell.
IF their urine smell that is.
Of all my livestock, I think the rabbits are the most odorous.

Rabbits smell….furry.

If you want a truly SMELLY livestock animal, the prize HAS to go to a goat buck. Does (the girls) and wethers (castrated males) as well as YOUNG intact males DO NOT stink. However, once the hormones start raging in an intact male goat (ESPECIALLY when he’s in rut) the stench is AWFUL! Not only do THEY stink, but that “funky” smell will also get on the OTHER goats in the herd, as well. Once the breeding job is done, the best place for a “billy” goat is far, FAR away from everybody else!

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sat Apr 01, 2017 10:52 pm


:agree:

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 1, 2017 Cast Iron 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:

RollingwithR wrote:Wow thanks for the great info kappydell your info got my wife finally signed on 100% with the whole idea it was the tip about the babies having fur that really tipped her, I really like the one month breeding mark. So I’m going to start looking for babies. You sound like you have done this before, I’ve been doing my own research online and your info seams dead on thanks Any suggestions on where to buy some breading guinea pigs or what bread? I know I don’t want anything long haired but that’s about it. Lol can you imagine the looks were going to get at petco! Asking about the different bread characteristics? Not like that will stop me from doing it but if anyone has a better suggestion for stock procurement please share! I’ve got a bunch of spring projects started already but this has been added to list now. I have to build a new hutch and pen and everything so it might be a couple months out yet but keep an eye on this thread I will post pics of new hutch and my whole “mini piggy farm” that’s what we’re calling this little endeavor btw. Thanks again

OK…now this is getting interesting. Going to bookmark this Rolling…I’m very interested in your startup notes/progress/pics.

I know almost nothing on breeding of anything for self-sustainment except some personal research on cattle and chickens…No practical experience in any way so, ya, almost nothing.(My city wont even let me keep chickens as pets)

Just curious here…. Can you eat only guinea pigs as a meat diet or is there the real issue there of Protein poisoning like with rabbit?(Rabbit starvation)

lol…This is for sure the weirdest subject to grab my attention in a while…lol…open minds are always willing to break from social convention and be the stronger for it. I wonder if this is my way in around city ordinances…..Hmmmmm…..If they don’t make a lot of noise how would my neighbors or city officials even find out?

The smell.
IF their urine smell that is.
Of all my livestock, I think the rabbits are the most odorous.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sat Apr 01, 2017 9:36 am


:agree:

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 1, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
RollingwithR wrote:
Wow thanks for the great info kappydell your info got my wife finally signed on 100% with the whole idea it was the tip about the babies having fur that really tipped her, I really like the one month breeding mark. So I’m going to start looking for babies. You sound like you have done this before, I’ve been doing my own research online and your info seams dead on thanks Any suggestions on where to buy some breading guinea pigs or what bread? I know I don’t want anything long haired but that’s about it. Lol can you imagine the looks were going to get at petco! Asking about the different bread characteristics? Not like that will stop me from doing it but if anyone has a better suggestion for stock procurement please share! I’ve got a bunch of spring projects started already but this has been added to list now. I have to build a new hutch and pen and everything so it might be a couple months out yet but keep an eye on this thread I will post pics of new hutch and my whole “mini piggy farm” that’s what we’re calling this little endeavor btw. Thanks again

OK…now this is getting interesting. Going to bookmark this Rolling…I’m very interested in your startup notes/progress/pics.

I know almost nothing on breeding of anything for self-sustainment except some personal research on cattle and chickens…No practical experience in any way so, ya, almost nothing.(My city wont even let me keep chickens as pets)

Just curious here…. Can you eat only guinea pigs as a meat diet or is there the real issue there of Protein poisoning like with rabbit?(Rabbit starvation)

lol…This is for sure the weirdest subject to grab my attention in a while…lol…open minds are always willing to break from social convention and be the stronger for it. I wonder if this is my way in around city ordinances…..Hmmmmm…..If they don’t make a lot of noise how would my neighbors or city officials even find out?

