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The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have!

April 22, 2017 gman 0

The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have! Hunting is not just all about having high-end weapons and other equipment, but it is also about overcoming the harsh and most inconvenient environment. Thus, to be an effective hunter, you should be prepared for whatever is ahead of your hunting venture. You should take note of these … Continue reading The Essential Things All Hunters Should Have!

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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 29, 2017 kappydell 0

I am puzzled by the either-or comments of so many. why not learn & practice both skillsets?

I for example am LEO experienced, my prep partner is former military BUT we both have leaned (and still are learning & practicing) hunting, trapping and foraging skills. We (for better or worse) tend to laugh at the Naked & Afraid folks who are so busy with personal issues that they refuse to work together to utilize their resources, or only know limited ways to start fires, get foods, build shelter, etc.

Wise preppers learn all they can and don’t worry about labels or whether they “like” someone to work alongside them for a common goal.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Mar 29, 2017 3:05 pm


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 16, 2017 Cast Iron 0
sageprice wrote:
I’m not sure I got my point across. I believe is stealth over rapid fire, in defense over offense, guerrilla over formation.
You can spray the woods with your ARs but your just wasting ammo. Shoot and run means the enemy will waste their supplies, which will be limited by what they carry. Yours are in preplanned in small caches.
Even a 22 is deadly and locating the source is difficult, especially if you have been shooting in your territory at long distances. Remember a head shot is efficient. You are going after a kill not a trophy.
Even loose formations are easier to pin down than scattered guerrilla snippers. Vietnam taught us that, a very hard lesson.
In short, do not go looking for trouble, hide from trouble, and have the home field advantage.

I, for one, got your point quite well: “He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.” Sun Tuz.
Sun Tuz was required reading when I was in the Marines.

The point I am making is, in order to conduct guerrilla operations efficiently, the need to master the fundamentals of marksmanship, to be an expert or better a master rifleman, before operations commence.
OJT is not a real thing.
Husband your ammunition. Why use two or more shots if one will do. SHTF, there may be no resupply. The big box stores are likely closed.

Contrary to popular belief, these skills can be practiced in a rural area, at low cost, and on a regular basis. No need for specialized fire arms, other than a .22LR. No need for a indoor range, if you have access to the space. No special targets are needed, sift through the recycle bin or print off reduced sized targets.
Take the training and knowledge and expand on it or practice it on a regular basis.
If I really wanted to, I could hump it out to my range and practice now, despite the several inches of snow we got recently, and single digit temperatures. I have never tried shooting in snowshoes before. Might be something I should try.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:19 am


Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 15, 2017 sageprice 0

I’m not sure I got my point across. I believe is stealth over rapid fire, in defense over offense, guerrilla over formation.
You can spray the woods with your ARs but your just wasting ammo. Shoot and run means the enemy will waste their supplies, which will be limited by what they carry. Yours are in preplanned in small caches.
Even a 22 is deadly and locating the source is difficult, especially if you have been shooting in your territory at long distances. Remember a head shot is efficient. You are going after a kill not a trophy.
Even loose formations are easier to pin down than scattered guerrilla snippers. Vietnam taught us that, a very hard lesson.
In short, do not go looking for trouble, hide from trouble, and have the home field advantage.

Statistics: Posted by sageprice — Wed Mar 15, 2017 11:56 am


Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Photon Guy wrote:
In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

I live in a rural area.

Formal firearms training does require some travel.
Sig Academy is not far from me comparatively to, say, Gunsite.

Training in rural areas is not hard at all. If you have the land, set up your own course of fire. Does not have to be full on NRA High-Power, across the course, but the use of reduced sized targets, using .22LR rather than full power is just as effective.
Having mastery of the fundamentals is what marksmanship is.
Then apply some of COL Jeff Cooper’s drills to improve. Start slow but smooth at first. With time comes speed.

There are several martial arts school within thirty minutes of me.
Unfortunately, none are Krav Maga.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:29 pm


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Photon Guy wrote:
In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

I live in a rural area.

Formal firearms training does require some travel.
Sig Academy is not far from me comparatively to, say, Gunsite.

