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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 29, 2017 kappydell 0

not all yeastie beasties in the air are good for bread. Nor for good tasting fermentation. I consider it worth the expense to purchase the first time starter, then keep it going, that way I know what I will get and that it will taste decent.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Mar 29, 2017 2:37 pm


General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 29, 2017 kappydell 0

not all yeastie beasties in the air are good for bread. Nor for good tasting fermentation. I consider it worth the expense to purchase the first time starter, then keep it going, that way I know what I will get and that it will taste decent.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Mar 29, 2017 2:37 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 21, 2017 Cast Iron 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
Great, interesting stuff here all….. Unfortunately for me, its all French(Bread)…lol.

As an ABSOLUTE newbie to this, where would you recommend I get some good info starting my bread skills?

I of course found some resources already but am curious to veteran recommended links….

This is my current prepper goal…. Bread…. In its entirety – including easy starts thru grinding my own wheat.

Thank you guys for any quick links in advance….

Good joke.

I have had several books prior to this one, but this one really brought it home for me: https://www.amazon.com/Bread-Bakers-App … apprentice

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Mar 21, 2017 3:42 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 21, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0

Great, interesting stuff here all….. Unfortunately for me, its all French(Bread)…lol.

As an ABSOLUTE newbie to this, where would you recommend I get so good info starting my bread skills?

I of course found some resources already by are curious to veteran recommended links…. This is my current prepper goal…. Bread…. In its entirety including easy starts thru grinding my own wheat.

Thank you guys for any quick links in advance….

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Tue Mar 21, 2017 1:38 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Dehydrated Apple Sauce-Purchasing #10 Cans

March 21, 2017 LetsPrep11 0

The Emergency Essentials Applesauce is on sale ($20.52) right now through Walmart.com. Shipping on orders over $35 is Free. You do have to add sugar to this applesauce to make it taste like what we’re used to.

We also threw out dozens of 1/2 used jars of applesauce that got lost in the fridge. We switched to buying cases of the little cups and never have any waste. Haven’t had a problem keeping them rotated as the shelf life is pretty long.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Emergency-Essentials-Applesauce-Mix-30-oz/46772414#about-item

Statistics: Posted by LetsPrep11 — Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:27 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 21, 2017 watcher 0

The bread we made for St. Pats day was a variation of Jas Townsend multigrain bread with barm – https://youtu.be/0dtBjqIu5W8 – with two substitutions. The first was to use whole grain spelt flour in place of the whole grain wheat and the barley flour (the DS tries to avoid wheat flours). The second was to replace the water with more beer (the beer we used was a rye stout). The bread was excellent. Ate up some more of it today as reuben sandwiches.

Statistics: Posted by watcher — Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:06 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 20, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Drakenstead1 wrote:
Interesting responses to my post. At least a few of us are interested in good taste. I figure that making good bread with a renewable starter is not only a survival skill from the point of self reliance and sustainability but from the stand point of taste. One of the dangers of living off basic food stuffs, particularly LTS food is what I call “palate death”. I lived for a time in East Africa and witnessed famine first hand in the Karamoja district. I have seen people die in the abundance of food when it either is repetitive and bland or totally unfamiliar or alien to their culture. Staying alive and prosperous is not only about quantity but about taste as well.

The first loaf we made from this starter was just short of magnificent. It was on a par with the best old world European bread of my experience. I suspect that living in a farm house that is well over a century old has something to do with the variety and vigor of the yeast beasties and lactobacilli we caught. I’m fairly certain that it is also a matter of luck. I’d suggest that it takes several tries to get a good culture and that one should not be discouraged by failure. Failure is an integral part of the learning process. It seems to me to be a good idea to perfect this skill prior to an “event” rather than learn on the fly. Secondly I can say that life is too short to drink suboptimal beer or to eat lousy bread. I believe that beer and bread are absolute proof that G-d wishes us to be happy (In which I paraphrase the eminent Mr. Benjamin Franklin). There is also the consideration that not all strains of yeast are perfect for all kinds of flour. A culture that works with whole grains, wheat or others may be foul with a white all purpose flour. It also can work the other way as a culture suitable for that white flour may leave an attempted whole grain rye loaf suitable only as a boat anchor. As my Late Father advised me on my wedding night “keep trying until you get it right”.

