:wave:

Introduce Yourself • Re: New Member 9.20.17

September 21, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
IceFire wrote:
Welcome! A good place to start for answering your questions about storing water, food, etc. is in the “How to Start Prepping-the Basics” section. Here’s the link http://www.americanpreppersnetwork.net/viewforum.php?f=616

Yep…great link to get you going.

Welcome to APN..As others have stated a lot of great info.

Click “Portal” at the top to see the most current topics and then below them the general areas with threads galore….A HUGE resource is to be had here for you and your hubby even if you never talk to others, but please feel free to ask questions as there’s a lot of helpful folks here.

Again, Welcome…. :wave:

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:46 am


:wave:

Introduce Yourself • Re: New Member 9.20.17

September 21, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
IceFire wrote:
Welcome! A good place to start for answering your questions about storing water, food, etc. is in the “How to Start Prepping-the Basics” section. Here’s the link http://www.americanpreppersnetwork.net/viewforum.php?f=616

Yep…great link to get you going.

Welcome to APN..As others have stated a lot of great info.

Click “Portal” at the top to see the most current topics and then below them the general areas with threads galore….A HUGE resource is to be had here for you and your hubby even if you never talk to others, but please feel free to ask questions as there’s a lot of helpful folks here.

Again, Welcome…. :wave:

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Thu Sep 21, 2017 10:46 am


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Introduce Yourself • Re: New but slowly making progress

September 21, 2017 kappydell 0

All good ideas mentioned here. As a long time prepper, most of my preps are/were put by on a low budget. Aldi’s has the best retail prices I’ve seen, Sams club can vary – around here it is expensive. As a retired person with more time than money, perhaps you can use some of my research ‘finds’….
1. Feed stores can be cheap sources of bulk grains, but you will have to put them into mylar or other storage on your own. You also need to make sure you purchase plain, untinkered with grain. But since the day a feed store employee told me he fed his own family from the feed store wheat & corn, I am comfortable with it. It hard to argue with being able to store whole dried field corn (for hominy, cornmeal, grits, etc) for the price of $12 for 50 lbs. Whole kernels of corn are superior anyway, as the natural oils in corn start turning rancid right after grinding.
I’ve also found red wheat in 50 lb sacks for a similar price. Very basic, but very cheap.
2. Check ethnic stores – you can often find terrific deals on rice and dried beans in a Mexican store, or an Indian store. Korean stores sometimes sell acorn flour (if you want to see how acorn meal would taste – might be nice to know if acorns are a potential resource). Canned goods from other countries often include foods you cant easily find canned in the US, but watch the prices.
3. Dented can places. I was lucky to find a canning company that sold dented cans (after they inspected them to make sure the seals were not affected) for $6 a case. Selection was whatever they had on hand, but generally I could get corn, green beans, beets & canned potatoes every time; other times I would find peas (I always grabbed those, they disappeared quickly), spinach, carrots, kraut, mixed vegetables and sometimes pickled beets or applesauce (in cases of glass jars). This place has a good turnover, as folks from several counties around would come to buy and their #10 cans ($1 apiece) were particularly popular with charity food kitchens, the VFW, and nursing homes. Its worth checking to see if there is such a place near you…I plan on returning annually (when I go to fish for Salmon) to stock up. Such a place is worth the search for it and imho will be worth the 480 mile drive to get to it annually after I move (unless I can find one closer).
4. Prep KNOWLEDGE, not stuff. Stuff can be taken/confiscated/stolen, get lost, break, and otherwise fail. Know-how (how to make a rocket stove from bricks lying around after a tornado hits, for example) can not be taken away from you and allows better improvisation to fit changing situations. The library is free; I used the free internet there for many years, downloading and taking notes, or putting on personal disks (and later thumb drives) until I could learn it, or print it out. Best though, is to try these new things out, learning as you go.
5. Learn to store and put up your own foods. A dehydrator is a good buy (often around Christmas) and you can easily dehydrated frozen veggies (no need to blanch, it is already done) easily, until you find alternate bulk food sources. 16 cups of frozen corn dries down to around 5 cups of dried corn – if your family likes corn, it is one of the most popular dried veggies, as it rehydrates well & with a good flavor & texture. You can also dry applesauce (on the little trays, or line your screen with plastic wrap) for home made fruit roll ups. Lots of fun, easy to do, takes only a little power. Canning is not all that hard, and canned foods are familiar comfort foods in a crisis. The canners can get expensive tho, so if you have an older relative with a canner, ask to borrow it (and maybe for lessons). Thrift shops in areas transitioning from rural to urban, or mixed areas often have canners available cheap. I got my first three canners for $10 each.