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Sat Apr 01, 2017 9:33 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 30, 2017 Cast Iron 0
RollingwithR wrote:
Wow thanks for the great info kappydell your info got my wife finally signed on 100% with the whole idea it was the tip about the babies having fur that really tipped her, I really like the one month breeding mark. So I’m going to start looking for babies. You sound like you have done this before, I’ve been doing my own research online and your info seams dead on thanks Any suggestions on where to buy some breading guinea pigs or what bread? I know I don’t want anything long haired but that’s about it. Lol can you imagine the looks were going to get at petco! Asking about the different bread characteristics? Not like that will stop me from doing it but if anyone has a better suggestion for stock procurement please share! I’ve got a bunch of spring projects started already but this has been added to list now. I have to build a new hutch and pen and everything so it might be a couple months out yet but keep an eye on this thread I will post pics of new hutch and my whole “mini piggy farm” that’s what we’re calling this little endeavor btw. Thanks again

Just a suggestion: During the warm months, I have A-frame like hutches with weld wire runs attached, doors at both ends. The weld wire is 1×2″. Stiff and sturdy enough to pick up the light end and move, but still robust enough to handle all the moves.
I put them out in the back yard, and let them eat the grass and dandilions. Move them three or four times a day.
Do not have to mow the lawn.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Mar 30, 2017 7:36 am


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 30, 2017 Cast Iron 0
kappydell wrote:
Never thought of that, Cast…I read that you need to breed them very young for natural birthing tho…Guinea pigs are sexually mature as young as one month of age. While it is less important for the male pig to be a certain age at the time of breeding, the female needs to be less than 10 months old (at the maximum) in order to be able to give birth naturally. Typically breeding after 5 or 6 months of age is extremely risky to the sow since the pubic symphysis fuses by 10 months of age, and sometimes earlier. A sow is pregnant for 59-72 days (about 2 months) and typically has 3 piglets (although 17 has been recorded – yikes!). My absolute favorite thing about guinea pigs is that unlike other rodents, their babies are born precocial. This means they have teeth, fur, squeak and run around just like the adults when they are born. They nurse within the first few days to get colostrum but also eat big pig food, like hay, shortly after birth.

sooo…one female bred from 1 month old should average 4 litters (3 babies ave in each) before it is “too late”

Very interesting KappyDell.
Thank you for the information.
Can you speak to the dress out weight?

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Mar 30, 2017 7:33 am


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 30, 2017 RollingwithR 0

Wow thanks for the great info kappydell your info got my wife finally signed on 100% with the whole idea it was the tip about the babies having fur that really tipped her, I really like the one month breeding mark. So I’m going to start looking for babies. You sound like you have done this before, I’ve been doing my own research online and your info seams dead on thanks Any suggestions on where to buy some breading guinea pigs or what bread? I know I don’t want anything long haired but that’s about it. Lol can you imagine the looks were going to get at petco! Asking about the different bread characteristics? Not like that will stop me from doing it but if anyone has a better suggestion for stock procurement please share! I’ve got a bunch of spring projects started already but this has been added to list now. I have to build a new hutch and pen and everything so it might be a couple months out yet but keep an eye on this thread I will post pics of new hutch and my whole “mini piggy farm” that’s what we’re calling this little endeavor btw. Thanks again

Statistics: Posted by RollingwithR — Wed Mar 29, 2017 9:29 pm


:tank:

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 30, 2017 kappydell 0

Never thought of that, Cast…I read that you need to breed them very young for natural birthing tho…Guinea pigs are sexually mature as young as one month of age. While it is less important for the male pig to be a certain age at the time of breeding, the female needs to be less than 10 months old (at the maximum) in order to be able to give birth naturally. Typically breeding after 5 or 6 months of age is extremely risky to the sow since the pubic symphysis fuses by 10 months of age, and sometimes earlier. A sow is pregnant for 59-72 days (about 2 months) and typically has 3 piglets (although 17 has been recorded – yikes!). My absolute favorite thing about guinea pigs is that unlike other rodents, their babies are born precocial. This means they have teeth, fur, squeak and run around just like the adults when they are born. They nurse within the first few days to get colostrum but also eat big pig food, like hay, shortly after birth.

sooo…one female bred from 1 month old should average 4 litters (3 babies ave in each) before it is “too late”

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:11 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 29, 2017 Cast Iron 0

I do not see much of a difference between guinea pigs and rabbits.