Well said.

One reason why I think after a prolong period of time eating canned goods or MREs, some will be quite willing to trade things they normally would never consider for, say, fresh eggs.
E.g. see my The Fall, in prepper fiction. Bold, mine for emphasis.

I made some bread with some dough I made last week.
Imparted some very interesting flavors, reminded me of French bread, the crust was exceptionally crusty.
I made a starter today, using a Black&Tan beer. See what that tastes like in a week or so.

I have noted, when making pizza dough, using milk rather than water makes for a more tender crust.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:31 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 20, 2017 Drakenstead1 0

Interesting responses to my post. At least a few of us are interested in good taste. I figure that making good bread with a renewable starter is not only a survival skill from the point of self reliance and sustainability but from the stand point of taste. One of the dangers of living off basic food stuffs, particularly LTS food is what I call “palate death”. I lived for a time in East Africa and witnessed famine first hand in the Karamoja district. I have seen people die in the abundance of food when it either is repetitive and bland or totally unfamiliar or alien to their culture. Staying alive and prosperous is not only about quantity but about taste as well.

The first loaf we made from this starter was just short of magnificent. It was on a par with the best old world European bread of my experience. I suspect that living in a farm house that is well over a century old has something to do with the variety and vigor of the yeast beasties and lactobacilli we caught. I’m fairly certain that it is also a matter of luck. I’d suggest that it takes several tries to get a good culture and that one should not be discouraged by failure. Failure is an integral part of the learning process. It seems to me to be a good idea to perfect this skill prior to an “event” rather than learn on the fly. Secondly I can say that life is too short to drink suboptimal beer or to eat lousy bread. I believe that beer and bread are absolute proof that G-d wishes us to be happy (In which I paraphrase the eminent Mr. Benjamin Franklin). There is also the consideration that not all strains of yeast are perfect for all kinds of flour. A culture that works with whole grains, wheat or others may be foul with a white all purpose flour. It also can work the other way as a culture suitable for that white flour may leave an attempted whole grain rye loaf suitable only as a boat anchor. As my Late Father advised me on my wedding night “keep trying until you get it right”.

Statistics: Posted by Drakenstead1 — Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:18 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Dehydrated Apple Sauce-Purchasing #10 Cans

March 20, 2017 watcher 0

I have. Dehydrated it in a Nesco dehydrator on fruit roll up trays. Dried it down to brittle. Used it on camping trips to add to oatmeal for breakfasts. Works great along with a little sugar and cinnamon. Also have made peach sauce for same reason and same way. A little sugar and non-dairy creamer into the oatmeal is good for that. If you don’t mind pink oatmeal same with strawberry sauce

Statistics: Posted by watcher — Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:07 am


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General Food Topics • Dehydrated Apple Sauce-Purchasing #10 Cans

March 20, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Has anyone tried dehydrated apple sauce from any of the prep-food vendors? I just threw out about 10 jars of apple sauce that was a number of years old. We didn’t use it fast enough (as the kids grew older) and it turned brown in the jars! I’m replacing it all with dehydrated or freeze dried. Live & learn, as you prep. :(

I found this sale going on, right now. https://www.thereadystore.com/saratoga- … pple-sauce -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Sun Mar 19, 2017 10:48 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 19, 2017 arkieready 0

@watcher: I love jas. Townsend’ videos. There is quite a bit there we can glean.

My last sourdough starter flopped. I didn’t really use barm–my buddy gave me ale dregs, not the same. Not very flavorful, not much loft.
@cin: too cool has never been a problem for me, just slows it. But too warm and it turns “interesting” colors.

Statistics: Posted by arkieready — Sun Mar 19, 2017 4:45 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Sour Dough Starter

March 19, 2017 Cin 0

I made a decent sourdough that lasted about 5 years. You have to make sure to keep it warm, even by an open window on a cool night can kill it.