Yes, it can take a while, and in light of todays situations, I’d try to learn as much as possible of critical skills – what forage foods are in your particular area/neighborhood & how to cook them, how to make a shelter and a fire for starters. How to live reasonably well without power or help. A little networking is free. You are waaaay ahead of most folks in that you are aware of the need, and actively doing something. So congratulations, and keep up the good work.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:10 pm


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Introduce Yourself • New Member 9.20.17

September 21, 2017 CG141fas 0

Good Evening Everyone,
I just registered. I have been prepping for a couple of years, but my budget is tight so I prep a little at a time. I would like to learn more about storing water and/or manually pumping water from a well when the “lights go out”. My husband is on board with becoming more self reliant, but I don’t talk to anyone else about it. I’m looking forward to communicating with you all.
CG141fas

Statistics: Posted by CG141fas — Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:44 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Hi from Ottawa Canada :-)

September 19, 2017 Blondie 0

I guess I’m closest being 2 hrs from SSM.

While I have good friends in Cabbage Town outside of Toronto, they don’t Prep. The shootings at your Parliament building were unnerving to me. This was not Canada.

If you need anything, shout!

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:42 am


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Introduce Yourself • Re: ripshinmtn-new prepper-old country canning methods

September 19, 2017 popcandave 0

My wife and I canned this way for many years. The only thing different is we used large,round washtubs to can in.
We’d put a sheet of tin over the top to keep the heat in. When we were done we both smelled like smoke and it
didn’t take long before we headed for the shower.

I guess we’ve gotten old. For now we use our two pressure canners. :sleep:

Statistics: Posted by popcandave — Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:31 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Hi from Ottawa Canada :-)

September 19, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Windy64 wrote:
Hi everybody – I am really glad to have found this site! I am a single mom of a 14-year old boy and live in Ottawa. I have been prepping for awhile now, but my ultimate wish would be to find a great community in my area, and if there are any within say 100 km (60 miles) of Ottawa, I would LOVE to talk and meet you. It is so hard being the only prepper I know lol, so please say “hi” if you would also appreciate joining other preppers in our area, and even setting up a new homestead together OTG (off the grid). If you already live in an OTG community, and are looking for new members, I would be soooooo grateful if you got in touch. Thanks so much and have a great day! Gisele :thumbsup:

Welcome aboard. I am in PA so Im a bit far from Ottawa but there are other people from Canada here although Im not sure if they’re near your area. It would be interesting to see what prepping is like in Canada and how it differs from prepping in most places in the USA.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:14 pm


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Introduce Yourself • ripshinmtn-new prepper-old country canning methods

September 18, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

Hello

I have just joined and all of you have already helped me so very much by assuring me the Golden Harvest lids and rings are good and very few problems.

I have a rekindled interest in canning and food prep. I developed a interest in canning before I left home for the US Army when I was 18 yrs old back in 1970. I remember my family canned over 500 quarts of green beans plus corn, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, peaches, kraut, squash, beets, pickles and other stuff i can’t remember. OH, YES! Also pickled eggs, pickled corn, pickled beans, pickled okra! Plus pork, chicken, and beef, jellies and jams.

