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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 17, 2018 SF Trooper 0

Great comments! I asked about this here in this forum because I was wondering if committed preppers would be more, less, or have about the same level of interest in getting involved in this kind of arrangement as non-preppers. What I’m learning is tha…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 14, 2018 anita 0

Since I moved last fall, I’m probably going to participate in a CSA this year, while I get my garden set up, as I think it will be too late for me to plant much but a fall crop by the time I get the raised beds in, soil in, fence around, and so forth….

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 NJMike 0

In NJ, the CSA model seems to be more common for farms, and often around the areas where affluent suburbanites can pay into a farming operation for a share of the harvest. This has been picking up popularity in recent years with more and more people i…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 NJMike 0

In NJ, the CSA model seems to be more common for farms, and often around the areas where affluent suburbanites can pay into a farming operation for a share of the harvest. This has been picking up popularity in recent years with more and more people i…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 oldasrocks 0

The main problem I see is if SHTF they would show up with their 42 friends.We’ve let a few people pick some of our extra veggies and berries. They do some much damage to the plants and land we had to quit being nice guys. Sure they appreciate planing…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 oldasrocks 0

The main problem I see is if SHTF they would show up with their 42 friends.We’ve let a few people pick some of our extra veggies and berries. They do some much damage to the plants and land we had to quit being nice guys. Sure they appreciate planing…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 sageprice 0

Once again the two sides argue the same truths from a different angle. Any non-serious and clumsy clod can destroy a farm but serious conscientious farm hand is a valuable person to know. Some one you trained, who is willing to lend a hand when SHTF….

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 sageprice 0

Once again the two sides argue the same truths from a different angle. Any non-serious and clumsy clod can destroy a farm but serious conscientious farm hand is a valuable person to know. Some one you trained, who is willing to lend a hand when SHTF….

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 13, 2018 John Galt 1 0

Hardship feelings will develop,,, and that’s assuming they the city slicker doesn’t tear out the corner of your barn with the scrape blade. Seen that and worse before. Even worse with a set of forks on the front of the tractor.I still cringe wh…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 12, 2018 ForwardPreppers 0

This sounds very good in theory, however, I don’t know that it is doable. People’s values are so different these days. Somehow it would be turned around on you.We once were in a group where one person owned the property and the others were going to …

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Co-op Farming

January 12, 2018 SF Trooper 0

Hi, Ilini Warrior!Thanks for the input. Probably very true in most locations! A great point to consider.Luckily, here in Tennessee, we have the Tennessee Agritourism Liability Act and several others that protect farmers and ranchers. It allows people …

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General Homesteading Topics • Co-op Farming

January 12, 2018 SF Trooper 0

Hello, all!I’ve been thinking about something lately that seems common-sense to me, but would appreciate your comments. Some of us, my family included, live rurally and either farm or homestead. There are, however, many preppers who live in urban or s…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Weather stations

December 24, 2017 arkieready 0

I had a weather station. The indoor unit and outdoor unit were placed about 50 feet apart. The indoor info quit working within 2 years and I couldn’t set the time ever. The outdoor part was decent until the humidity part quit a year later. the tem…

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Storeing Oil / Lard

September 30, 2017 farmer_dude48 0

I have a question about storing Lard. I bought a different brand of lard and I noticed on the label it said Hydrogenated Lard and it also has a use by date. The other brand of Lard we use doesn’t have either. Can somebody tell me what the difference would ? :?

Thanks

Statistics: Posted by farmer_dude48 — Sat Sep 30, 2017 10:50 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 27, 2017 IceFire 0
Photon Guy wrote:
I see. Well IceFire talked about carrying a handgun when out in the yard for use against dangerous critters and that does make sense. I was just wondering the effectiveness of a fence and if there is any sort of fence that is good at keeping all dangerous animals out.

Fences are better for keeping domestic animals I (with limited effectiveness, depending on the animal) than for keeping dangerous critters out. Most of the dangerous ones will fid a way over, under, or through a fence given proper motivation. Snakes can (and DO) tunnel, so they’ll go under, or if the fence is not solid, they’ll go through the gaps in the fence. Large cats (mountain lions, jaguars–we DO have them in some areas of the country, lynx, bobcats, etc.) will jump OVER the fence. Depending on fence height, coyotes will go over or under. Bears will just smash THROUGH a fence. Still, while it won’t STOP them if they are determined, it probably WILL slow them down, at least a little, and is better than no fence at all.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:15 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 26, 2017 Cast Iron 0

A few strands of electric fencing with a 1J energizer will do for most animals.
For the smaller coons and what not, just a few more stands at the lower levels.
Not sure about snakes.