2 cups of water, 2 cups of flour. Left in a warm spot, sponge developed a couple hours later. I’d feed it every 3 days, scoop of flour, about a cup of water. You can add yeast, but if you do, add a spoonful of sugar, helps it grow.

I used it to make pizza dough and bread. Pretty tasty.

When it died, I never re-started it, got sidetracked and stopped making my own dough. I plan to restart it in a few days when it warms up more.

BTW, I put it by a closed window, and it got sunlight every morning for a few hours.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Sat Mar 18, 2017 8:15 pm


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General Food Topics • Sour Dough Starter

March 18, 2017 Drakenstead1 0

We finally got tired of failed sour dough attempts using boughten starters or recipes that are confusing and so varied as to be useless. We’ve kept some going well for a couple of years but eventually even if we follow the suggestions we find for renewal they tend to die off or start producing what looks like a swamp of weird growing things. There’s also the problem we had of a starter that works well with whole grains and flour made from rye, buckwheat or things like oats. What ever we used never seemed to give the bread the lift we wanted. Getting a real sour taste also has eluded us. So we gave up and tossed the rule book.

We put two cups of whole rye flour in a bowl and added two cups of luke warm water from our tap. Hard water seems to run contrary to a good culture so we used softened water from the appropriate tap. We left it in the summer kitchen for a week after which we were rewarded with a bubbling mass of beautiful sour smelling culture. I set aside a cup of it and added a cup of all purpose wheat flour and a cup of water to save for further use. I’ll add a cup of each today and keep stirring once a day for the next week then let it go dormant in a pint jar in the fridge or use it again, saving yet another bit for more use.
Going on instinct, we added two more cups of whole rye flour and one and three quarter cup of water. We lightly dusted the top with a bit more rye flour and covered the bowl with a cloth setting it back in the summer kitchen to work it’s magic. This morning we added a teaspoon of salt, two table spoons of oil and eight tablespoons of wheat gluten. We then stirred in two cups each of whole rye, whole wheat bread flour and white wheat bread flour. A vigorous session of kneading followed and we separated it into two loaves, formed them and put them in two oiled bread pans. We let them rise for a full four hours, cut a split in the tops, painted them with a bit of milk and a sprinkle of poppy seed. Fifteen minutes in the oven at 400 degrees with another hour at 360. We cooled them on racks and rushed to try as soon as possible to do so. The results are heavenly.

The problems we’ve had are as mentioned, hard water, with locking into a time for the sponge to work or the dough to rise. We’ve found that each flour or combination, each yeast and the temperature and humidity need to be taken into account. We can’t go by a recipe that says something needs to “rise for two hours”. This culture only needs one rise not the two that conventional yeast requires. Basically we needed to bake a lot of half good loaves to get to the place where we could use our experience and instincts to produce good bread. We needed the confidence to decide what to do based on what we know, what the various ingredients(especially the yeast) and the environment dictated.

Now if we can keep the yeast beasties alive were on the road to the real staff of life with no more flour and water paste eh.

Statistics: Posted by Drakenstead1 — Sat Mar 18, 2017 1:05 pm


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General Food Topics • Patriot Pantry deals on woot dot com

March 4, 2017 allen123 0

http://sport.woot.com/plus/emergency-fr … p_cnt_wp_2

1 week: $29.99
Heartland’s Best Mashed Potatoes (8 Servings)
Maple Grove Oatmeal (8 Servings)
Granny’s Homestyle Potato Soup (4 Servings)
Traveler’s Stew (4 Servings)
Blue Ribbon Creamy Chicken Rice (4 Servings)
Country Cottage Mac & Cheese (4 Servings)
Honey Coated Banana Chips (8 Servings)

4 week: $139.99
(16) Maple Grove Oatmeal
(10) Instant White Rice
(8) Heartland’s Best Mashed Potatoes
(8) Granny’s Homestyle Potato Soup
(8) Blue Ribbon Creamy Chicken Rice
(8) Traveler’s Stew
(8) Cheesy Broccoli & Rice Soup
(8) Country Cottage Mac & Cheese
(8) Honey Coated Banana Chips
(10) Chocolate Pudding
(8) Orange Energy Drink Mix
(16) Settler’s Whey Powdered Milk
(12) Buttermilk Pancake Mix
(8) Southwest Savory Rice
(4) Liberty Bell Potato Cheddar Soup

