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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 20, 2017 bacpacker1513 0

I just have a few trees. 2 Golden Delicious, Lodi, Orange Pippin, Arkansas Black, Granny Smith, 2 Honey Crisp, Stayman Winesap, and a couple others that I have forgotten the names of. Plus a couple of Pears, Mulberry, Nectarine, couple of Paw Paws, couple of Pecans, and 10 Blueberries. Nothing like you have and I’m trying to learn as I go. But it should be more than what the wife and I will need and leave some left over for barter or animal feed if need be. I tried several varieties to see what worked best in this area. But the wife loves putting up Honey Crisp and Winesaps the best. And we like eating Goldens fresh. I have lost a couple of trees and think I’ll go back with additional Honey Crisp to fill in the holes and any future needs. Still adding to the nut’s and Blueberries.

Statistics: Posted by bacpacker1513 — Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:48 pm


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 anita 0

I read on a homesteader blog not to do pruning now, because of the unseasonably warm weather. (The pruning would make the tree start to come out of its dormancy?) Is that true? Thanks Outback.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Feb 19, 2017 5:47 pm


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0
bacpacker1513 wrote:
Good info again Outback. I have all my pruning done with the exception of my 2 oldest trees,

What varieties do you have bacpacker?

Man I’m sore! Worked for about 5 hours pruning today. Getting old I guess! This is a cool pic I took a couple years ago in my high density orchard. I’ve got just over 1300 trees on an acre and a third. Training and pruning is quite different than traditional central leader trees. These are dwarf trees, the branches are bent to below 90 degrees to keep them small and stimulate them to fruit in just 1-2 years after planting! They are planted 3′ apart and 11′ between rows. The net result is about 1000 bushel of apples per acre, as opposed to about 350 to 500 bushel per acre on full sized trees. This is why you may have seen most commercial orchards going over to this system, or something similar.

Now, I know what you all are thinking! I’m going to be a target if the shtf. I know! I have a couple friends that will be helping me, and I will recruit more for people that will help with chores and security. But it will be tough, I know that, but it does give me something good to barter! A friend and I have put up a couple blinds around the perimeter that we use for hunting but will double as lookout posts too.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 4:11 pm


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

I’d be happy to answer any questions. Every tree is a little different and there are many ways to attack problems. I may not get back to you for a bit though, I’ve got about 600 more trees in moy orchards to get pruned! Off I go….

P.S…… Tarps work great for moving cut branches out of orchards!

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:39 am


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

……and top cleaned up.

Ok, that is a few basics, and keep in mind, there is loads more, but these are the main points of pruning central leader trees. I

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:30 am


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

3) As said before, strong up rights can be taken out, and also pendant wood. This is wood growing down underneath the main branch. Pendant wood generally does not get as much light than side branches and puts out poorer quality fruit. Take them out so this energy goes to our best fruiting wood.

4) Never make heading cuts. A heading cut are cuts made to shorten a branch. When a heading cut is made, it blocks the flow of growth hormone that goes out to the tips of branches. This hormone will induce branching, not good. We’re trying to thin things out, not grow a bunch of unneeded wood. Pruning in winter does stimulate some growth, so again, fewer cuts are better.

5) keep your top simple. Trees tend to fork out at the top, so cut out aggressive branches at the top. If you have a crowded top, you just shade out lower down in the tree. This top is forking…….

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:09 am


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

……After taking out the fork. Now there is plenty of room, and we only made one cut. Keep in mind, you do not want to make a bunch of cuts, fewer cuts are better. At the most you do not want to take out more than 30% of the entire canopy is the rule of thumb. However, I would advise even less.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:49 am


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

2) On older trees we want to keep a good balance to the tree and again, good light and airflow. Branches need to be keep growing out at different directions to get that light. Any crossing side branches can be taken out.

Keep branches simple! You want one strong branch growing out with small side branches growing off of it. If the branch forks, take it out. No forks!

You do want branches growing out away from the main branch though. This will be our fruiting wood. When a tree is old enough to fruit, years 2 through 4 year old branches are our best fruiting wood. If a side branch has gotten too big (generally over half the diameter of the main branch) and is crowding out other branches, take it out.

