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General Food Topics • Re: Comparing dried food companies

October 21, 2017 Matte 0

I’ve heard a lot of good about Mountain House, and lots of bad about Wise. Never tried either. I can vouch for Honeyville products, we don’t buy a lot of storage food in #10 cans but when we do it’s from them and never been disappointed on the produ…

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General Food Topics • Re: Comparing dried food companies

October 21, 2017 Matte 0

I’ve heard a lot of good about Mountain House, and lots of bad about Wise. Never tried either. I can vouch for Honeyville products, we don’t buy a lot of storage food in #10 cans but when we do it’s from them and never been disappointed on the produ…

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General Food Topics • Re: Comparing dried food companies

October 21, 2017 Matte 0

I’ve heard a lot of good about Mountain House, and lots of bad about Wise. Never tried either. I can vouch for Honeyville products, we don’t buy a lot of storage food in #10 cans but when we do it’s from them and never been disappointed on the produ…

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General Food Topics • Re: Price Rollback on Augason Farms

September 27, 2017 LetsPrep11 0

Normally, the sales only last for a few days. If you check regularly, you’ll find new items on sale. The prices are constantly changing. I tend to only post when an item that rarely goes on sale, is suddenly offered a great price.

Just make sure you don’t buy from the other sellers on the Walmart site (lower right side of item description). The prices are ridiculous! Like, right now Overstock is selling the #10 can of Scrambled Eggs for $67.94 while Walmart’s price is $25.95.

Statistics: Posted by LetsPrep11 — Wed Sep 27, 2017 12:12 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 26, 2017 JayJay 0

I just baked a cake best by date april, 2013 and same for icing.
It wasn’t the best cake ever, but we’re still eating it!!

I opened a can of sirloin burger veg. soup best by oct, 2012 and husband wouldn’t eat it!! Wait, he is recovering from brain surgery, so factor that in.
I tasted it, and like most here, if I was really hungry, it would be fine–also, it was one of those flip top cans for campers that I have learned to not ever buy for long term storage. We live, we learn.

About that best by date—did you know that the best by date is printed on the can only when it is being shipped??
Yep–that can may have been in the warehouse the amount of time the best by date of the same product/can that has a different best by date of 2 years earlier!!!
Told by someone working in a warehouse.

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:21 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 26, 2017 Kilo_11 0

So to update: we’re on our third week of delicious 6-year old powdered milk and I couldn’t be happier with my preps. We’re drinking it normally, going through about 2-3 quarts a day which is the standard amount of milk my family drinks.

A few bullet points:
– I stored eight quart-sized bags to a bucket and I just opened the 4th bag tonight. That’s at least 6 weeks to a Home Depot bucket under normal intake. Good to know.
– The bags were packed with oxygen absorbers, two to a bag, and the bags come out rock-hard until you break the seal… as if they had been vacuum-packed
– So far we haven’t been poisoned by free radicals or had any ill effects. If nothing else my daughters drink more milk since the novelty hasn’t worn off.

So my answer to some of the debate on this thread is this: Yes it’s scientific fact that food degrades over time. I think the smell and taste test are reasonable to root out whether its fit for consumption. Though I like my food fresh, I’m not prepping so that I can feed hundreds of dollars of preps, not to mention storage time and effort, to chickens and dogs because I’m picky. I said for 21 years as a Paratrooper in the US Army, you train like you fight. Periodically rotating your preps out is never a bad idea. I’m a little later than I planned with the milk but this is valuable information and a satisfying test of our preparations.

Statistics: Posted by Kilo_11 — Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:33 pm


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General Food Topics • Price Rollback on Augason Farms

September 23, 2017 LetsPrep11 0

FYI Walmart.com has several good items on Rollback. I was really happy to see the #10 cans of Scrambled Eggs on sale as I needed 2 cans. Check these out! Type: Augason Farms in search box to see all items.

https://www.walmart.com/search/?cat_id=976759&facet=brand%3AAugason+Farms%7C%7Cspecial_offers%3ARollback%7C%7Cspecial_offers%3AReduced+Price&query=augason+farm+#searchProductResult

The Bakery kit is an excellent deal:
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Augason-Farms-Bakery-Food-Storage-Kit-10-Can-3-Pack/55702756

Statistics: Posted by LetsPrep11 — Sat Sep 23, 2017 11:25 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 18, 2017 anita 0

Swamp, you love to pick a fight.