3 month: $349.99
(8) Strawberry Fields Cream of Wheat
(56) Maple Grove Oatmeal
(24) Granny’s Homestyle Potato Soup
(16) Traveler’s Stew
(20) Blue Ribbon Creamy Chicken Rice
(8) Liberty Bell Potato Cheddar Potato Soup
(16) Traditional Fettuccine Alfredo
(8) Cheesy Broccoli & Rice Soup
(24) Country Cottage Mac & Cheese
(32) Heartland’s Best Mashed Potatoes
(12) Creamy Stroganoff
(20) Instant White Rice
(30) Chocolate Pudding
(16) Honey Coated Banana Chips
(32) Orange Energy Drink Mix
(48) Settler’s Whey Powdered Milk
(8) Potatoes O’Brien
(8) Rancher’s Black Beans and Rice
(16) Pioneer’s Chili Mac
(24) Buttermilk Pancakes
(24) Southwest Savory Rice

Hope this sort of post is not against the terms here. Hope y’all are well and thought i’d pass this along in case anyone is looking to shore up reserves. I have no affiliation other than a passing interest in looking for deals online.

Allen123

Statistics: Posted by allen123 — Sat Mar 04, 2017 11:55 am


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General Food Topics • Quinoa prices slowly coming down

March 2, 2017 broden 0

seems more and more must be becoming available to market which makes sense

every year at tax refund time we order 50 pounds of red quinoa from ifsbulk

last year it was 150 something dollars (including shipping)

this year it was 130 something dollars (including shipping)

we vac seal it in a brown paper bag inside the vac bag 5 pounds per

eating 3 year old quinoa now .. not a problem so far

Statistics: Posted by broden — Thu Mar 02, 2017 3:11 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: PREP TEST: DAIRY & Eggs-Freeze Dried & Dehydrated Produc

March 2, 2017 Murby 0

Wow.. this thread was SOOOOO unexpected.

I absolutely love eggs.. we have (had) chickens I would eat 30 eggs per week in all forums from sunny-side-up to scrambled to french toast.. Next to Alaskan King Crab, eggs are one of my favorite foods.

So a while back, I did some engineering work for a factory that just happens to produce… wait for it! Powdered eggs! So I called up the plant manager and asked him if he could send me a box of them.. We didn’t discuss much.. I’m thinking I’m going to get a plastic bag in a shoe box full of egg powder right? Wrong! A week later, a 30ft box truck pulls up to my house with one of those lift gates.. The guy rolls off a pallet filled with 16 inch square boxes and I’m like “umm.. think you have the wrong address buddy”.. Nope.. turns out the plant manager sent me 500 lbs worth of powdered eggs. (they must have been real happy with the work I did for them! LOL)

So anyhow.. I tried them and I loved them! But one thing I did learn is that you have to mix them with water correctly… You can’t just “eyeball it”.. its not hot chocolate.. not enough water and they taste to thick like cardboard… too much water and they don’t reconstitute correctly.. But when we followed the directions, I couldn’t really tell the difference between fresh eggs and powdered eggs.

Not sure what the problem with your eggs is but mine are fine..

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Thu Mar 02, 2017 10:54 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Store Canned Chicken Breast.

February 26, 2017 IceFire 0

While Kirkland is a good brand (I buy quite a bit of it myself, the problem with the commercially canned chicken is that it is from factory-farmed chicken, which is why it is so bland. After having both the commercially raised chicken and chicken that I have raised myself, I can say that the chicken I have raised myself is MUCH more flavorful (More tender, too, and that was WITHOUT the added “up to 15% broth solution” that the processors add to bump up the weight.)