In this pic, you can see an obvious fork.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:44 am


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Gardening • Re: Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

Here’s another look at a little older tree. One nice straight leader and a few scaffolds of strong branches going out at different directions around the leader. This will give your tree branches maximum light and airflow. You can see, each year you have another scaffold of branches growing out around the tree. The upper ones smaller than the ones below them, giving you a Christmas tree look…

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:27 am


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Gardening • Pruning Apples

February 19, 2017 theoutback 0

I promised a few here I would post about pruning apples so here goes….

First a few basics on the basics of why we prune. If you take away anything from this, remember this….. We are trying to get both light and airflow throughout the tree! …………… Light contributes in both photosynthesis, for fuel thus strength of the trees, but also bud development for strong viable blossoms. Airflow is important to cut down on the numerous pathological diseases apples are susceptible to.

There are several methods of “training” trees, but I’ll be focussing on central leader pruning, which is the most common training method and the easiest training method.

1) With the first couple years after planting of growth there is very little pruning needed, but it is important to get them started in the right direction, which is good strong upward growth and frame. We first need a strong framework to hold many pounds of heavy apples and hold up against strong winds. Make sure the leader grows up in one central leader! If there are two, cut out the weaker of the two. Make a flush cut close to the leader you will be keeping. Never leave stubs! Where branches come off of other branches or the leader there is a ” collar ” . Cut right on the edge of the collar that you are cutting off. This will allow this cut to heal over as quickly as possible. Also try to make make it as flush/flat with the contour of the collar. Making it on an angle will cause it to grow unwanted growth. (water sprouts/ suckers). You may still get some suckers despite making a good cut, just prune them out in mid summer.

Also any strong uprights can be cut out the first year or two.

We want one nice straight strong leader! So this is step one. If you have bought a tree at some nursery or big box store, you can also cut out an extra leader at planting. One straight leader, a scaffold of branches, then one straight leader going up, like in this picture….. (keep in mind pruning is done in concert with training, the manipulation of the leader and branches to go in desired directions)

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:17 am


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Gardening • Re: Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 JayJay 0
Illini Warrior wrote:

JayJay wrote:Poster’s second post with link to sell us something??
Puh–leeze!!!

their BS could use an intelligence input …

I don’t click the links any longer–learned long ago if first post…don’t.

Statistics: Posted by JayJay — Wed Feb 01, 2017 5:41 pm


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Gardening • Re: Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
Fullmoon wrote:
Do you have a fence around your garden? A family sized garden plot is easy to fence in to keep the deer away. Mine is 6′ high “no climb” type fence material and it keeps most critters on the outside looking in. I still have potato’s in the ground under 6″ of straw and dig them up as we need them.

???? … it’s a con posting wrapped around an ad link for camera systems ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Wed Feb 01, 2017 3:39 pm


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Gardening • Re: Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Do you have a fence around your garden? A family sized garden plot is easy to fence in to keep the deer away. Mine is 6′ high “no climb” type fence material and it keeps most critters on the outside looking in. I still have potato’s in the ground under 6″ of straw and dig them up as we need them.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Wed Feb 01, 2017 3:26 pm


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Gardening • Re: Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 handyman777 0

I use a browning dark ops. It has the no-glow IR flash.
Colored pictures for day and black and white at night, it takes pics. out to 70 ft +/-
It worked great for night time surveillance, play the card back in my tablet and save the pics. I needed.
Whats nice is you can set this in different locations, where you think you may need it..small, compact and easily concealable. not like a permanent set up on your home and if you have an intruder they may be able to pick up on your surveillance system attached to your home.
Both are good but a trail cam is mobile.

Statistics: Posted by handyman777 — Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:49 am


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Gardening • Re: Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0

Hmmmm….Greenery Grabbers! Rhubarb Robbers! Tomato Thieves!!! Pumpkin Pullers!….I could go on, but wont. :p

A security camera system is never a bad idea…There are hundreds out there with the different recording options and cost.

Are you sure you need that level of security just from the garden incident or do you want whole house coverage anyways?

There’s always a trail cam to just keep an eye on things…..You can put it up at night and leave it, not drawing attention to the location until you notice your next Artichoke Abductor(couldn’t resist :p ) and then pull the card to see if you know the perp. It’s most likely a local resident if happening repeatedly…..If it was just a one off situation the trail cam will cost you much less…

I had a brand new lawn that kept getting dug up in the middle of the city here in CA and large clumps of the new sod being left on my rear patio…strangest thing…..Couldn’t figure it out for weeks. Got the camera, watched the lawn, checked the card, and WHAMO…Critter ID’d. Raccoon’s were coming out of the sewer and digging up grubs….lol…Made for some pretty funny images actually. Then I approached it and solved it from the right direction knowing it was the raccoon I had to target.