The two black bears I have ran into on my property, they were more afraid of me than I of them.
Then again, us humans are somewhat odorous. I would run too.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:23 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 26, 2017 jimLE 0

i’m thinking that the proper fence “might ” work.but yet,even then.only up to a certain point..in which your on your own after that..i carry a 9 round 22 revolver when at home.it’s great for what wild life that i deal with here..we don’t have big cats,like cougars panthers or whatever here.nor do we have bears..we do have a long tail cat of some kind here.i believe it’s half the size or smaller than a cougar.the rest of the 4 legged animals are raccoon opossum,armadillo and coyote..

Statistics: Posted by jimLE — Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:45 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 25, 2017 oldasrocks 0

No fence is going to keep out Squirrels, birds, mice, rats or snakes or moles and chipmunks which dig under. Much less Asian beetles which do more damage than animals.
I’m studying the cost of a hoop house covered with 1/8″ holed hail screen to keep out the beetles. The ate everything this year.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:23 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 25, 2017 oldasrocks 0

No fence is going to keep out Squirrels, birds, mice, rats or snakes or moles and chipmunks which dig under. Much less Asian beetles which do more damage than animals.
I’m studying the cost of a hoop house covered with 1/8″ holed hail screen to keep out the beetles. The ate everything this year.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:23 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 25, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Depends on what kind of fence you build. I have a 6′ high “no climb” wire fence around my garden and orchard that keeps the deer and elk out but a rattle snake can slither right through it. I have plenty of snakes and lizards in that garden but no rattler’s so far. Witnessed a half grown skunk wiggle his way through the wires but skunks don’t eat fruit or veggies, they dig up grubs and yellow jacket nests, so this is beneficial. Have seen coyote and fox run around the outside of the fence, then leave. Raccoon’s will dig under or climb over any fence. If a bear wants in no fence will stop him, they just tear it down or climb over it. Without a fence the critters will eat everything I grow.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:42 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Mother Earth News Fair in Seven Springs PA 15-17

September 10, 2017 Photon Guy 0

In Seven Springs PA on 15-17 there is going to be the Mother Earth News Fair. I hope to be there. They’ve got over 150 workshops that teach all sorts of stuff about homesteading and survival. Everything from bee keeping, gardening of all sorts, soap making, solar power, you name it and its most likely covered in a workshop. Here is the website.

https://www.motherearthnewsfair.com

Statistics: Posted by Photon Guy — Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:01 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Looking for Info on Butter Churns

August 16, 2017 Anna 0

I bought a used separator when we had goats, but it did not work. I was never able to make butter from goats milk.

Cows milk is simple, let set in fridge overnight and then skim cream off in the morning.

I used to give my ds the churn and tell him he had to churn the butter while he watched TV. He was a TV addict and I wouldn’t let him watch unless he turned the churn. I would start the butter in the blender and then move to the churn to finish so it didn’t take long.

Statistics: Posted by Anna — Wed Aug 16, 2017 2:02 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Looking for Info on Butter Churns

August 16, 2017 Anna 0

I bought a used separator when we had goats, but it did not work. I was never able to make butter from goats milk.

Cows milk is simple, let set in fridge overnight and then skim cream off in the morning.

I used to give my ds the churn and tell him he had to churn the butter while he watched TV. He was a TV addict and I wouldn’t let him watch unless he turned the churn. I would start the butter in the blender and then move to the churn to finish so it didn’t take long.

Statistics: Posted by Anna — Wed Aug 16, 2017 2:02 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Looking for Info on Butter Churns

August 16, 2017 Anna 0

I bought a used separator when we had goats, but it did not work. I was never able to make butter from goats milk.

Cows milk is simple, let set in fridge overnight and then skim cream off in the morning.

I used to give my ds the churn and tell him he had to churn the butter while he watched TV. He was a TV addict and I wouldn’t let him watch unless he turned the churn. I would start the butter in the blender and then move to the churn to finish so it didn’t take long.

Statistics: Posted by Anna — Wed Aug 16, 2017 2:02 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Gunns 0
Permafrost wrote:
I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

I imagine everything outside stays frozen in the winter where you are at.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:46 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Gunns 0
Permafrost wrote:
I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:

I imagine everything outside stays frozen in the winter where you are at.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:46 am


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Type of lime for an outhouse

June 30, 2017 Permafrost 0

I use wood ash. I have considered getting lime but the ash from my wood stove is free and needs to be dumped somewhere. It works somewhat, I guess. I still have a stalagmite/stalactite (whatever) in the outhouse come spring, but nothing works in the winter because everything is froze solid.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:58 pm