Home-raised and commercially raised chickens (turkeys too) are MILES apart in flavor. Mine get grass/weeds, fruit and veggie scraps, and bugs (not to mention the occasional mouse or lizard they catch) in addition to a high-quality, natural feed with NO hormones or antibiotics. Plus, they have plenty of fresh air and sunshine. Commercially raised birds get the cheapest “vegetarian” feed the producers can get away with, that usually has growth hormones and antibiotics (to try to keep them semi-healthy in their overcrowded conditions) added, and they live with thousands of others in overcrowded “chicken houses” with artificial light. It’s no wonder they taste bland.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sat Feb 25, 2017 7:34 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Store Canned Chicken Breast.

February 26, 2017 JayJay 0

Use in a casserole..make homemade chicken noodle soup..make homemade chicken dumplings.
I tried frozen dumplings last week and my chicken dumplings were great..maybe it was my chicken broth, but I bought more to test.

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Sat Feb 25, 2017 7:27 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Store Canned Chicken Breast.

February 25, 2017 Blondie 0

If you want tacos, buy some Taco Bell taco seasoning packets.

I found them on sale for 50 cents. They pack a lot of flavor. You can make a marinade from the meat, packing liquid and the spice packet. Let it sit in the fridge for 30 minutes.

Check the sodium if you’re watching salt.

Statistics: Posted by Blondie — Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:47 pm


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General Food Topics • Store Canned Chicken Breast.

February 25, 2017 donba 0

The DW ( aka She Whoo Must be Obeyed ) Bought premium chunk Chicken Breast, in a can. 7 oz packed in water.The brand is Kirkland, most of there stuff is pretty good. This was very bland, and had almost no flavor at all. She mixed it up like you would do tuna salad, a sort of chicken salad. She added green onions and It still was very bland, almost no flavor at all. Was thinking of adding taco souse for chicken tacos …..

Statistics: Posted by donba — Sat Feb 25, 2017 5:59 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 22, 2017 kappydell 0

a pound of grain a day is a common figure; just remember that does not mean a pound of wheat berries, necessarily…..grains are extremely varied , such as rice, barley, flours, pasta (noodles, macaroni, ramen), oatmeal, popcorn, and cornmeal. That would make it easy to go thru a pound per person. That only seems like a lot, until you break it down.
So don’t be too quick to dismiss it- because it takes about 8 oz flour to make 1 lb bread….3 1/2 c cooked elbow macaroni is 8 oz uncooked…and 1 cup uncooked rice makes 3 cups but weighs 7 oz. You will be hungry and probably doing much more physically than usual so you will need those calories. If I’m eating strictly out of storage I can do a pound of grain easily, along with those ounces of legumes. I plan on NOT getting outside food sources (game, fish, etc) as a conservative plan which makes a pound of grain pretty sparse in my opinion. Any outside food sources will be used as available and as I can get them, but I am not betting my survival on them.

Hope this helps clarify things…

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:17 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 18, 2017 Murby 0
RockinB wrote:
We used this calculator as a guide too. Our family numbers are a lot higher and we are very close on the quantities in the main “shtf” category’s that matter to us.
We’re finished prepping “shtf” food storage and have no intentions of ever using it. Peace of mind without maintaining a rigorous rotation schedule works best for us.

Well that’s certainly one way of doing it.. I plan on doing the same with our wheat berries.. Not really interested in wasting my time grinding them up so hopefully they turn out to be a waste of money.

But our canned soups are delicious.. better than anything that comes out of a cambells soup can.. I eat our canned foods all the time and I don’t do it reluctantly.. After working outside in the cold weather, its nice to be able to pop a quart jar of soup into the microwave and have it ready in 4 minutes.

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Sat Feb 18, 2017 10:14 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 18, 2017 RockinB 0

We used this calculator as a guide too. Our family numbers are a lot higher and we are very close on the quantities in the main “shtf” category’s that matter to us.
We’re finished prepping “shtf” food storage and have no intentions of ever using it. Peace of mind without maintaining a rigorous rotation schedule works best for us.