Here’s the 2016 reviews and cost you might want to consider… http://www.trailcampro.com/collections/trail-camera-reviews

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:21 am


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Gardening • Re: Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
lowan1 wrote:
Hello guys,I have a garden at my home.I love gardening and would love planting small flowering plants and vegetables.Two days back when I got up in the morning I came to see that my garden was clumsy.Some of the plants were cut down and I feel so sad.But somehow I manage to keep my garden in the original state and I don’t know who have done this.So now I am thinking of installing a outdoor camera so that I would monitor the garden.I heard about http://cspalarms.ca/cctvsecuritycameras/and hope it would meet my requirements.I would like to get a lot more suggestions on this.Any insight on this would be great.Thanks in advance.

????? … what was cut down in an Iowa garden in February? …. what’s to mess with?

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:16 am


Gardening • Security help for my garden

February 1, 2017 lowan1 0

Hello guys,I have a garden at my home.I love gardening and would love planting small flowering plants and vegetables.Two days back when I got up in the morning I came to see that my garden was clumsy.Some of the plants were cut down and I feel so sad.But somehow I manage to keep my garden in the original state and I don’t know who have done this.So now I am thinking of installing a outdoor camera so that I would monitor the garden.I heard about http://cspalarms.ca/cctvsecuritycameras/and hope it would meet my requirements.I would like to get a lot more suggestions on this.Any insight on this would be great.Thanks in advance.

Statistics: Posted by lowan1 — Wed Feb 01, 2017 4:20 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 29, 2017 IceFire 0

We’ve got a LOT of trees on our land…unfortunately, it’s mostly mesquite! While it makes good firewood (It’s a “ironwood”, so VERY hard) that burns long and hot, and the “beans” can be ground to make a high-protein, gluten-free flour, it ALSO tends to be allelopathic…keeps other plants from sprouting. I’m in the process (very SLOW process) of removing a lot of it. So far, what we’ve removed has gone into brush piles to provide habitat for rabbits and quail. I’ll be planting berry bushes along the perimeter fence lines (nice THORNY ones, that people will NOT want to tangle with) as well as olive trees–both height and width make a nice “privacy screen”. The orchard trees go farther in, closer to the house. When the SHTF, I plan on trapping rabbits FIRST, before I start butchering my own. That will serve to both provide us with a free source of meat, PLUS reduce the threat to my garden, orchard, and vineyard.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sun Jan 29, 2017 10:26 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 29, 2017 theoutback 0

Ya, I knew they were there, I was just joking. However it is a good passive step in prepping that we do not ever talk about.

If you have the land, there are tons of things you can do to make your land more attractive to wildlife. Example: Cutting trees (I know you may not have them down there) down for firewood allows for more browse to come up,raspberries, blackberries, etc..That’s good habitat for deer, quail, grouse, rabbits etc. piling up the branches not used for firewood makes great homes for rabbits and fowl. I’ve got several around my property, and have lots of rabbits too. The thicker your woods the better. Humans think old growth forests are attractive, but animals do not. No food (other than nuts), no cover in mature woods.

Also planting food plots or frost seeding fields with more tasty plants such as white clover make fields much more attractive to deer and rabbits. Planting fruit trees, apples, pears, oaks, chestnuts, also make your property more attractive to wildlife and give you fruit as well.

Having your property wildlife friendly is a great prep. Many hunters know about these practices. Also, besides a little work, you do not have to feed them. Should the shtf these areas will be a great source for food and others may not recognize it. Your gardens, high tunnels and the like will be more apt to be seen and raided.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun Jan 29, 2017 4:55 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 29, 2017 IceFire 0
theoutback wrote:

IceFire wrote:

Stahlrosen wrote: Who knew rabbits ate onions? Sigh……

Stahlrosen, about the ONLY thing in my garden that the rabbits DIDN’T eat was the asparagus. They absolutely devoured everything else, but the asparagus they didn’t touch.

