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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Gunns 0
Permafrost wrote:
I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

I imagine everything outside stays frozen in the winter where you are at.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:46 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Gunns 0
Permafrost wrote:
I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

I imagine everything outside stays frozen in the winter where you are at.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:46 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Permafrost 0

I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:58 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Permafrost 0

I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:58 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Homestead

June 29, 2017 IceFire 0

According to dictionary.com homesteading is “any dwelling with its land and buildings where a family makes its home.”

Nowadays, though, when most people use the term ‘homestead’ they are referring to a home where people are trying to be self-sufficient.

As to why it’s important, when the trappings of modern society collapse, people are going to NEED to be self-sufficient…producing their own food (or enough surplus of something that they can barter/trade with someone else for what they don’t/can’t produce themselves); having an accessible source of clean water; having the means to heat their home, cook, etc.; being able to have sanitation; and being able to provide for their other needs.

That’s why many of us have gotten OUT of the cities and towns, bought acreage, and are working to establish a homestead of our own.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Jun 28, 2017 8:41 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Homestead

June 29, 2017 IceFire 0

According to dictionary.com homesteading is “any dwelling with its land and buildings where a family makes its home.”

Nowadays, though, when most people use the term ‘homestead’ they are referring to a home where people are trying to be self-sufficient.

As to why it’s important, when the trappings of modern society collapse, people are going to NEED to be self-sufficient…producing their own food (or enough surplus of something that they can barter/trade with someone else for what they don’t/can’t produce themselves); having an accessible source of clean water; having the means to heat their home, cook, etc.; being able to have sanitation; and being able to provide for their other needs.

That’s why many of us have gotten OUT of the cities and towns, bought acreage, and are working to establish a homestead of our own.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Jun 28, 2017 8:41 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 20, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Dolomite lime is not strong enough to work in the outhouse. The best, cheapest lime to use is construction lime used in mixing plaster and brick mortar, known as Flint Coat or Type F lime. Don’t know for sure but I think quick lime was placed on the hazardous materials list by the EPA people a number of years ago. Haven’t seen any for sale in many moons.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:18 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Type of lime for an outhouse

June 20, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

This is just a question for anyone who has an outhouse or uses lime on raw sewage. What kind of lime do you use? I’m getting some garden lime for gardening and was wondering what kind of lime is used to treat sewage; e.g. I’ve read stuff that says to throw some wood ash or lime onto excreta because it will help to inactivate pathogens, which is the same reason they used to use it on corpses in burial pits. I thought it would be good to have on hand for an SHFT situation. But, the more I look at it, the more confusing it is. There’s dolomite lime, hydrated lime, quicklime, garden lime, and that’s just a partial list. Any info. is appreciated. Thanks in advance to everyone.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue Jun 20, 2017 11:11 am


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General Homesteading Topics • FREE Ticket for 3rd Annual Home Grown Food Summit.

June 6, 2017 dem 0

http://ddddddd.ontraport.com/c/s/7xR/YObX/6/sr/9iA/6ZtdGl/zTTH4qiz6l/P full week of experts in many areas, all online and FREE. :thumbsup:So for 38+ of the brightest minds in:

Permaculture

Natural health

Vegetable gardening

Homesteading

Urban growing, and

Sustainable living

… To freely give away their insights and teachings, all to help contribute to this shared vision?

Statistics: Posted by dem — Tue Jun 06, 2017 11:43 am


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General Homesteading Topics • FREE Ticket for 3rd Annual Home Grown Food Summit.

June 6, 2017 dem 0

http://ddddddd.ontraport.com/c/s/7xR/YObX/6/sr/9iA/6ZtdGl/zTTH4qiz6l/P full week of experts in many areas, all online and FREE. :thumbsup:So for 38+ of the brightest minds in:

Permaculture

Natural health

Vegetable gardening

Homesteading

Urban growing, and

Sustainable living

… To freely give away their insights and teachings, all to help contribute to this shared vision?

Statistics: Posted by dem — Tue Jun 06, 2017 11:43 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 27, 2017 Cin 0

Please be careful – permethrin is deadly to cats.

I have three cats to keep our mice population down. We use a spray with permethrin in it on our clothes when we go out in the woods, but we keep it away from the cats.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:46 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 27, 2017 Cin 0

Please be careful – permethrin is deadly to cats.