We didn’t have pressure cookers back then. We used the submerged boiling water method. No stove tops were used here. We
used very long watering tubs/bath tub types (approx six feet long) that were actually used by farmers to water their live stock in. We dug
out trenches for 8 tubs, put 4 cinder blocks on each side and one cinder block on each end of the tubs. The trenches that the tubs sat over
were 2 1/2 feet deep and we built wooden fires under the water filled tubs. The glass canning jars were put into the cold water filled tubs with cloth rags sandwiched between the jars to prevent breakage. The water came to a rolling boil and did so for many, many hours for each canning cycle. I cannot remember one jar that was ever broken during our canning. The water and jars were allowed to cool down
on their own time at which time we removed the hot jars from the water and stored them in a spare room waiting for the lids to seal.
Of all the thousands of canned jars, I cannot remember one jar that did not seal. 8 very large farm watering tubs canned a lot of food in one day’s work.

We had a 3 acre garden and produced two crops of vegetables for our use and to sell to people in the nearby small towns. Plus a lot of apples.

The wood for the fires was purchased from a local lumber saw mill and was white pine that burned very well and hot.
When I came home four years later from the US Army, we went through the whole thing again. I then began college and canning was a thing of the past.

This all happened in North East Tennessee near Tennessee’s oldest community(Elizabethton) dating back into the mid 1700s.

I hope that you folks enjoyed this look at the past of when people really believed in putting up a whole lot of food freshly grown.

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Mon Sep 18, 2017 6:44 pm


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Introduce Yourself • ripshinmtn-new prepper-old country canning methods

September 18, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

Hello

I have just joined and all of you have already helped me so very much by assuring me the Golden Harvest lids and rings are good and very few problems.

I have a rekindled interest in canning and food prep. I developed a interest in canning before I left home for the US Army when I was 18 yrs old back in 1970. I remember my family canned over 500 quarts of green beans plus corn, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, peaches, kraut, squash, beets, pickles and other stuff i can’t remember. OH, YES! Also pickled eggs, pickled corn, pickled beans, pickled okra! Plus pork, chicken, and beef, jellies and jams.

We didn’t have pressure cookers back then. We used the submerged boiling water method. No stove tops were used here. We
used very long watering tubs/bath tub types (approx six feet long) that were actually used by farmers to water their live stock in. We dug
out trenches for 8 tubs, put 4 cinder blocks on each side and one cinder block on each end of the tubs. The trenches that the tubs sat over
were 2 1/2 feet deep and we built wooden fires under the water filled tubs. The glass canning jars were put into the cold water filled tubs with cloth rags sandwiched between the jars to prevent breakage. The water came to a rolling boil and did so for many, many hours for each canning cycle. I cannot remember one jar that was ever broken during our canning. The water and jars were allowed to cool down
on their own time at which time we removed the hot jars from the water and stored them in a spare room waiting for the lids to seal.
Of all the thousands of canned jars, I cannot remember one jar that did not seal. 8 very large farm watering tubs canned a lot of food in one day’s work.

We had a 3 acre garden and produced two crops of vegetables for our use and to sell to people in the nearby small towns. Plus a lot of apples.

The wood for the fires was purchased from a local lumber saw mill and was white pine that burned very well and hot.
When I came home four years later from the US Army, we went through the whole thing again. I then began college and canning was a thing of the past.

This all happened in North East Tennessee near Tennessee’s oldest community(Elizabethton) dating back into the mid 1700s.

I hope that you folks enjoyed this look at the past of when people really believed in putting up a whole lot of food freshly grown.

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Mon Sep 18, 2017 6:44 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Golden Harvest Canning jars and lids

September 18, 2017 ripshinmtn 0

HI again Everyone

Thanks so much for the your nice, prompt replies. I am more confident now that you have replied to my questions, Also, I found some info
where the Jarden Corporation replied to a question and stated that the Golden Harvest lids and rings were made to the same quality as Ball and Kerr in the same town and state. However, the packaging is not as fancy and therefore we can buy the Golden Harvest products much cheaper because we’re not paying for more expensive, fancy packaging.