Good job raising those freerange rabbits Icefire. Sounds like you have plenty of meat should the shtf! :thumbup:

theoutback, the rabbits were already here when we got here…along with the quail, javelina, doves, and occasional deer. Oh, and the coyotes (fortunately, so far they’ve been staying on the OTHER side of the fence, because I do NOT need them going after my chickens or goats! Although, seeing the way my doe reacted to the dog, I’d say the coyotes would be in trouble. She may not have horns, but she is deadly accurate with her head!) Plenty of “wild” meat around here, as well as what I’m raising.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sun Jan 29, 2017 12:11 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 anita 0

Red onions don’t last too long. I buy the bunch of three types of onions from Dixondale, which is about 1/3 red, 1/3 white, and 1/3 yellow, and that’s plenty of red onions for salads etc in the summer. I buy another bunch of the Yellow (Copa, I think?). I end up dehydrating whatever I don’t use up of all of them fairly quickly. I love making soup and just tossing in a handful of onions. So convenient.

I got potato onions this fall, and Egyptian walking onions last fall. I haven’t used the Egyptian walking for more than green onions so far. But they both are perennial, so I don’t have to worry about not having access to seeds or sets, if need be.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:28 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 theoutback 0
IceFire wrote:

Stahlrosen wrote: Who knew rabbits ate onions? Sigh……

Stahlrosen, about the ONLY thing in my garden that the rabbits DIDN’T eat was the asparagus. They absolutely devoured everything else, but the asparagus they didn’t touch.

Good job raising those freerange rabbits Icefire. Sounds like you have plenty of meat should the shtf! :thumbup:

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:06 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 IceFire 0
Stahlrosen wrote:
Who knew rabbits ate onions? Sigh……

Stahlrosen, about the ONLY thing in my garden that the rabbits DIDN’T eat was the asparagus. They absolutely devoured everything else, but the asparagus they didn’t touch.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:58 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
Stahlrosen wrote:

bacpacker1513 wrote:We chopped and froze a lot of our Red onions in meal size bags last year. They didn’t keep nearly as well. We’ll run a bunch thru the Excaliber dehydrator this year and give that a shot.

I found that if I saute the onions before freezing they do better. We generally use them in soups or spaghetti, omelets and such, and they seemed to do fine.
Probably only going to try and plant a few this year. Rabbits got all mine last year. :x Who knew rabbits ate onions? Quote

Try planting some sacrificial clover, Stahlrosen. I had a wild rabbit problem until I encouraged a large patch of clover. They went for the clover before anything else. Coyotes have been increasing in numbers. Now, there isn’t a rabbit to be seen anywhere. At least coyotes don’t eat vegetables.
Reb

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:53 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Stahlrosen wrote:

bacpacker1513 wrote:We chopped and froze a lot of our Red onions in meal size bags last year. They didn’t keep nearly as well. We’ll run a bunch thru the Excaliber dehydrator this year and give that a shot.

I found that if I saute the onions before freezing they do better. We generally use them in soups or spaghetti, omelets and such, and they seemed to do fine.
Probably only going to try and plant a few this year. Rabbits got all mine last year. :x Who knew rabbits ate onions? Sigh……

Really?

Interesting.

I can not get my rabbits (domesticated types) to eat onions.

Neither my hogs.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:26 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
daaswampman wrote:

rebnavy1862 wrote:

catfeet wrote:Indeed, many of which came from conservatives. Need I remind you of the “Obama is coming to to take our guns away” arguement that I’ve seen, as late as two weeks ago? Neither side is free from blame here, but continuing the argument, after you’ve won is like sticking out your tongue and saying “neener neener”. Being flat out mean to people, simply because you don’t agree with them is beneath us as Americans.

Catfeet, who doesn’t agree with any number of individuals, but who keeps her tongue behind her teeth so’s she doesn’t beat up on them

I’ll be 71 in two days. I don’t do “neener-neener” anymore. Satire is an American tradition. It predates the revolution. And, someone needs to explain to the libs who won the election.
Reb
Feeling all warm and fuzzy, wanting to hug a liberal.

Don’t do it!!! The only way your going to hug a liberal is if your going to jump off a cliff! Happy Birthday Reb! Swamp

You know what a “crying shame” is Swamp? A bus load of libs going off a cliff with one empty seat!
Reb
Thanks for the birthday wishes.

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:20 am


Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 Stahlrosen 0
bacpacker1513 wrote:
We chopped and froze a lot of our Red onions in meal size bags last year. They didn’t keep nearly as well. We’ll run a bunch thru the Excaliber dehydrator this year and give that a shot.

