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Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 21, 2017 theoutback 0

If you are talking Japanese beetles, those pheromone traps work good. Just don’t put them close to the plants you are trying to protect. Put them up wind of the plants you want to protect at least 50 yards. If you put them to close to the plants, you will just attract them to your plants.

Sevin (Carbaryl)works real good on them just do not use on pome fruit right at fruit set, they will thin fruit, unless it is your intention. After fruit is over 20 mm it will not thin and can be used with no fruit loss. We use it on bad years for J beetles, but we don’t see them here in Vermont for another month.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun May 21, 2017 4:03 pm


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Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 21, 2017 theoutback 0

If you are talking Japanese beetles, those pheromone traps work good. Just don’t put them close to the plants you are trying to protect. Put them up wind of the plants you want to protect at least 50 yards. If you put them to close to the plants, you will just attract them to your plants.

Sevin (Carbaryl)works real good on them just do not use on pome fruit right at fruit set, they will thin fruit, unless it is your intention. After fruit is over 20 mm it will not thin and can be used with no fruit loss. We use it on bad years for J beetles, but we don’t see them here in Vermont for another month.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Sun May 21, 2017 4:03 pm


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Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 19, 2017 rebnavy1862 0

What kind of beetles? You can use Sevin dust or spray. Bonide makes organic sprays that are effective. You must act immediately. Beetles can devastate a garden in a matter of days.
Reb
Welcome to the war on bugs.

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Fri May 19, 2017 5:10 am


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Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 19, 2017 rebnavy1862 0

What kind of beetles? You can use Sevin dust or spray. Bonide makes organic sprays that are effective. You must act immediately. Beetles can devastate a garden in a matter of days.
Reb
Welcome to the war on bugs.

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Fri May 19, 2017 5:10 am


:tank:

Gardening • Re: Beetle attacks

May 19, 2017 rebnavy1862 0

What kind of beetles? You can use Sevin dust or spray. Bonide makes organic sprays that are effective. You must act immediately. Beetles can devastate a garden in a matter of days.
Reb
Welcome to the war on bugs.

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Fri May 19, 2017 5:10 am


How Does Your Garden Grow? Sunlight, Water, and Some Technology

May 16, 2017 Adam Torkildson 0

In theory, growing a garden seems like the easiest thing in the world to do. Just sow some seeds, make sure the seedlings get plenty of water and sunlight, and in a few months (or less) you’ll have a bountiful harvest of fresh produce. Of course, anyone who has ever grown a garden knows that […]

The post How Does Your Garden Grow? Sunlight, Water, and Some Technology appeared first on American Preppers Network.

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Gardening • Re: Growing tobacco

May 12, 2017 ajax727 0

Well heck , the seeds i spoke about are no good . i have tried several time but they must be to old , over twenty years old and not stored correctly .

Statistics: Posted by ajax727 — Fri May 12, 2017 7:32 am


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Gardening • Re: Organic pest repellents?

May 1, 2017 charlie23 0
RVAprepper2319 wrote:
Our garden is starting Pre purchase pest inspection to have problems with bugs and pests and such and My wife doesnt want to use any chemical commercial pesticides.

Does anyone have any tips for keeping bugs off or killing them organically? I’ve looked through a couple stores and didnt really find much.

Thanks! :D

Hello RVAprepper2319,

Make sure you really have bed bugs, not fleas, ticks or other insects.Don’t panic!
It can be difficult to eliminate bed bugs, but it’s not impossible. Don’t throw out all of your things because most of them can be treated and saved. Throwing stuff out is expensive, may spread the bed bugs to other people’s homes and could cause more stress.
Think through your treatment options. Don’t immediately reach for the spray can.
Reduce the number of hiding places Clean up the clutter.

Statistics: Posted by charlie23 — Mon May 01, 2017 6:21 am


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Sustainable Gardening Systems!

April 27, 2017 gman 0

Sustainable Gardening Systems James Walton “I Am Liberty” Audio in player below! Is there anything like eating out of your backyard? I don’t know about you but when I get the change to look out back and see beds of kale, chard, beets and spinach growing tall I am so satisfied. Just having access to … Continue reading Sustainable Gardening Systems!