Maybe more recipes for rabbit, especially in the French cook books.

Can a guinea pig get pregnant again just before kindling a litter?
I recently had a female rabbit kindle, pulled her out, then about 34 days later kindle again.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:06 am


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 29, 2017 kappydell 0

they are quite popular as home livestock; they are small-ish (no issue with processing/storing a huge carcass, you can harvest as needed); they are quieter than chickens, and they multiply easily.
the down side for U.S. folks is the yuck/pet factor. you can google ‘cuy’ for info it is what they are called down there. as far as looking like a rat, so do quite a few other edible critters, including rats themselves.
a good bbq sauce covers a multitude of issues with “bush meat”

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:22 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 29, 2017 RollingwithR 0

Lol I guess I could train the wife’s teacup chihuahua to heard them around the hutch yard. That’s prime you tube video right there lmao! I’d love to hear more from the lady who posted the picture everything tastes like chicken but would you eat it again? I’m seriously considering doing this for no other reason than its different I have plenty other food walking around here why not? But if you have really ate one before details would be great how did they flavor it? Did you see how they cooked it? Do you really pick one like lobster? Is it truly mainstream food down there or is it kinda an odditie? Thanks for all the input people…

Statistics: Posted by RollingwithR — Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:32 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 23, 2017 IceFire 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Too close to being a rat to interest me. I’ll stick with chickens. Duel purpose that way.

Same here…Guinea pig is just WAY too much like a rat. Chickens, at least, are dual purpose…eggs as well as meat. Plus, I already HAVE the chickens!

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:53 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 22, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

nothing new – even Hollyweird has picked up on it – on Walking Dead a couple of seasons ago the hospital group of survivors had a guinea pig ranch going for their meat supplement ….

years ago on DoomsDay Preppers – one of the very strangest couple of preppers had a suburban ranch established for SHTF purposes – but was selling off their stock for pets and medical lab experimenting ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Wed Mar 22, 2017 9:18 am


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Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 22, 2017 Stahlrosen 0

The only thing about guinea pigs that may be difficult for some is maintaining their Vit. C requirement. I would also think raising rabbits would be a better return on an investment. Never ate a guinea pig, but had many as pets. They are really a lot of fun. I think I would have a hard time eating something that purred. And yes, I know if you are desperate you will eat anything, but if I have the option, I’ll pass.

Statistics: Posted by Stahlrosen — Wed Mar 22, 2017 9:05 am


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Livestock and more • Guinea pigs as livestock??????

March 22, 2017 RollingwithR 0

I would not have ever thought of a guinea pig as food until I saw one of those strange food shows on tv. Apparently in south America there are restaurants with guinea pig cages up front where you choose a live guinea pig much like the lobster tanks we see in restaurants here in the USA. I would imagine it’s kinda like raising rabbits for food but really I have no idea. All the information I can find about guinea pigs comes from keeping one or 2 as pets, nothing about raising several as a food source. Is there specific breeds that are better for food? Since they are picked live in the restaurant like lobster I’m assuming skining and cleaning will be quick and easy but really I have no idea. Has anyone eles heard of this? Anyone tried it? Im just toying with this idea after seeing it on that tv show, any and all thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Statistics: Posted by RollingwithR — Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:36 am


:offtopic:

Livestock and more • Re: Meat Grinders

March 2, 2017 Murby 0

I have a 1hp Cabela’s meat grinder.. It chews through venison and pork as fast as I can shove it in. Doesn’t matter if its frozen or thawed, new or aged..