I found that if I saute the onions before freezing they do better. We generally use them in soups or spaghetti, omelets and such, and they seemed to do fine.
Probably only going to try and plant a few this year. Rabbits got all mine last year. :x Who knew rabbits ate onions? Sigh……

Statistics: Posted by Stahlrosen — Sat Jan 28, 2017 8:13 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 theoutback 0
rebnavy1862 wrote:

catfeet wrote:Reb
Feeling all warm and fuzzy, wanting to hug a liberal.

Quick, somebody slap him! Snap out of it Reb, snap out of it!………….. :o:p

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:45 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 daaswampman 0
rebnavy1862 wrote:

catfeet wrote:Indeed, many of which came from conservatives. Need I remind you of the “Obama is coming to to take our guns away” arguement that I’ve seen, as late as two weeks ago? Neither side is free from blame here, but continuing the argument, after you’ve won is like sticking out your tongue and saying “neener neener”. Being flat out mean to people, simply because you don’t agree with them is beneath us as Americans.

Catfeet, who doesn’t agree with any number of individuals, but who keeps her tongue behind her teeth so’s she doesn’t beat up on them

I’ll be 71 in two days. I don’t do “neener-neener” anymore. Satire is an American tradition. It predates the revolution. And, someone needs to explain to the libs who won the election.
Reb
Feeling all warm and fuzzy, wanting to hug a liberal.

Don’t do it!!! The only way your going to hug a liberal is if your going to jump off a cliff! Happy Birthday Reb! Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Sat Jan 28, 2017 12:07 am


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 bacpacker1513 0

We chopped and froze a lot of our Red onions in meal size bags last year. They didn’t keep nearly as well. We’ll run a bunch thru the Excaliber dehydrator this year and give that a shot.

Statistics: Posted by bacpacker1513 — Fri Jan 27, 2017 11:01 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 anita 0

I get my onions from Dixondale every year. Huge onions. I dehydrate most of them, and don’t have to worry about storage.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Fri Jan 27, 2017 10:37 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 bacpacker1513 0

Just ordered my onion slips yesterday from www.Dixondale.com. I first ordered from them last year and had excellent luck with most types I got. I choose 7 types last year to try different stuff to see what worked good here. This year pared it down to 3 types with one being my largest choice. It was a great keeper in storage and produced nice large onions. I highly recommend them.

Statistics: Posted by bacpacker1513 — Fri Jan 27, 2017 9:48 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 28, 2017 Stahlrosen 0
IceFire wrote:

cellengrac wrote:I carried my little rabbit garden gifts down to the planter box yesterday. This will be my third year in our stepping stone house. It is on a steep hill have had a lot of problems figuring out how to garden on a hill. I am relocating to the front yard this year which isn’t as steep. I am ordering some peet pellets to start next week. I am also ordering some extra to use next year.
I tried the potato cage last year using wheat straw and it didn’t work either. After if listening to The video on the other post this may be my forever house. Any tips on gardening on a hill would be very much appreciated. I have always had a level to gently rolling yard. After tilling the first time most of my good dirt washed over the cliff so I am saving all my animals gifts kitchen scraps leaves and what not to compost but that will be another year before I have enough.

We used to live on what I referred to as “the hill from he!!” Over a period of a couple of years, I terraced it, to give me some level planting areas, and keep everything from washing down the hill every time it rained. You can use cinderblocks, those “castlewall” blocks, rock walls, etc. as retaining walls to hold the soil in place. Start from the bottom, build a retaining wall (it can be as low as 6 inches to a foot or more, depending on the steepness of your hill) then level the ground back a couple of feet. At the back of that terrace, do another wall, and repeat. People in many cultures around the world have used terracing in order to farm on steep hills.

IceFire is right, about the only way to do it is terrace, use blocking methods and build up small areas. We live on the side of a mountain, in the woods, on a rock. :blink: So I have little garden areas here and there where I have modified the area to put in a crop or two, then something else in the next area. I use logs for terrace building, because that’s what I have. The horse area is quasi level, but still on a significant enough slope that we have lost about 4″- 6″ in “soil” over the last several years, so I put big logs at the edge of their area, collect the top soil that drains off the mountain, and cart it back up to the garden areas. One…..bucket….at …a …..time…. :crazy:

Statistics: Posted by Stahlrosen — Fri Jan 27, 2017 7:01 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 27, 2017 IceFire 0
cellengrac wrote:
I carried my little rabbit garden gifts down to the planter box yesterday. This will be my third year in our stepping stone house. It is on a steep hill have had a lot of problems figuring out how to garden on a hill. I am relocating to the front yard this year which isn’t as steep. I am ordering some peet pellets to start next week. I am also ordering some extra to use next year.
I tried the potato cage last year using wheat straw and it didn’t work either. After if listening to The video on the other post this may be my forever house. Any tips on gardening on a hill would be very much appreciated. I have always had a level to gently rolling yard. After tilling the first time most of my good dirt washed over the cliff so I am saving all my animals gifts kitchen scraps leaves and what not to compost but that will be another year before I have enough.