Training in rural areas is not hard at all. If you have the land, set up your own course of fire. Does not have to be full on NRA High-Power, across the course, but the use of reduced sized targets, using .22LR rather than full power is just as effective.
Having mastery of the fundamentals is what marksmanship is.
Then apply some of COL Jeff Cooper’s drills to improve. Start slow but smooth at first. With time comes speed.

There are several martial arts school within thirty minutes of me.
Unfortunately, none are Krav Maga.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:29 pm


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Alwaysthenewguy wrote:
In our modern society I know a lot of guys who are hunters, but are not warriors by any stretch of the imagination. I also know warriors, legit martial artists, cops and may ex-military, who are decent to excellent warriors within their areas of expertise, who know nothing about hunting. With that said, I have been doing some reading and studying about the Native American warrior culture. In particular the plains Indians. They would not have understood how you could have one without the other.

When the plains obtained horses and became mobile hunters, it effected their culture, elevating the role the hunter played in their society. Also due to the fact they were traveling further and competing for food from other tribes, the warriors became more important also. In fact to be a man in that society you had to be both a warrior and a hunter. The two skills were so related that they didn’t really see the difference, warriors were hunters, and hunters were warriors. Navigation, horsemanship, terrain analysis, tracking, camouflage, stealth, knowing how your prey thinks, and skill at arms, were all related to both activities.

I grew up among hunters in rural America. And even now hunting plays a huge roll in my family culture, the whole family hunts. But many people I’m around working as a cop in an urban area, do not have the first clue about being in the woods or hunting. I just wanted to hear your guys thoughts on the subject. I see them as being important related skills, but also know a lot of guys who are without question effective warriors in society now. I also know a lot of hunters that don’t have the first clue about how to win a fight.

In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:53 am


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 14, 2017 Photon Guy 0
Alwaysthenewguy wrote:
In our modern society I know a lot of guys who are hunters, but are not warriors by any stretch of the imagination. I also know warriors, legit martial artists, cops and may ex-military, who are decent to excellent warriors within their areas of expertise, who know nothing about hunting. With that said, I have been doing some reading and studying about the Native American warrior culture. In particular the plains Indians. They would not have understood how you could have one without the other.

When the plains obtained horses and became mobile hunters, it effected their culture, elevating the role the hunter played in their society. Also due to the fact they were traveling further and competing for food from other tribes, the warriors became more important also. In fact to be a man in that society you had to be both a warrior and a hunter. The two skills were so related that they didn’t really see the difference, warriors were hunters, and hunters were warriors. Navigation, horsemanship, terrain analysis, tracking, camouflage, stealth, knowing how your prey thinks, and skill at arms, were all related to both activities.

I grew up among hunters in rural America. And even now hunting plays a huge roll in my family culture, the whole family hunts. But many people I’m around working as a cop in an urban area, do not have the first clue about being in the woods or hunting. I just wanted to hear your guys thoughts on the subject. I see them as being important related skills, but also know a lot of guys who are without question effective warriors in society now. I also know a lot of hunters that don’t have the first clue about how to win a fight.

In the environment that the American Indians lived in, you had to both hunt for food and fight against competing tribes, and later on, the competing white man. In this day and age and in the environment the modern American lives in, you can get along fine with just one of those fields, or as I see all too often, you can get along just fine with neither. Today we’ve got police to protect us, or so the steeple think, so you don’t have to be able to fight even though when seconds count the police are minutes away. You don’t have to hunt for food when you can just go to the supermarket and buy whatever food you want. The necessary skills of the modern day is being able to work at a desk, being able to get promoted to a high position in the company, and being able to rake in the dough since dough is the answer to everything since today you can just buy whatever you need unlike in the days of the American Indians when you all too often had to find or hunt for what you needed to survive. We are so spoiled in this modern day with all the modern conveniences. But if you grow up in a rural environment as you did than you will learn to hunt most likely and there is a good chance you will grow up shooting guns. I grew up in suburban NJ and my dad was a professor of political science and my mom was a graphic designer and neither were into guns so didn’t shoot guns that much as a child except in Boy Scout camp. As for hunting and shooting guns in rural areas Im not sure how much tactical training you might get with guns. There is a big difference between shooting at paper targets or shooting at bottles and cans, which you might do in a rural area, vs shooting and using guns tactically. Even if you’re skilled at shooting at living, moving targets as you would be if you’re a good hunter does not mean you will be good in a gunfight. So I think its good that you grew up hinting and are skilled with guns although as I said, there is a difference between being tactically skilled with guns vs just being skilled with guns. Maybe you have done some tactical gun training and drills. I don’t know. Im not sure how hard it is to find such training in rural areas and so finding such training might involve some traveling.