I have three cats to keep our mice population down. We use a spray with permethrin in it on our clothes when we go out in the woods, but we keep it away from the cats.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:46 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 26, 2017 anita 0

My tick population has increased since I’ve had to keep my chickens in the run, due to the local hawks that are illegal to do anything to. (I do mean local.)

“All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others.” — George Orwell

Statistics: Posted by anita — Wed Apr 26, 2017 10:19 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 26, 2017 anita 0

My tick population has increased since I’ve had to keep my chickens in the run, due to the local hawks that are illegal to do anything to. (I do mean local.)

“All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others.” — George Orwell

Statistics: Posted by anita — Wed Apr 26, 2017 10:19 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 26, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
Stahlrosen wrote:
That’s interesting. I may have to try that in spots.

Have you tried Guineas? They work too. Unless you are like my neighbor who has a resident Eagle and finds them a tasty meal :blink: I told her at least they are going for a good cause!

Guinea fowl are fantastic tick eaters. I don’t have ticks anymore. I trained them to roost at night in the coop with my hens. I don’t lose any to night predators. I have eagles and hawks, but the guineas are savvy about warning each other.
Reb

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Wed Apr 26, 2017 10:09 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 26, 2017 Stahlrosen 0

That’s interesting. I may have to try that in spots.

Have you tried Guineas? They work too. Unless you are like my neighbor who has a resident Eagle and finds them a tasty meal :blink: I told her at least they are going for a good cause!

Statistics: Posted by Stahlrosen — Wed Apr 26, 2017 9:44 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Tick Tubes

April 26, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0

WELL, HOLY CR@P!!!

I don’t care if it works….I’m going into business for myself!!!!

A $2 item selling for over $80 on amazon with a 4 star rating!!!???!?!…..WoW! lol,,,Must work pretty damn good I’d say…

There’s one born every minute folks…Yersiree.

https://www.amazon.com/Damminix-27203-Tick-Tube-24-Pack/dp/B000OWB7ME

Give me a few days to get setup and I’ll save you $5 off the above listing.. a “Special price” ..lol.

Image

Dunno for myself Outback but if folks are buying them at this price and rating them that high I’d say they’re certainly be worth the try on the homemade versions…….or you could buy them from me when I win the new buy-box in about a week on amazon….lol.

.

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Wed Apr 26, 2017 9:04 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Tick Tubes

April 26, 2017 theoutback 0

If your place is anything like mine, you are infested w/ ticks. This makes a lot of sense to me. The key to pest control is breaking the life cycle, this shows that they are trying to do this, not just simple put a bandaid on the aftermath. I deal in pest control quite extensively in my orchards and I can tell you, breaking the lifecycle is how you bring pest levels down. In theory this seems to have merit. I’m going to give it a try.

Has anyone tried this?

https://www.homesteadnotes.com/make-tic … rid-ticks/

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Wed Apr 26, 2017 4:23 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Agrihoods/Agriburbia

April 9, 2017 Blondie 0

In the suburb of 40,000 that I used to live in a developer bought up land behind a shopping center to build a walkable community.

The quaint idea of walking to the grocery, Starbucks, etc. Keeping green and all that. The homes were so pricey that it took 2 incomes and no woman working 40+ hrs a week and 3 littles ones is going to walk to the grocery to lug home 12 bags on Saturday. That said, can they come home to plant, weed, take care of aimals, tend bees, etc?

My kids while out on their own can land back with me at any time so I keep that in mind.

ITA, not much on the market here, either. I decided to buy a parcel and build something modest. In over my head, for sure but why not?

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sun Apr 09, 2017 6:17 pm


General Homesteading Topics • Re: Agrihoods/Agriburbia

April 9, 2017 Blondie 0

In the suburb of 40,000 that I used to live in a developer bought up land behind a shopping center to build a walkable community.

The quaint idea of walking to the grocery, Starbucks, etc. Keeping green and all that. The homes were so pricey that it took 2 incomes and no woman working 40+ hrs a week and 3 littles ones is going to walk to the grocery to lug home 12 bags on Saturday. That said, can they come home to plant, weed, take care of aimals, tend bees, etc?

My kids while out on their own can land back with me at any time so I keep that in mind.