Statistics: Posted by RockinB — Sat Feb 18, 2017 5:58 am


General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 18, 2017 Murby 0
donba wrote:
I just use this as a guide. We couldn’t live on this kind of diet so we mix in others, three months of freezes dried. Month of MRE, A few months of store bought food. Mix it all up, a years supply of food. Think how boring just eating any one group of food would be. Take your favorite meal eat nothing else, by the end of a week you will be sick of it.

I get that.. we have a huge variety from home canned meat soups (pork, chicken, venison, beef and even fish!) to home canned pork and beans, over 100 cans of store bought tuna (some in water, some in oil), and a variety of other things.

What I learned from the calculator is that I am still very under-stocked and need to increase our supply.

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Sat Feb 18, 2017 2:34 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 18, 2017 donba 0

I just use this as a guide. We couldn’t live on this kind of diet so we mix in others, three months of freezes dried. Month of MRE, A few months of store bought food. Mix it all up, a years supply of food. Think how boring just eating any one group of food would be. Take your favorite meal eat nothing else, by the end of a week you will be sick of it.

Statistics: Posted by donba — Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:30 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 17, 2017 Gunns 0
Illini Warrior wrote:

Murby wrote:I was checking out the provident living calculator to see what they had to say about food storage..
https://providentliving.com/preparednes … /foodcalc/

Typed in 52 weeks for 3 adults and got some crazy numbers..

Can someone take a look?
1200 lbs grain
180 lbs legumes
90 lbs dairy
180 lbs of sugar :?
18 lbs salt (that one I get)
90 lbs of fats

1200 lbs of grain? WHAT?? That works out to just over a pound of grain per person per day..

???? … 1200lbs = 23lb per week = 7.6lbs per person per week = roughly 1lb per day

That’s about 1,500 calories. Plus sugar is for making it all taste better.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:37 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 17, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
Murby wrote:
I was checking out the provident living calculator to see what they had to say about food storage..
https://providentliving.com/preparednes … /foodcalc/

Typed in 52 weeks for 3 adults and got some crazy numbers..

Can someone take a look?
1200 lbs grain
180 lbs legumes
90 lbs dairy
180 lbs of sugar :?
18 lbs salt (that one I get)
90 lbs of fats

1200 lbs of grain? WHAT?? That works out to just over a pound of grain per person per day..

???? … 1200lbs = 23lb per week = 7.6lbs per person per week = roughly 1lb per day

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:55 am


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General Food Topics • Wacky LDS calculator or am I missing something?

February 17, 2017 Murby 0

I was checking out the provident living calculator to see what they had to say about food storage..
https://providentliving.com/preparednes … /foodcalc/

Typed in 52 weeks for 3 adults and got some crazy numbers..

Can someone take a look?
1200 lbs grain
180 lbs legumes
90 lbs dairy
180 lbs of sugar :?
18 lbs salt (that one I get)
90 lbs of fats

1200 lbs of grain? WHAT?? That works out to just over a pound of grain per person per day..

Statistics: Posted by Murby — Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:22 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Ever eat muskrat

January 29, 2017 mom2grandma 0

yes, my husband was a trapper and trapped them. we also live within 30 miles of a Native American reserve. Muskrat is eaten by the native Americans. To cook we always boiled, removed from bone and recooked with onions and pepper. Now that my husband of 40+ years has passed away I miss the food we lived on, muskrat, beaver, deer, and bear to mention a few. we had a very large garden, made our own butter and grew meat chickens each year. we also had chicken for fresh eggs. I canned, froze and dried food. When we shopped it was a treat.

Statistics: Posted by mom2grandma — Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:37 pm


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General Food Topics • Ever eat muskrat

January 28, 2017 rickdun 0

Has anybody ever eaten muskrat.

Well, I’ve traped about 88 so far this season and the last three I got well, I kept the hind quarters and put them in the crockpot, on high for about 1 hour and then on low for about 4 hours.

They are very lean and a little stringy. Cooked them in BBQ sauce with a few other spices and garlic. They are tasty, something like a lean pork loin. The grandkids loved it. Guess I’ll keep some more after I catch ’em.

Statistics: Posted by rickdun — Sat Jan 28, 2017 4:30 pm