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Wed Mar 01, 2017 9:23 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Meat Grinders

February 28, 2017 Cast Iron 0
RockinB wrote:

IceFire wrote:I don’t process that much meat, so I stick with the hand-crank models…I have two…one slightly smaller, and one larger one. I like the hand-crank ones for times when the power isn’t working. When it is, I have the meat grinder attachment for my KitchenAid mixer.

My wife says we’ll burn up her Kitchen Aide stand mixer running livestock through it. We have the grain mill attachment and it works great but I think she wont budge on the meat grinder.

I think your wife is right.

I use a Kitchen Aide for grinding meat.
But I only grind 5lbs at a time.

From the research I have done, look for all metal gears.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Feb 28, 2017 7:38 am


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Livestock and more • Re: Keeping rabbit water from freezing.

February 28, 2017 RollingwithR 0

Here’s how we deal with frozen rabbit water in eastern WA (-10 at night) I was tired of refilling thier bottle’s every day to so I cut the tops off the plastic water bottle’s and with a little heat fitted them onto the end of a 4 in pvc pipe that was about 5 ft long. At first I attached it to the outside of the cage with zip tyes with the nipple going thru the wire mesh into cage. This worked great all summer only requires filled once every week to 10 days. It froze sold in winter thoe. So I added a few 3in pieces of 1/2in black iron pipe as a spacer between water pipe/bottle and cage. I then got a 6ft section of heat tape wrapped the water pipe/bottle and the wrapped pipe/bottle in pipe insulation. The spacer keeps heat tape out the rabbits reach. The heat tape uses less power than a old style light bulb. Works great

Statistics: Posted by RollingwithR — Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:14 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Having livestock and no plan!!

February 4, 2017 Cast Iron 0
IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Heck, even my one neighbor could not understand why the livestock were not in the barn in the summer. They are where they are supposed to be; Out in the fields.

Apparently, your neighbor does NOT understand that barns are for sheltering animals in inclement/winter weather. In summer, they MUCH prefer being out where they can eat nice, fresh, GREEN stuff; roll in the grass; and enjoy the warmth of the sun. Being cooped up in a barn is like us being locked in a bathroom all day. Who wants that?

Quite right.

Even my Amish neighbors gave him a funny look when he made the comment.

Come spring, all the live stock look forward to getting back out in the fields. We actually hold a small party with friends to watch as the livestock run out and enjoy the fresh air, sun, and new green stuff to eat.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sat Feb 04, 2017 3:06 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Having livestock and no plan!!

February 2, 2017 IceFire 0
Cast Iron wrote:
Heck, even my one neighbor could not understand why the livestock were not in the barn in the summer. They are where they are supposed to be; Out in the fields.

Apparently, your neighbor does NOT understand that barns are for sheltering animals in inclement/winter weather. In summer, they MUCH prefer being out where they can eat nice, fresh, GREEN stuff; roll in the grass; and enjoy the warmth of the sun. Being cooped up in a barn is like us being locked in a bathroom all day. Who wants that?

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Thu Feb 02, 2017 4:00 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Having livestock and no plan!!

February 2, 2017 Cast Iron 0

What I see are people who think everything should be like a Disney movie.

I treat my livestock well, spoiled even. Not only for their well being, but they are an investment as well.

Heck, even my one neighbor could not understand why the livestock were not in the barn in the summer. They are where they are supposed to be; Out in the fields.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Feb 02, 2017 1:21 pm


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Livestock and more • Re: Having livestock and no plan!!

February 1, 2017 IceFire 0

I understood exactly what you were saying, Farmer. As to the cows, you saved the three, and saved the fourth from a slow, painful death. A quick bullet to the head is MUCH more merciful. Something that city people and the “PETA” types do NOT understand. Another thing that the city folks don’t understand is the “carrying capacity” of the land, for stock density. Also, the carrying capacity in one area will be different than the carrying capacity in another, due to factors such as soil fertility, water availability, native vegetation etc. People are idiots. I much prefer animals.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Tue Jan 31, 2017 9:00 pm