The post Sustainable Gardening Systems! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Why You Should Plant Fruit This Year!

April 19, 2017 gman 0

Why You Should Plant Fruit This Year On the Homestead Austin Martin “Homesteady Live“ Audio in player below! Going on 6 years of homesteading, I have learned some big lessons. Don’t get goats. Infrastructure is king. Don’t buy livestock on craigslist. But of all the lessons learned, one of the biggest regrets I have… Spending … Continue reading Why You Should Plant Fruit This Year!

The post Why You Should Plant Fruit This Year! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

Fertilizers, feeding your plants!

April 12, 2017 gman 0

Fertilizers, feeding your plants! Bobby “MHP Gardener” Audio in player below! Before you plant a seed or seedling, you need to apply some fertilizer to the soil or container. What kind and how much depends on what you’re growing, and your particular style of growing. So it’s important to have a good understanding of the … Continue reading Fertilizers, feeding your plants!

The post Fertilizers, feeding your plants! appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 11, 2017 ajax727 0

I skip the jiffy pots and just use stryo coffee cups in trays , i fill them about 2/3 full so i can add soil as the grow . No lights but use cold frame 6×8 with 12 inch side with a plastic covering . I use a liquid fertilizer in the water but at low rate , I poke one big hole in the bottom for the roots , so as not to damage them when I transplant.
My tomato plants are 12 to 14 tall and bushing out . Hoping for a good crop of tomatoes this year .

Statistics: Posted by ajax727 — Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:44 pm


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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 11, 2017 ajax727 0

I skip the jiffy pots and just use stryo coffee cups in trays , i fill them about 2/3 full so i can add soil as the grow . No lights but use cold frame 6×8 with 12 inch side with a plastic covering . I use a liquid fertilizer in the water but at low rate , I poke one big hole in the bottom for the roots , so as not to damage them when I transplant.
My tomato plants are 12 to 14 tall and bushing out . Hoping for a good crop of tomatoes this year .

Statistics: Posted by ajax727 — Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:44 pm


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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 11, 2017 oldasrocks 0

I raise all my own tomato and pepper plants. Keep the grow light on 24/7 and one inch about the plants. When they are brushing the light raise it an inch. i use Jiffy pots also. After they get about 2 inches tall I transfer them into Styrofoam coffee cups with Miracle Grow soil. Same distance with the light till they get at least 6 inches tall. Don’t forget to poke holes in the bottom of the coffee cup.
Just fill the cup 1/2 full of soil. set the Jiffy pot in the middle and fill around it and up. Then I set them in plastic trays and let them suck water from the bottom. As they grow a little bigger I put a little house plant fertilizer in the water.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon Apr 10, 2017 7:59 pm


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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 11, 2017 oldasrocks 0

I raise all my own tomato and pepper plants. Keep the grow light on 24/7 and one inch about the plants. When they are brushing the light raise it an inch. i use Jiffy pots also. After they get about 2 inches tall I transfer them into Styrofoam coffee cups with Miracle Grow soil. Same distance with the light till they get at least 6 inches tall. Don’t forget to poke holes in the bottom of the coffee cup.
Just fill the cup 1/2 full of soil. set the Jiffy pot in the middle and fill around it and up. Then I set them in plastic trays and let them suck water from the bottom. As they grow a little bigger I put a little house plant fertilizer in the water.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon Apr 10, 2017 7:59 pm


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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 10, 2017 anita 0

I have had a similar problem with them getting spindly when I grow inside. Last year I transplanted outdoors in the middle of April (which is taking a big chance in Zone 6B, southeastern PA).They were about an inch or so high. I cut the bottoms off water and vinegar bottles ((1 gal size) and put them over the plants in my raised beds. If it got cold at night, I closed the cap on top, and it created a little greenhouse. That worked quite well.