I feel much safer now. Thanks Everyone!

ripshinmtn

Statistics: Posted by ripshinmtn — Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:41 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: Golden Harvest Canning jars and lids

September 18, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

the Newell Corporation owns most of the home DIY canning biz these days – but Ball and Harvest Day are NOT the same company nor is the manufacturing necessarily done at the same plants with the same QC controls & quality ….

if you think you are guaranteed Ball quality at the cheaper Harvest Day pricing – think again ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:59 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Hi from Ottawa Canada :-)

September 18, 2017 Windy64 0

Hi everybody – I am really glad to have found this site! I am a single mom of a 14-year old boy and live in Ottawa. I have been prepping for awhile now, but my ultimate wish would be to find a great community in my area, and if there are any within say 100 km (60 miles) of Ottawa, I would LOVE to talk and meet you. It is so hard being the only prepper I know lol, so please say “hi” if you would also appreciate joining other preppers in our area, and even setting up a new homestead together OTG (off the grid). If you already live in an OTG community, and are looking for new members, I would be soooooo grateful if you got in touch. Thanks so much and have a great day! Gisele :thumbsup:

Statistics: Posted by Windy64 — Mon Sep 18, 2017 12:28 pm


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Introduce Yourself • New prepper in MA

September 18, 2017 oldsoldier181 0

Good morning, I am not REALLY new to prepping, just new to the community. I have been a student of preparedness for, well, decades now. However, until very recently, I have done it passively.
Given the current state of the world, I am beginning to become a little more proactive with my prepping, and decided to find like minded individuals. So, here I am!!!
A little about me:
I was active duty Army from 1988-1991, then national guard until 96. Got out, went back in in 1999, got out again for good in 2005. All as an infantryman. I am an outdoorsman, I used to hike quite a bit, I am a passable woodsman, I have failed at hunting (but LOVE turkey hunting), have been involved with firearms since I was 12, and am a lifetime NRA member.
As to non prepping hobbies, I am an avid motorcycle rider, a freemason, a bagpiper, and thoroughly enjoy reading almost anything. I am divorced, and currently in a part time relationship (I dont understand it either). I live in a small community in MA, and I dont like cats :)

Statistics: Posted by oldsoldier181 — Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:13 am


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Introduce Yourself • Hello from Hutto, Tx

September 18, 2017 04Cougar 0

I’m in a real pickle. I’ve been out of work for over a year. I don’t have friends because I’m taken advantage of all too often. I don’t have any form of transportation. And, I don’t have any place to go when shtf. I’m currently living with family that’s too complacent to see reality. So, I’m looking for anyone that can use an extra hand.

Statistics: Posted by 04Cougar — Mon Sep 18, 2017 3:16 am


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Introduce Yourself • Re: New Members, Welcome to our forum!

September 17, 2017 cwren58 0

Hi I live in Chester county but close to Rock hill. I am not southern born but am from the Midwest–I love it here!
I like to be prepared– not so much for the end of the world but for big emergencies like what happened recently with the Hurricane scare. I am not a gardener because my health prohibits the physical work involved–and the heat.
I do buy foods on sale and stock up. I have a chest freezer, a dehydrator and a food saver vacuum sealer. We moved recently so I let my stash get low-I’ve moved with preps before and it is not fun.
I have a carry license and am about to take a class for ham radio license. To me, it is enjoyable to prepare. I expect there to be more and more big events coming up, and someday I expect my personal beliefs will end up on the chopping block so being prepared is just smart. I thought it might be nice to find a group and see what’s going on in SC. as far as prepping is concerned. Thank you For Welcoming me! Cwren.
(Carolina Wren–duh) :)

Statistics: Posted by cwren58 — Sun Sep 17, 2017 1:22 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Re: New to Forum

September 16, 2017 DRKDLive 0

Hello all! My wife and I joined so we can be prepared for anything that comes at us, especially with the current issues not only in our country, but the world. We live in the Florida panhandle and got lucky this past week and it painted a picture in our heads that I care not to revisit. We are excited and ready to begin prepping with guidance and experience from this group. Thank you!

Statistics: Posted by DRKDLive — Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:59 pm