I said that if it were all I had available, I’d drink the milk, eat the food, whatever, as long as it wasn’t obviously bad.

But that’s not what is going on here. This is about using up expired 5 (or so) year-old product, rather than feeding it to the chickens or dog or tossing it. My educated opinion is that it is penny-wise and pound foolish, but that’s just me. But I tend to be cautious about what I put in my body.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:09 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 18, 2017 daaswampman 0

There is no doubt that food degrades over time, but this site is about being prepared and what you can do with what you have!

If I thought the world was all safe and secure, I would not mess with this Preparedness Crap! A condo on the beach with room service comes to mind! Swamp

The exhausted swimmer, struggling to reach shore, isn’t worried about starving to death.

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Sun Sep 17, 2017 11:10 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 18, 2017 anita 0

There is no question that food products degrade over time. It doesn’t matter if it’s fresh, frozen, dried, or canned. If you don’t believe in free radicals, perhaps you’ll at least admit that the vitamins in the food diminish or the fats turn rancid.

If you doubt me, buy a can of the same food product, same manufacturer, every year, for 4 or 5 years. Open them all at the same time. Compare them. Will there be a difference? In all likelihood–yes. I can’t guarantee that it discernible for each and every item you might buy, but they degrade over time. I’ve noticed the difference in mushrooms, in beets, in carrots, in green beans, in canned soups. And that’s just a visual difference. Once I see it doesn’t look like a fresher product, I don’t taste it.

Eat them if you want, but there is no question that they won’t be as nutritious as a fresher product.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:41 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 18, 2017 anita 0

There is no question that food products degrade over time. It doesn’t matter if it’s fresh, frozen, dried, or canned. If you don’t believe in free radicals, perhaps you’ll at least admit that the vitamins in the food diminish or the fats turn rancid.

If you doubt me, buy a can of the same food product, same manufacturer, every year, for 4 or 5 years. Open them all at the same time. Compare them. Will there be a difference? In all likelihood–yes. I can’t guarantee that it discernible for each and every item you might buy, but they degrade over time. I’ve noticed the difference in mushrooms, in beets, in carrots, in green beans, in canned soups. And that’s just a visual difference. Once I see it doesn’t look like a fresher product, I don’t taste it.

Eat them if you want, but there is no question that they won’t be as nutritious as a fresher product.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:41 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 18, 2017 IceFire 0

One thing about that “best by” date to keep in mind. When the companies submit their product to the FDA for testing (they ALL have to do it for ALL products), oftentimes the date is arrived at because the FDA doesn’t test out any farther than that! (I learned this when I was helping a friend with his sauce business) The food may well be perfectly fine beyond this date, but it’s not tested out any farther than that, so they really don’t know. 2 years from packing date is pretty much the standard that they’ve come up with.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:50 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 17, 2017 daaswampman 0

While there is mountains of anecdotal evidence and a great deal of hype concerning free radicals, there are no clinical studies that proves long term effects. It is further clouded by the legions of health peddlers with something to sell!

Google it and notice the almost complete absence of clinical research from academic experts that are not selling something!

If you believed all the diet and health advice available, you might wonder why anyone dies! Free radicals MAY HAVE a long tern effect on cell health – that is what we KNOW!

Or you could visit a commercial dairy and processing plant! A few free radical will be the least of your concerns and you will never drink commercial milk again! Swamp

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milk

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Alimentarius

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Alimentarius

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:56 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 17, 2017 anita 0

I’m putting on my Food Science hat again. Sorry.

Just because you think it tastes fine doesn’t mean it is good for you. The fats and proteins degrade over time, and while it might not taste bad, it doesn’t mean there aren’t free radicals, rancid fats, etc in it.

I’m moving in a couple of weeks, and have been opening expired canned food and so forth and feeding to the dog, cats, and chickens, as appropriate. I don’t feel badly giving it to the pets, but that doesn’t mean I am willing to ingest it myself.