In a grid-down situation, I’m going to rely on the tomato plants that volunteer all over my garden, like weeds. I grow heirlooms and the volunteers are just as productive as the regular plants. I can’t vouch for their parentage, but if I am desperate for food, I doubt I’ll care much.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:56 am


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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 10, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Sounds like you may be watering them too much. Once the seeds sprout and push up out of the soil you can let the soil dry out and not water every day. The soil should be damp but not soggy so the roots don’t drown. Being indoors there is less evaporation from the soil. I plant seeds in Jiffy-7 peat pods and set them in a covered plastic tray placed next to the wood stove. They don’t need much light to germinate but warm temps will help with germination and as soon as the plants pop through the soil I remove the top and set the tray on the windowsill and cut back the watering to every third day. Works every time. They sell Jiffy-7 tray kits at most gardening outlets and they last for years of re-use.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:37 am


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Gardening • Re: starting tomatoes from seed

April 10, 2017 Stahlrosen 0

Have you tried breezing them? Blowing on them gently, a few times a day, setting up a light fan to just move them a little, or sometimes brushing your hand across them a couple times a day will help. This will stress them a little to strengthen the young stems. The normal air current stress that they would be exposed to if planted outside, they don’t get indoors, so you have to artificially create it. Maybe that will help.

Statistics: Posted by Stahlrosen — Mon Apr 10, 2017 6:37 am


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Gardening • starting tomatoes from seed

April 10, 2017 primer 0

I need some help with a gardening question, I am currently attempting to start tomatoes from seed and as they get about 3 inches tall they become spindly and fall over however I am currently using 2 grow lights apprx. 2 inches above the plants and they are straightening out I have the seed boxes next to a window catching direct sunlight the grow lights are fine but in a grid down situation they will be worthless could I please get some suggestions? thankyou!

Statistics: Posted by primer — Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:49 pm


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Gardening • starting tomatoes from seed

April 10, 2017 primer 0

I need some help with a gardening question, I am currently attempting to start tomatoes from seed and as they get about 3 inches tall they become spindly and fall over however I am currently using 2 grow lights apprx. 2 inches above the plants and they are straightening out I have the seed boxes next to a window catching direct sunlight the grow lights are fine but in a grid down situation they will be worthless could I please get some suggestions? thankyou!

Statistics: Posted by primer — Sun Apr 09, 2017 9:49 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 26, 2017 Pedro wyoming 0

Calcium sulphate/gypsum is a slightly alkaline mineral and has a fairly high solubility rate. It’s primary use in soil is a flocculant that softens clay rich soils. It is also an amphoteric compound that is a buffer. This means that the effect on pH of soil depends on what the starting pH is. A highly alkaline soil will display a lower pH with gyp and will raise the pH of acidic soils. Some of the criteria that should be considered when using gypsum are, calcium:magnesium ratio (should be about 8:1) and total alkalinity (includes carbonate and bicarbonate content). If the calcium content is sufficiently high before application, then the soil will tend to a higher alkaline state inhibiting growth. If the acidity of the soil is due to a high bicarb content, then the gypsum will tend to form calcium carbonate which has very poor bioavailability. In either case, calcium phosphate is usually a better choice both as a buffer and a calcium donor. It also has the additional benefit of providing phosphorus which is a very necessary element for virtually all plant growth. Furthermore, calcium phosphate breaks down slowly so it is difficult to over treat soils to toxicity. Gypsum will tend to form alkali pools where water puddles occur.

I use gyp in water based drilling fluid for some of the reasons listed above and am very familiar with it’s chemical characteristics. If you need more details, PM me.

pW

Statistics: Posted by Pedro wyoming — Sun Mar 26, 2017 1:29 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 26, 2017 arkieready 0

Gypsum
CaSO4•2(H2O)
Help on Composition: Composition:Molecular Weight = 172.17 gm
Calcium 23.28 % Ca 32.57 % CaO
Hydrogen 2.34 % H 20.93 % H2O
Sulfur 18.62 % S 46.50 % SO3
Oxygen 55.76 % O
I just cut and pasted this. It’s the mineral gypsum.