ITA, not much on the market here, either. I decided to buy a parcel and build something modest. In over my head, for sure but why not?

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sun Apr 09, 2017 6:17 pm


General Homesteading Topics • Re: Agrihoods/Agriburbia

April 9, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

just another variation of the self sustaining community with an emphasis on gardening and agriculture …. I’d want the whole package of self sufficiency – there’s just some common sense crosslinking that shouldn’t be ignored just because it doesn’t fit the rigid marketing parameters ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Sun Apr 09, 2017 2:52 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Agrihoods/Agriburbia

April 9, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

just another variation of the self sustaining community with an emphasis on gardening and agriculture …. I’d want the whole package of self sufficiency – there’s just some common sense crosslinking that shouldn’t be ignored just because it doesn’t fit the rigid marketing parameters ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Sun Apr 09, 2017 2:52 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Agrihoods/Agriburbia

April 9, 2017 anita 0

Okay,

I just discovered this and maybe I’m late to the party. This seems to be a “new” iteration (there have been a couple around since the late 90s) of a planned community. Rather than have a golf course, they have a community farm, walking trails, etc.

It’s still a planned community with an HOA, but the one I have looked into permits/encourages backyard gardens, chickens, and bees. It has an onsite farm that basically grows greens/vegetables/some fruit that you can participate in through a CSA, as well as growing for local restaurants etc.

I haven’t heard of this before, and I’m thinking about moving to something like that if I can find one that suits. Many on here know that my husband died two years ago, and my youngest is off to college this fall and the older two are out on their own. I want to downsize, and in the last year+ of looking, I’ve seen nothing, or almost nothing, in my area that suits me. I don’t want to be in town, but I don’t want to be out in the middle of nowhere where there are few people around, I know no one, etc. As a lone woman, I really like the idea of being in a neighborhood with like-minded (from the gardening/slight self-sufficiency basis) people. I do worry that there might be a bunch of old hippies (or young hippies.)

I used to sell real estate and well understand the downsides of an HOA, but since this expressly permits the things i’m interested in, I’m hoping it won’t be too restrictive. I have just started to investigate, but wondered if anyone else has heard of something like this or has considered something similar. I’m looking in the Va./NC area. I live in PA now, and haven’t seen anything like this here.

Here’s a link to an article that mentions a few. http://www.shareable.net/blog/12-agriho … mainstream

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Apr 09, 2017 2:25 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Birch syrup

March 2, 2017 tamtbell 0

Hey all,
I can’t recall if I can or cannot do this but I have a blog up about making your own birch syrup out of your own tapped birch trees.
http://tamsgarden-howdoesourgardengrow.blogspot.com/2017/03/foraging-from-nature-birch-syrup.html#.WLheyPnL9SM

We’re trying something new this year! We’re starting to slowly pull more and more off the grid, off the food supply, stay local.
We now produce our own meat, fruits, veggies, honey, BIRCH syrup, and so on.

Statistics: Posted by tamtbell — Thu Mar 02, 2017 1:10 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Storeing Oil / Lard

February 26, 2017 Murby 0
jean11 wrote:
I’ve been saving my bacon grease in the refrig until I have enough to pressure can a number of pints. My first batch of bacon grease I filled to within 1 inch of the top of the pint jar – and I learned that was a mistake. The boiling grease splattered the rim of the pint jar during processing, and those jars did not seal. I now fill the jars 2 to 2 1/2 inches from the top and no longer have the problem. My next canning project is to can 8 pounds of butter. I canned butter one other time and the processing turned out fine. I learned a lesson here as well. The butter I bought was salted, and the end product was enough to make my hair stand up. This time I’m doing a mix of salted and unsalted which is what the recipe suggested in the first place.

The reason your grease boiled and splattered is the same reason your canned grease is probably going to go bad… Water!!

I would also comment that storing grease with meat in a fridge for more than a week will probably result in a spoiled product.

But I’m no expert..

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Sat Feb 25, 2017 8:44 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Storeing Oil / Lard

February 24, 2017 jean11 0

I’ve been saving my bacon grease in the refrig until I have enough to pressure can a number of pints. My first batch of bacon grease I filled to within 1 inch of the top of the pint jar – and I learned that was a mistake. The boiling grease splattered the rim of the pint jar during processing, and those jars did not seal. I now fill the jars 2 to 2 1/2 inches from the top and no longer have the problem. My next canning project is to can 8 pounds of butter. I canned butter one other time and the processing turned out fine. I learned a lesson here as well. The butter I bought was salted, and the end product was enough to make my hair stand up. This time I’m doing a mix of salted and unsalted which is what the recipe suggested in the first place.