What I do consider a downside, in my opinion, with growing up in a rural area is that certain warrior skills are hard to find. You did mention martial arts in your post. In a rural area you are probably not going to find martial arts schools. For me I consider martial arts to be an utmost important skill, even more important than being skilled with guns, but that’s just me. I was lucky that I grew up with a really good dojo not far from me and so I got to learn martial arts. In an urban or suburban area you will have more access to various resources and skills. It helps when you don’t have to drive for hours to get to the nearest city or major town. Having trained heavily in the martial arts and with a good amount of training in the tactical use of firearms I would say I’ve got good skills as a warrior. As a hunter, I do know a little and I have gone hunting a few times. I would like to learn more about hunting I just need to put aside the time and more importantly the money. Hunting is an expensive activity.

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:53 am


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Hunting • Re: The Hunter/Warrior combo, how important is it?

March 11, 2017 Major French 0

Donot underestimate our liberal foes. First, yellow dog Democrats have stockpiled revolvers and sporting guns for decades. Undoubtedly, they will arm their Snowflake allies likewise. These militias will be a formidable threat, also. Second, there is an emergent movement among the Snowflakes to arm themselves with the most modern semiautomatics, too. Empirical evidence: The Huey P. Newton gun club.
When fifty Snowflakes hold AR-15s on your family while they take your food, vehicles weapons, and women? To prevent this same scenario, our vigilance is required.

If your idea of a modern is a 5-8 shot revolver, then that needs to change immediately. I realize not everybody can afford a Glock, but you can afford Canik 55 TP 9 or poly Witness 9mm, too. See? Cheap does not mean garbage, too. The WASR-10 is cheapest quality, But the VZ 2008 is probably a wiser choice, too.

Among the AR-15 choices is an upgraded Anderson assembly. Think adding A Fail Zero or CFA BCG and a Raptor or BCM ambi charging handle too. By helping improve feeding and extraction, you you are improving the weapon’s reliability, too. See? You don’t need a Wilson Combat AR for $2,000, too. Again, cheap does not mean garbage.

For the budget minded, Chinese SKS carbine can fulfill the pricier weapons’ defensive duties. Just run it stock and $280.00, used Chinese. The objective is? Modern pistols and rifles for all of your group in case of civil unrest or worse, Rodney King, Andrew, Katrina, and Joplin are proof it does happen here, too

Ammo? Again, avoid commie ammo in Western guns. But you don’t need +P or Zombie or specialized ammo for fifty dollars a box, too.
It is far wiser to stockpile modestly priced, albeit quality ammo is expanding type ammo ammo. Privi Partizan[PPU], Remington, Sellier & Bernet, American Eagle, Fiocchi, Federal, PMC, Speer, and Freedom Munitions are all wise albeit cheap choices here. This way, you can practice regularly but have more to stockpile, also. Again, cheap should not mean garbage.

Statistics: Posted by Major French — Sat Mar 11, 2017 3:12 am


7 Best Bow Hunting Tips

January 7, 2017 Cari Schofield 0

In order to be a great bow hunter, you’ll have to go through years of training and experience. It’s just like playing a musical instrument; at first, you don’t know what you’re doing, but with a lot of practice and determination, you’ll find yourself playing sonatas. It’s just the same with archery and bow hunting, […]

The post 7 Best Bow Hunting Tips appeared first on American Preppers Network.