Having said that, the expiration date on foods is only an estimate, and more of a date to identify when the can was processed than a real “not good after” date. I’ve been eating cans of salmon that expired a year ago, but have recently given it up and started giving it to the pets. It looks/seems fine, but it’s getting too old for me to want to eat myself. (All the pets loved it though! The chickens found it particularly tasty. )

My guess–and it’s an educated guess, but just a guess–is that there have been some changes in the dehydrated milk that may make it not the best for you. If it looked/tasted fine in an emergency situation, I’d eat it as necessary, but I wouldn’t do it if it weren’t necessary. But that’s just me.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Sep 17, 2017 12:51 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 17, 2017 3ADScout 0

I believe we get mis-information from a variety of sources on food storage.
Many articles/manufacturer specs talk about storage being good up to 2 years but as you just witnessed the milk was fine. So what is the issue? Just like on our regular shelf food with “best by” dates the food doesn’t magically go rancid at midnight. It is simply a date that the manufacture uses to guarantee (in most cases) taste. The other issue with food storage is the nutritional value, so perhaps the milk didn’t provide you family with 100% of the USDA recommended vitimin D perhaps you only got 95%. Is that really an issue? Not for me and probably not for 99.9999% of the people on here (including you Kilo).

I remember as a kid playing in my great grand parents basement and looking at all the canned food that Great Grandma had worked so hard canning. Rusted bands and congealed fat made me think “I wouldn’t eat that!” But I did, best darn beef tips and noodles I ever had!!

Statistics: Posted by 3ADScout — Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:16 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 17, 2017 3ADScout 0

I believe we get mis-information from a variety of sources on food storage.
Many articles/manufacturer specs talk about storage being good up to 2 years but as you just witnessed the milk was fine. So what is the issue? Just like on our regular shelf food with “best by” dates the food doesn’t magically go rancid at midnight. It is simply a date that the manufacture uses to guarantee (in most cases) taste. The other issue with food storage is the nutritional value, so perhaps the milk didn’t provide you family with 100% of the USDA recommended vitimin D perhaps you only got 95%. Is that really an issue? Not for me and probably not for 99.9999% of the people on here (including you Kilo).

I remember as a kid playing in my great grand parents basement and looking at all the canned food that Great Grandma had worked so hard canning. Rusted bands and congealed fat made me think “I wouldn’t eat that!” But I did, best darn beef tips and noodles I ever had!!

Statistics: Posted by 3ADScout — Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:16 am


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General Food Topics • Six year-old powdered milk!

September 17, 2017 Kilo_11 0

Just wanted to share for all: I put up powdered milk in quart-size Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers in May 2011, eight quart bags to a home depot bucket… its been nagging at me for a few years now, since I read that dry milk would only keep 2 years or so in that fashion. I finally took the plunge this week when we ran out of milk and I cracked the seal. We’ve been drinking it all week and its fantastic… in fact the kids (5 and 8 year old girls) think its great fun that we are drinking “end of the world milk” as my wife calls it. Just goes to show that high-quality food will keep for very long periods of time when carefully preserved. The dry milk we put up is the Sanalac brand, which tastes WAAAY better than your average wal-mart junk. I am retired military, so we bought it at the Commissary on Fort Drum. I am going online to buy several more cases to store. I highly recommend it. Just FYI for any who are interested.

Statistics: Posted by Kilo_11 — Sat Sep 16, 2017 11:08 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 16, 2017 Lionheart1972 0

This is a really great reminder. I also had to learn this lesson the hard way. Storage conditions are critical to keeping our preps in good order. I also keep EVERYTHING off the floor especially food stores and ammo. I have had dry goods in number 10 cans in the boxes from the LDS Bishops Pantry stored in my basement in Kansas since 2011. I inspect them every year. No rust on the cans, no mold on the boxes. And yes, shelves are a must have item for anyone slightly OCD like me. Great post Angie.

Statistics: Posted by Lionheart1972 — Sat Sep 16, 2017 8:49 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 15, 2017 Gunns 0

I remember as a kid my dad told me never put anything on concrete. Nothing.