Statistics: Posted by jean11 — Fri Feb 24, 2017 12:55 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Off Grid Living

January 15, 2017 Cin 0

Reading is cool – hit the yard sales and start picking up books. One summer, we said the B-word, and my Dad challenged us to read the entire Encyclopedia set we had. 2 of us 7 kids finished A-Z before school started again in the fall. The others took longer.

The Girl Scout HandBook has a whole section on indoor and outdoor games that are free and fun to play.

Depending on their age, pretending to be Mommy always fun – with their own little sink an stove, play food, etc. (Boys like it as much as girls, BTW).

We spent hours in the dirt with Tonka trucks, especially the ones with the shovels…skip loader? And the dump truck. Moving parts are fun. We made roads in the dirt, lined with rocks and would earth move all day.

I grew up in the Mojave Desert of SC – we spent hours running all over the desert, catching lizards and horned toads, the occasional scorpion (none of us ever got stung…), and once in a while, a ground squirrel (Mom never let us keep them). We made swords and weapons out of sticks, and would hollow out the larger mesquite bushes and play.

When we went on “adventures” planning to be out all day…we’d fill the canteens, and pack a bag lunch. The dump was a mile away, and back before waste management, we were allowed in, if we asked politely, to go through scrap piles for treasures. We’d get home before the heat of the day, usually around 1-2 PM.

We also had a pool, but we weren’t allowed in it without adult supervision upon pain of death (seriously). This is IMPORTANT – if you have a large pool and it’s not heated, do not allow anyone to swim during the heat of the day. If there is a 30 degree difference between outside air and the water, especially children are prone to hypothermia.

However, many a summer evening – my Dad would make a pot of chili and cornbread, we’d play in the pool for hours in the evening, get out, eat some chili, and then go to bed to sleep soundly.

If you don’t want to spend a lot on a pool and you want it to last – buy an 8 foot round, 2 foot high stock tank (ours was $100 8 years ago). Then buy a propane, tankless hot water heater that hooks up to a hose. Run the regular waterhose until the stock tank is about 18 inches deep, then run the rest of the water through the hot water heater.

Advantages – fun size pool for average kids. Disadvantages – even with a cover, the pool got dirty fast, we emptied it about every 3-4 days – but then again, some 10 or so people were using it. The garden was well watered, though. :)

Oh, and the kids next door built an underground fort (that neither their parents or ours knew about). They dug a couple deep holes, with a tunnel, propped scrap plywood and 2 X 4s as a roof, covered it in dirt, and we’d crawl in there with flashlights and play Army men. It eventually collapsed, and a few months later, the Dad found it and had a freak-out…

When I think of all the stuff we did when I was a kid, it’s wonder we all survived to adulthood. The times I’m talking about – youngest kid was 5, oldest was 11 and we did all this running around the desert for a good 5 years. As all of us hit our teens, we didn’t do it any more.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Sat Jan 14, 2017 9:08 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Off Grid Living

January 14, 2017 kenjabroni 0

if they are old enough give them marbles and jacks. those can be hour killers. I loved playing both when I had the opportunity. Chinese checkers, Uno, Skip-Bo were some other games I really enjoyed. If it was nice outside though I was out running around doing stuff. If you have any sort of livestock or anything involve them with that. I ask my kids if they like our chickens and they tell me they wish theyd of had them when they were little.

Statistics: Posted by kenjabroni — Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:44 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Off Grid Living

January 14, 2017 Mountain mama 0

When ever my kids said they were bored growing up, I would make them take the wheel Barrow and manure rake and pick up horse poop out of the field for the garden. Whenever their friends would come over, none of them ever said they were bored either! Kids will always find things to do and make toys out of anything. Mine used to love to make forts out of boxes and sheets. The bunk bed was a covered wagon with a couple of stick horses tucked into the front. Little House on the Prairie was a big hit.

Statistics: Posted by Mountain mama — Sat Jan 14, 2017 12:31 pm