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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 26, 2017 Pedro wyoming 0

Calcium sulphate/gypsum is a slightly alkaline mineral and has a fairly high solubility rate. It’s primary use in soil is a flocculant that softens clay rich soils. It is also an amphoteric compound that is a buffer. This means that the effect on pH of soil depends on what the starting pH is. A highly alkaline soil will display a lower pH with gyp and will raise the pH of acidic soils. Some of the criteria that should be considered when using gypsum are, calcium:magnesium ratio (should be about 8:1) and total alkalinity (includes carbonate and bicarbonate content). If the calcium content is sufficiently high before application, then the soil will tend to a higher alkaline state inhibiting growth. If the acidity of the soil is due to a high bicarb content, then the gypsum will tend to form calcium carbonate which has very poor bioavailability. In either case, calcium phosphate is usually a better choice both as a buffer and a calcium donor. It also has the additional benefit of providing phosphorus which is a very necessary element for virtually all plant growth. Furthermore, calcium phosphate breaks down slowly so it is difficult to over treat soils to toxicity. Gypsum will tend to form alkali pools where water puddles occur.

I use gyp in water based drilling fluid for some of the reasons listed above and am very familiar with it’s chemical characteristics. If you need more details, PM me.

pW

Statistics: Posted by Pedro wyoming — Sun Mar 26, 2017 1:29 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 26, 2017 arkieready 0

Gypsum
CaSO4•2(H2O)
Help on Composition: Composition:Molecular Weight = 172.17 gm
Calcium 23.28 % Ca 32.57 % CaO
Hydrogen 2.34 % H 20.93 % H2O
Sulfur 18.62 % S 46.50 % SO3
Oxygen 55.76 % O
I just cut and pasted this. It’s the mineral gypsum.

First hand observation, friend had a garden in what looked to me like a rock pile, or old creek bed. He was a drywaller by trade and had TONS of scrap he tilled into his patch. They grew beautiful corn, beans and taters.
Gardenweb/forums has a discussion of pros and cons of Sheetrock in the garden.
I wonder how it would work in my very acidic, mucky clay silt. If it would lighten the structure or just glue it together. I have access to scraps.

Statistics: Posted by arkieready — Sun Mar 26, 2017 9:00 am


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 theoutback 0

Veggies and fruit trees will need more neutral soil then is likely there, between 6-7. So the ph will most likely need to be raised not
lowered. Ideally apples, peaches and pears between 6.3-6.8. Most veggies too.

Berries do need more acidic soil, raspberries and strawberries slightly lower than fruit, around 5.8-6.5, but blueberries require very low soil PH, about 4.0-5.3

I would assume the PH is low from what you described,but wood ash will raise it some. However for best results, test soil and amend for the crops you are going to grow. You can use a store bought meter, however I would really recommend contacting your local extension service. They will not only tell you PH and nutrient needs , but give you recommendations for amending. Keep in mind soil amendments take time. PH can take up to 6 months to raise or lower depending on soil and type of lime being used, so get started asap!

P.S. I am a commercial apple grower and would be happy to answer any questions regarding them in particular.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Fri Mar 24, 2017 3:25 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 sageprice 0

While chemically getting the PH correct does only a little to correct soil fertility. There are several sites about “reclaiming depleted soil”, almost all of them rely on green fertilizer (cover crops tilled back in). The fact that there is plenty of minerals from ash (see “slash and burn agriculture”) means that there is only a little to be added.

Statistics: Posted by sageprice — Fri Mar 24, 2017 12:18 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
Fullmoon wrote:
OK for you scientific types, I was talking to a corn farmer at my Battalion re-union and he told me he had to apply gypsum to his soil to get the correct ph for corn. I think he was from the state of Nebraska. I had never heard of this before, lived all over the country and don’t remember anyone applying gypsum. Which way does gyp move the ph?

Up. Here in Virginia, corn farmers apply lime in early Spring before planting.
Reb

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Fri Mar 24, 2017 7:03 am


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 Fullmoon 0

OK for you scientific types, I was talking to a corn farmer at my Battalion re-union and he told me he had to apply gypsum to his soil to get the correct ph for corn. I think he was from the state of Nebraska. I had never heard of this before, lived all over the country and don’t remember anyone applying gypsum. Which way does gyp move the ph?

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Thu Mar 23, 2017 10:30 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 Fullmoon 0

OK for you scientific types, I was talking to a corn farmer at my Battalion re-union and he told me he had to apply gypsum to his soil to get the correct ph for corn. I think he was from the state of Nebraska. I had never heard of this before, lived all over the country and don’t remember anyone applying gypsum. Which way does gyp move the ph?