We used to live on what I referred to as “the hill from he!!” Over a period of a couple of years, I terraced it, to give me some level planting areas, and keep everything from washing down the hill every time it rained. You can use cinderblocks, those “castlewall” blocks, rock walls, etc. as retaining walls to hold the soil in place. Start from the bottom, build a retaining wall (it can be as low as 6 inches to a foot or more, depending on the steepness of your hill) then level the ground back a couple of feet. At the back of that terrace, do another wall, and repeat. People in many cultures around the world have used terracing in order to farm on steep hills.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:54 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 27, 2017 anita 0
cellengrac wrote:
I carried my little rabbit garden gifts down to the planter box yesterday. This will be my third year in our stepping stone house. It is on a steep hill have had a lot of problems figuring out how to garden on a hill. I am relocating to the front yard this year which isn’t as steep. I am ordering some peet pellets to start next week. I am also ordering some extra to use next year.
I tried the potato cage last year using wheat straw and it didn’t work either. After if listening to The video on the other post this may be my forever house. Any tips on gardening on a hill would be very much appreciated. I have always had a level to gently rolling yard. After tilling the first time most of my good dirt washed over the cliff so I am saving all my animals gifts kitchen scraps leaves and what not to compost but that will be another year before I have enough.

Can you use raised beds? I’ve seen those used on a slope. You have to build up the lower end more than the higher end, so if you aren’t handy it could be a problem.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:51 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 27, 2017 cellengrac 0

I carried my little rabbit garden gifts down to the planter box yesterday. This will be my third year in our stepping stone house. It is on a steep hill have had a lot of problems figuring out how to garden on a hill. I am relocating to the front yard this year which isn’t as steep. I am ordering some peet pellets to start next week. I am also ordering some extra to use next year.
I tried the potato cage last year using wheat straw and it didn’t work either. After if listening to The video on the other post this may be my forever house. Any tips on gardening on a hill would be very much appreciated. I have always had a level to gently rolling yard. After tilling the first time most of my good dirt washed over the cliff so I am saving all my animals gifts kitchen scraps leaves and what not to compost but that will be another year before I have enough.

Statistics: Posted by cellengrac — Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:16 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 27, 2017 Cast Iron 0
anita wrote:
Driven — Get out of California.

Cast Iron – I grew purple sweet potatoes the last couple of years (in addition to Georgia Jets.) They aren’t nearly as sweet, and are mealier. The three or so plants I put in last year did produce, though. I will keep growing a couple, I suppose. I use them to make a quiche crust (got to use up all those eggs somehow) instead of flour, since I’m gluten free.

Ah. Thank you for the information.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:07 pm


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Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 27, 2017 Cast Iron 0
anita wrote:
Driven — Get out of California.

Cast Iron – I grew purple sweet potatoes the last couple of years (in addition to Georgia Jets.) They aren’t nearly as sweet, and are mealier. The three or so plants I put in last year did produce, though. I will keep growing a couple, I suppose. I use them to make a quiche crust (got to use up all those eggs somehow) instead of flour, since I’m gluten free.

Ah. Thank you for the information.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Fri Jan 27, 2017 2:07 pm


No Picture

Gardening • Re: Garden 2017

January 27, 2017 IceFire 0

Let’s put an END to the political BS in a NON-political thread RIGHT NOW! The OP was strictly a GARDENING thread, and there was NO REASON to introduce ANYONE’S political leanings into it! I don’t care if anyone leans red, blue, or pink with purple polka dots! This is NOT the place for it! Now behave, or I’ll take you all out to the woodshed!

OK, moderator/mom voice off.

I’ve got peas coming up, and just waiting for the spinach, lettuce, parsley, scallions, and carrots to start coming up.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Fri Jan 27, 2017 1:15 pm