So we have always made shelves. Even in the garage I would make little decks to put the garbage cans up off the concrete.

Easy to keep things clean too.

Statistics: Posted by Gunns — Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:16 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 anita 0

Thanks for posting. I’m in the process of moving, and the house I’m buying has a partially finished basement with a high humidity level.

Here’s what has been suggested to me/I’m doing to relieve the problem. (Keeping the water away from the outside of the house goes a long way to relieve inside moisture problems. I realize you said you have a dry basement, but can’t hurt.)

1) Have the immediate exterior (3 or so feet closest to house) regraded to make sure water runs away from the house, rather than toward it when it rains. Keep mulch back from the house by a foot or two. (this helps with insect/termite/carpenter ants etc as well as getting rid of the moisture retaining mulch near the house)

2) Make sure downspouts have extensions, either above or below grade, that carry the water away from the house, rather than just dumping onto the ground beside the house.

3) Window wells should be covered.

4) As others mentioned, concrete is good at wicking, so keep everything off the floor. I will probably end up having the carpeting that is currently down there removed, as it smells musty at the moment (it didn’t earlier in the summer) Yet another thing I was not planning on doing, but such is the situation of buying a different house.)

5) Run dehumidifier, large capacity, and it will go via hose into the sump hole (even though the basement has a high humidity level, the sump pump supposedly never runs) That way it will run as much as necessary, rather than waiting to be dumped.

6) I’m having a duct put in from the heating/ac system into the finished part of the basement. I have to have some heating system changes made anyway, so this will be added to that.

I don’t know if any of those suggestions will help you, but maybe they will help someone.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:32 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 anita 0

Thanks for posting. I’m in the process of moving, and the house I’m buying has a partially finished basement with a high humidity level.

Here’s what has been suggested to me/I’m doing to relieve the problem. (Keeping the water away from the outside of the house goes a long way to relieve inside moisture problems. I realize you said you have a dry basement, but can’t hurt.)

1) Have the immediate exterior (3 or so feet closest to house) regraded to make sure water runs away from the house, rather than toward it when it rains. Keep mulch back from the house by a foot or two. (this helps with insect/termite/carpenter ants etc as well as getting rid of the moisture retaining mulch near the house)

2) Make sure downspouts have extensions, either above or below grade, that carry the water away from the house, rather than just dumping onto the ground beside the house.

3) Window wells should be covered.

4) As others mentioned, concrete is good at wicking, so keep everything off the floor. I will probably end up having the carpeting that is currently down there removed, as it smells musty at the moment (it didn’t earlier in the summer) Yet another thing I was not planning on doing, but such is the situation of buying a different house.)

5) Run dehumidifier, large capacity, and it will go via hose into the sump hole (even though the basement has a high humidity level, the sump pump supposedly never runs) That way it will run as much as necessary, rather than waiting to be dumped.

6) I’m having a duct put in from the heating/ac system into the finished part of the basement. I have to have some heating system changes made anyway, so this will be added to that.

I don’t know if any of those suggestions will help you, but maybe they will help someone.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:32 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 TRex2 0
Fullmoon wrote:
Basement floors are notorious for this kind of thing, the concrete will wick moisture from the ground below it which remains wet from all that rain. I don’t know if a dehumidifier will help with the floor problem. They are designed to remove water vapor from the air but as long as the cement floor wicks water it may be a lost cause. All food items should be placed on 2x4s or shelving, never directly on the floor. Even the buckets should be up off the floor just to be safe. Too much work and money invested to have this happen to your stuff.

Sorry to hear that you had to learn this the hard way. I think this is something we need to address a little more frequently when teaching new preppers how to keep stuff safe and secure.

The wicking of moisture from the ground is known to people who design reinforced concrete, although I was taught that it is only significant for a couple of inches. We were taught to make sure the rebar was at least two and a half inches from the surface of the concrete to prevent corrosion. Cement block walls are a different animal. I have seen water wick through 10 inch cement blocks at such a rate it ran down the walls, and when we tried to coat them with sealant, it eventually pushed the sealant off of the blocks. Of course, that basement had totally saturated soil outside of the walls (design flaw).
Lesson:
Be sure not to overlook any contact points between stuff and the walls.