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Thu Mar 23, 2017 10:30 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
IceFire wrote:
Lime will RAISE the pH, while sulfur will lower it. Used coffee grounds are great mulch/soil amendment for plants that like acidic condition. You can frequently get used grounds from coffee shops and restaurants. As much as I hate Starbucks, they are great about saving up their used coffee grounds for people…saves them disposal costs, plus it helps with their environmental/social responsibility “creds.”

I’ve planted blackberries, raspberries, and boysenberries in alkaline soil…it did NOT bother them. In fact, they immediately tried to take over the entire area!.

I’ve gotten tons of used grounds from Starbucks. Never, ever, bought a thing there. I get a perverted kick out of carrying concealed while taking out their garbage.
Reb
And they wonder why I am smiling

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:07 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 24, 2017 IceFire 0

Lime will RAISE the pH, while sulfur will lower it. Used coffee grounds are great mulch/soil amendment for plants that like acidic condition. You can frequently get used grounds from coffee shops and restaurants. As much as I hate Starbucks, they are great about saving up their used coffee grounds for people…saves them disposal costs, plus it helps with their environmental/social responsibility “creds.”

I’ve planted blackberries, raspberries, and boysenberries in alkaline soil…it did NOT bother them. In fact, they immediately tried to take over the entire area!.

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:43 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 23, 2017 rebnavy1862 0
Fullmoon wrote:
Pine, fir and larch trees all love acidic soil and will grow well in it. In any deciduous forest you will find that the soil is acidic. In a hardwood forest the soil is more neutral and vegetable crops will produce well in this soil. To grow veggies or fruit trees in acidic soil you must add dolomite to lower the Ph of the soil. Plants that love acidic soil are blue berries, red raspberries, Himalayan black berries, black satin berries etc. and these can be planted directly in acidic soil without adding lime to lower the ph.

Lime raises the pH, not lower it.
Reb

Statistics: Posted by rebnavy1862 — Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:42 pm


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 23, 2017 bacpacker1513 0

Fullmoon is very accurate about acid soils and what will grow there. Blueberries love it and poduce a large crop after getting established. One veggie that like acid soil that I wasn’t aware of is potatos. They can tolerate it down to 4.5.
Get a soil test done from a lot of areas around your place and see where you are starting at. Then make a plan with facts in hand.

Statistics: Posted by bacpacker1513 — Thu Mar 23, 2017 11:18 am


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 23, 2017 Fullmoon 0

Pine, fir and larch trees all love acidic soil and will grow well in it. In any deciduous forest you will find that the soil is acidic. In a hardwood forest the soil is more neutral and vegetable crops will produce well in this soil. To grow veggies or fruit trees in acidic soil you must add dolomite to lower the Ph of the soil. Plants that love acidic soil are blue berries, red raspberries, Himalayan black berries, black satin berries etc. and these can be planted directly in acidic soil without adding lime to lower the ph.

Statistics: Posted by Fullmoon — Thu Mar 23, 2017 11:02 am


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 Cast Iron 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Does anybody have a few quarts of ambition they can loan me? It’s almost 8;30 am and I’m still sitting her drinking coffee waiting for enough energy to make breakfast. My goal today was to fill the barrels with rocks then dirt for the taters.

Tomorrow I’m picking up a load of steel I ordered for the new gazebo I need to build. Our old one died of old age.

I would Old, but I needed mine to go out to the barn this morning to thaw all the livestock water containers.
It was three degrees this morning.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Mar 23, 2017 9:43 am


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 ReadyMom 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
The one I’m trying next is the simple tomato cage….easy-peasy….you can harvest just like the container project in OP but without all the mess/hassle. (not to take anything away from OP as it’s a great option too…Looks like a fun project)

Google “Potato Tower” and click on “images” at the top of the page for all sorts of ideas for what you already have on hand.

Image

No worries on sharing the alternate idea! I’m looking for easy … as well as something that hubby won’t freak out over. Now, I’m seriously considering trying YOUR idea! So … you use straw INSTEAD of soil?? -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu Mar 23, 2017 9:40 am


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0
IceFire wrote:
Years ago, when we were in PA, I grew potatoes in a couple of 50+ gallon plastic garbage cans that I’d poked a bunch of drain holes into. Filled the bottom 1/4 of the cans with soil, planted the taters, then as they grew, covered the growing plants with leaves and straw. Worked REALLY well, and harvesting was EASY!

This^^^ plus 5000.

The straw medium is one of the easiest/productive for potato’s that I’ve seen…..extremely easy/inexpensive to add and harvest and I think the productivity/yield has a lot to do with spud size as its not fighting to grow in a denser material like dirt.

This works really good even in raised beds.