First hand observation, friend had a garden in what looked to me like a rock pile, or old creek bed. He was a drywaller by trade and had TONS of scrap he tilled into his patch. They grew beautiful corn, beans and taters.
Gardenweb/forums has a discussion of pros and cons of Sheetrock in the garden.
I wonder how it would work in my very acidic, mucky clay silt. If it would lighten the structure or just glue it together. I have access to scraps.

Statistics: Posted by arkieready — Sun Mar 26, 2017 9:00 am


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 theoutback 0

Veggies and fruit trees will need more neutral soil then is likely there, between 6-7. So the ph will most likely need to be raised not
lowered. Ideally apples, peaches and pears between 6.3-6.8. Most veggies too.

Berries do need more acidic soil, raspberries and strawberries slightly lower than fruit, around 5.8-6.5, but blueberries require very low soil PH, about 4.0-5.3

I would assume the PH is low from what you described,but wood ash will raise it some. However for best results, test soil and amend for the crops you are going to grow. You can use a store bought meter, however I would really recommend contacting your local extension service. They will not only tell you PH and nutrient needs , but give you recommendations for amending. Keep in mind soil amendments take time. PH can take up to 6 months to raise or lower depending on soil and type of lime being used, so get started asap!

P.S. I am a commercial apple grower and would be happy to answer any questions regarding them in particular.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Fri Mar 24, 2017 3:25 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 sageprice 0

While chemically getting the PH correct does only a little to correct soil fertility. There are several sites about “reclaiming depleted soil”, almost all of them rely on green fertilizer (cover crops tilled back in). The fact that there is plenty of minerals from ash (see “slash and burn agriculture”) means that there is only a little to be added.

Statistics: Posted by sageprice — Fri Mar 24, 2017 12:18 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
Fullmoon wrote:
OK for you scientific types, I was talking to a corn farmer at my Battalion re-union and he told me he had to apply gypsum to his soil to get the correct ph for corn. I think he was from the state of Nebraska. I had never heard of this before, lived all over the country and don’t remember anyone applying gypsum. Which way does gyp move the ph?

Up. Here in Virginia, corn farmers apply lime in early Spring before planting.
Reb

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Fri Mar 24, 2017 7:03 am


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 Fullmoon 0

OK for you scientific types, I was talking to a corn farmer at my Battalion re-union and he told me he had to apply gypsum to his soil to get the correct ph for corn. I think he was from the state of Nebraska. I had never heard of this before, lived all over the country and don’t remember anyone applying gypsum. Which way does gyp move the ph?

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Thu Mar 23, 2017 10:30 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 Fullmoon 0

OK for you scientific types, I was talking to a corn farmer at my Battalion re-union and he told me he had to apply gypsum to his soil to get the correct ph for corn. I think he was from the state of Nebraska. I had never heard of this before, lived all over the country and don’t remember anyone applying gypsum. Which way does gyp move the ph?

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Thu Mar 23, 2017 10:30 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
IceFire wrote:
Lime will RAISE the pH, while sulfur will lower it. Used coffee grounds are great mulch/soil amendment for plants that like acidic condition. You can frequently get used grounds from coffee shops and restaurants. As much as I hate Starbucks, they are great about saving up their used coffee grounds for people…saves them disposal costs, plus it helps with their environmental/social responsibility “creds.”

I’ve planted blackberries, raspberries, and boysenberries in alkaline soil…it did NOT bother them. In fact, they immediately tried to take over the entire area!.

I’ve gotten tons of used grounds from Starbucks. Never, ever, bought a thing there. I get a perverted kick out of carrying concealed while taking out their garbage.
Reb
And they wonder why I am smiling

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:07 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 IceFire 0

Lime will RAISE the pH, while sulfur will lower it. Used coffee grounds are great mulch/soil amendment for plants that like acidic condition. You can frequently get used grounds from coffee shops and restaurants. As much as I hate Starbucks, they are great about saving up their used coffee grounds for people…saves them disposal costs, plus it helps with their environmental/social responsibility “creds.”

I’ve planted blackberries, raspberries, and boysenberries in alkaline soil…it did NOT bother them. In fact, they immediately tried to take over the entire area!.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:43 pm