When I worked in logistics, we were taught never to put anything that could mold in contact with concrete, but that was because, unless the air is desert dry, the point where anything comes into contact with concrete will attract moisture like a magnet. Every thing went on pallets. In my own storage system, I just use an expendable piece of wood between the stuff and the floor.

The dehumidifier will just about (but not completely, unless you already live in a dry climate) cure the problem with moisture in the totes. But, while the dehumidifier will help with the moisture from the floor, but it won’t cure it, so lessons 4, 5, and 6 never go away.

Statistics: Posted by TRex2 — Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:36 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 TRex2 0
Fullmoon wrote:
Basement floors are notorious for this kind of thing, the concrete will wick moisture from the ground below it which remains wet from all that rain. I don’t know if a dehumidifier will help with the floor problem. They are designed to remove water vapor from the air but as long as the cement floor wicks water it may be a lost cause. All food items should be placed on 2x4s or shelving, never directly on the floor. Even the buckets should be up off the floor just to be safe. Too much work and money invested to have this happen to your stuff.

Sorry to hear that you had to learn this the hard way. I think this is something we need to address a little more frequently when teaching new preppers how to keep stuff safe and secure.

The wicking of moisture from the ground is known to people who design reinforced concrete, although I was taught that it is only significant for a couple of inches. We were taught to make sure the rebar was at least two and a half inches from the surface of the concrete to prevent corrosion. Cement block walls are a different animal. I have seen water wick through 10 inch cement blocks at such a rate it ran down the walls, and when we tried to coat them with sealant, it eventually pushed the sealant off of the blocks. Of course, that basement had totally saturated soil outside of the walls (design flaw).
Lesson:
Be sure not to overlook any contact points between stuff and the walls.

When I worked in logistics, we were taught never to put anything that could mold in contact with concrete, but that was because, unless the air is desert dry, the point where anything comes into contact with concrete will attract moisture like a magnet. Every thing went on pallets. In my own storage system, I just use an expendable piece of wood between the stuff and the floor.

The dehumidifier will just about (but not completely, unless you already live in a dry climate) cure the problem with moisture in the totes. But, while the dehumidifier will help with the moisture from the floor, but it won’t cure it, so lessons 4, 5, and 6 never go away.

Statistics: Posted by TRex2 — Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:36 am


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Basement floors are notorious for this kind of thing, the concrete will wick moisture from the ground below it which remains wet from all that rain. I don’t know if a dehumidifier will help with the floor problem. They are designed to remove water vapor from the air but as long as the cement floor wicks water it may be a lost cause. All food items should be placed on 2x4s or shelving, never directly on the floor. Even the buckets should be up off the floor just to be safe. Too much work and money invested to have this happen to your stuff.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:26 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Basement floors are notorious for this kind of thing, the concrete will wick moisture from the ground below it which remains wet from all that rain. I don’t know if a dehumidifier will help with the floor problem. They are designed to remove water vapor from the air but as long as the cement floor wicks water it may be a lost cause. All food items should be placed on 2x4s or shelving, never directly on the floor. Even the buckets should be up off the floor just to be safe. Too much work and money invested to have this happen to your stuff.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:26 pm


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General Food Topics • Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 angie_nrs 0

At the beginning of the summer I finished my basement. We coated the floor with garage floor sealant and then covered it with a very thin carpeting just to make it a bit more comfy. We also painted all the walls with a latex sealant and then painted (with regular paint) over that. I thought the basement would be good to go since it seemed solid up to that point as we never had any water leaks or problems even though we got a ton of rain this spring and summer.

This summer I started putting canned goods and such down there. So, boxes of canned goods have been sitting there for a few months. I left boxes stacked on the floor and planned to organize it all in early fall. I just got some storage racks put together and was starting to get things put in their appropriate place today. When I was picking up boxes from the floor, I noticed that the cardboard was just slightly moist on the bottom boxes. Also, some of my homemade canned goods had that white mold film on the outside of the glass jars. I guess I underestimated the role of humidity coming from the floor in the basement. It stays closed up for the most part, but it’s not air tight. It’s always much cooler down there. Temps are usually in the 50’s or maybe low 60’s on hot days. I guess I should’ve kept the dehumidifier down there b/c I checked a plastic tote (that was on the floor) that had 6 packs of salt in it (along with some other things) and the salt was hard as a rock and the paper on the bottom of them looked moist. Grrrrrrr! So glad salt is cheap! The salt I stored in a bucket was fine.