The one I’m trying next is the simple tomato cage….easy-peasy….you can harvest just like the container project in OP but without all the mess/hassle. (not to take anything away from OP as it’s a great option too…Looks like a fun project)

Google “Potato Tower” and click on “images” at the top of the page for all sorts of ideas for what you already have on hand.

Image

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:51 am


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 oldasrocks 0

Does anybody have a few quarts of ambition they can loan me? It’s almost 8;30 am and I’m still sitting her drinking coffee waiting for enough energy to make breakfast. My goal today was to fill the barrels with rocks then dirt for the taters.

Tomorrow I’m picking up a load of steel I ordered for the new gazebo I need to build. Our old one died of old age.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:31 am


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Gardening • Re: How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 23, 2017 NJMike 0

Not a farmer here, but some random suggestions…

If your focus of effort is mainly the one acre area for fruit trees, I’d suggest getting the soil tested in several spots to see what nutrient amendments are needed.

See if the local agriculture department has guidance. Example online resource:
https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nr … RDB1259629

Do a cost/benefit analysis of investment to yield.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Thu Mar 23, 2017 8:19 am


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Gardening • How to best take advantage of forest fire damage

March 23, 2017 Antihero 0

A forest fire 2 years ago cleared alot of space on my land. Fortunately it only got our trees and a few out buildings but left the house standing. The land was heavily forested with pine fir and larch trees before. Now it’s mostly covered in a plant called mullen and other low growing plants. The soil below the old forest floor is sand clay and small rocks 6 to 8inch rocks. I know there’s going to be a alkaline problem because of the pine trees that burnt. And the only soil place near by only sells fill dirt that comes out of old Alfalfa field. It’s very poor for growing to. We have several acres of newly open land so bringing soil in isn’t really practical anyway. I’d like to get some fruit trees and food plants going at least on a full acer and then maybe some thing half wild like blackberry and raspberrys on the rest of the open land. Any suggestions on how I should treat the soil before I start planting thus year?

Statistics: Posted by Antihero — Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:38 am


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 Cast Iron 0

The other system I have seen is using old tires.
Put one tire down,fill it with dirt and some compost. Then the potatoes, then straw. When the leaves have grown up and through, add another tire with more compost and straw.
Continue until chest height.

Then remove a tire and harvest the ones in that layer.

Do not know if there is any health hazards using old tires or not.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Mar 23, 2017 7:30 am


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 IceFire 0

Years ago, when we were in PA, I grew potatoes in a couple of 50+ gallon plastic garbage cans that I’d poked a bunch of drain holes into. Filled the bottom 1/4 of the cans with soil, planted the taters, then as they grew, covered the growing plants with leaves and straw. Worked REALLY well, and harvesting was EASY!

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:38 pm


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Gardening • Re: Potatoes: Another Container Gardening Idea

March 23, 2017 IceFire 0

Years ago, when we were in PA, I grew potatoes in a couple of 50+ gallon plastic garbage cans that I’d poked a bunch of drain holes into. Filled the bottom 1/4 of the cans with soil, planted the taters, then as they grew, covered the growing plants with leaves and straw. Worked REALLY well, and harvesting was EASY!

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:38 pm


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Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist

March 4, 2017 gman 0

Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist Forrest & Kyle “The Prepping Academy” Audio in player below! The “The Prepping Academy” and talking all things gardening. There’s not a single good reason anyone could give for not building a seed bank. In the eventuality of a grid down scenario, or even unemployment, a seed bank could be life saving. … Continue reading Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist

The post Gardening for Preppers and Survivalist appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 27, 2017 Northern Freeman 0
Illini Warrior wrote:

Northern Freeman wrote:

Illini Warrior wrote:nobody knows the best gardening stock for your area than the local regional nurseries ….

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/

put in our zip code and start your research thru catalog requests …

Up here in Northern Minnesota, I have found many of the local regional nurseries don’t care about the growing zone. Be careful of what you buy and just read label’s and do some research and talk to other locals. If there is a dollar to be made never put absolute trust in the people making that dollar.

then they aren’t much of a nursery and won’t stay in biz very long – who buys twice from a source that don’t know their own biz? ….

There is not much of a selection of local nurseries in the area. This area is a Zone 3 with a small area of Zone 2. The University of Minnesota is constantly working on fruit trees and such to grow in this area and some do good. But the few nursery’s do stock zone 4 and 5 items to sell you. Some winters are harsher than others and during the mild winters you will get some of them to grow, only to be winter killed during the harsher winters. If you don’t think people will sell you stuff that , never mind.

Statistics: Posted by Northern Freeman — Mon Feb 27, 2017 4:33 am


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Gardening • Re: Less than legal plants

February 26, 2017 RayMac1963 0

SHTF the LAST thing you want to be is impaired in any way shape or form. Alcohol, drugs, pot, whatever… Yeah, some people are going to have a hard time dealing with the stress. But it will be “deal with it and adapt, or dig a hole”.