So here’s some lessons learned for anyone considering doing the same thing.

1. Keep a humidity reader in your basement on the floor.
2. Keep a dehumidifier in your basement!
3. Don’t store anything directly on the floor, even if it’s in a tote.
4. Keep in mind that totes won’t keep air out of the box. Only sealed buckets will do that.
5. Keep things stored on racks to keep things off the floor and make it easier to keep an eye on things.
6. Don’t just store it and forget it. You have to keep checking things to make sure they are holding up OK.

I’m glad I found all of this out before I started storing my books and photos down there. Once I get the excess water out of the air and keep the dehumidifier on, i’m hoping it will be problem solved. I guess I should’ve invested in floor padding……too late now.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:08 pm


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General Food Topics • Storing food in a basement

September 13, 2017 angie_nrs 0

At the beginning of the summer I finished my basement. We coated the floor with garage floor sealant and then covered it with a very thin carpeting just to make it a bit more comfy. We also painted all the walls with a latex sealant and then painted (with regular paint) over that. I thought the basement would be good to go since it seemed solid up to that point as we never had any water leaks or problems even though we got a ton of rain this spring and summer.

This summer I started putting canned goods and such down there. So, boxes of canned goods have been sitting there for a few months. I left boxes stacked on the floor and planned to organize it all in early fall. I just got some storage racks put together and was starting to get things put in their appropriate place today. When I was picking up boxes from the floor, I noticed that the cardboard was just slightly moist on the bottom boxes. Also, some of my homemade canned goods had that white mold film on the outside of the glass jars. I guess I underestimated the role of humidity coming from the floor in the basement. It stays closed up for the most part, but it’s not air tight. It’s always much cooler down there. Temps are usually in the 50’s or maybe low 60’s on hot days. I guess I should’ve kept the dehumidifier down there b/c I checked a plastic tote (that was on the floor) that had 6 packs of salt in it (along with some other things) and the salt was hard as a rock and the paper on the bottom of them looked moist. Grrrrrrr! So glad salt is cheap! The salt I stored in a bucket was fine.

So here’s some lessons learned for anyone considering doing the same thing.

1. Keep a humidity reader in your basement on the floor.
2. Keep a dehumidifier in your basement!
3. Don’t store anything directly on the floor, even if it’s in a tote.
4. Keep in mind that totes won’t keep air out of the box. Only sealed buckets will do that.
5. Keep things stored on racks to keep things off the floor and make it easier to keep an eye on things.
6. Don’t just store it and forget it. You have to keep checking things to make sure they are holding up OK.

I’m glad I found all of this out before I started storing my books and photos down there. Once I get the excess water out of the air and keep the dehumidifier on, i’m hoping it will be problem solved. I guess I should’ve invested in floor padding……too late now.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:08 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Electric vs Gas Operated Stoves and Ovens

September 5, 2017 ToolsOfSurvival 0

I’m not sure I’d feel much more comfortable with either gas or electric in a serious emergency situation. I think they both have vulnerabilities. What makes me feel more comfortable and secure is having redundancy and alternatives. As others have already mentioned, there are many other cooking fuels and tools that could be a solid backup plan in the event that either your gas or electric stove weren’t working. Propane and butane are two easy options. Butane has the advantage of being safe to use indoors. Butane stoves are also incredibly inexpensive. You can also store wood and charcoal as cooking fuels. One really important tool that I think every home should have is a solar oven of some type. Solar ovens can be used to cook food on sunny days, preserving your Propane, Butane, wood, and other fuels for non-sunny days when a solar oven can’t be used. By using a solar oven on all sunny days that allow for it, you’ll be stretching out the amount of time that your other fuel sources can last. Something to consider.

Statistics: Posted by ToolsOfSurvival — Mon Sep 04, 2017 9:15 pm