Statistics: Posted by RayMac1963 — Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:45 pm


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Gardening • Re: Less than legal plants

February 26, 2017 RayMac1963 0

SHTF the LAST thing you want to be is impaired in any way shape or form. Alcohol, drugs, pot, whatever… Yeah, some people are going to have a hard time dealing with the stress. But it will be “deal with it and adapt, or dig a hole”.

Statistics: Posted by RayMac1963 — Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:45 pm


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Gardening • Re: Less than legal plants

February 26, 2017 daaswampman 0

Why! Could it be that I would want myself and my crew – Awake, Alert and Oriented? Try having an intelligent conversation with someone smoking or drinking while stone cold sober! I have no moral issues against pot, alcohol, or any other drug, but I don’t see the need. I enjoy being alive and aware of the world around me and have no interest in being less than I am. The most limited resource any of us have is time, why would I waste it altered? Perhaps I would change my mind, if I became weak or sickly. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:16 pm


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Gardening • Re: Less than legal plants

February 26, 2017 daaswampman 0

Why! Could it be that I would want myself and my crew – Awake, Alert and Oriented? Try having an intelligent conversation with someone smoking or drinking while stone cold sober! I have no moral issues against pot, alcohol, or any other drug, but I don’t see the need. I enjoy being alive and aware of the world around me and have no interest in being less than I am. The most limited resource any of us have is time, why would I waste it altered? Perhaps I would change my mind, if I became weak or sickly. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Sun Feb 26, 2017 6:16 pm


:oops:

Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 anita 0

I think there’s a difference between buying from a local grower/nursery and buying from a garden center-type nursery. When I buy fruit trees etc, I try to get them from a relatively local grower, so that the climate is similar. What grows well for them has a reasonable chance to grow well for me. (at least more so than something grown in Fla or TX.) The local garden centers get their plant material from all over. They are basically resellers of plant material.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:36 pm


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Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 anita 0

I think there’s a difference between buying from a local grower/nursery and buying from a garden center-type nursery. When I buy fruit trees etc, I try to get them from a relatively local grower, so that the climate is similar. What grows well for them has a reasonable chance to grow well for me. (at least more so than something grown in Fla or TX.) The local garden centers get their plant material from all over. They are basically resellers of plant material.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:36 pm


:oops:

Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
Northern Freeman wrote:

Illini Warrior wrote:nobody knows the best gardening stock for your area than the local regional nurseries ….

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/

put in our zip code and start your research thru catalog requests …

Up here in Northern Minnesota, I have found many of the local regional nurseries don’t care about the growing zone. Be careful of what you buy and just read label’s and do some research and talk to other locals. If there is a dollar to be made never put absolute trust in the people making that dollar.

then they aren’t much of a nursery and won’t stay in biz very long – who buys twice from a source that don’t know their own biz? ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:16 pm


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Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 Illini Warrior 0
Northern Freeman wrote:

Illini Warrior wrote:nobody knows the best gardening stock for your area than the local regional nurseries ….

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/

put in our zip code and start your research thru catalog requests …

Up here in Northern Minnesota, I have found many of the local regional nurseries don’t care about the growing zone. Be careful of what you buy and just read label’s and do some research and talk to other locals. If there is a dollar to be made never put absolute trust in the people making that dollar.

then they aren’t much of a nursery and won’t stay in biz very long – who buys twice from a source that don’t know their own biz? ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:16 pm


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Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 anita 0

I’m in PA, Zone 6b, and can grow peanuts and sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes are great, I think a key prepper crop, because they store all winter long, no problem. I gave my brother some slips, and he was able to successfully grow sweet potatoes north of Pittsburgh, PA, Zone 5b. His didn’t get to be football sized, as some of mine did, but they were still successful.

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:24 pm


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Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0

Not knowing your exact location, you’re anywhere from Zone 5b-7b.

Determine where you are and choose plants accordingly..

zone map….. http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/

Then determine what you want to grow there…. here is Oroville as an example…..(Zone 5)… http://www.ufseeds.com/Zone-5-Planting-Calendar.html

here’s a great list for your zones also…(scroll down in the link) http://www.livingoffgridguide.com/gardening/fruit-nut-trees/ ….and yes, paw-paw is there. ;)

I know you probably already know this and are just looking for extra input here, but educated experimentation will be the only real way to find success outside the established norms…. good luck! :thumbup:

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:52 pm


:oops:

Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 anita 0

I’d check out your growing zone and start small. Try a few of various things. Those that do well–plant more.

I think it’s too easy to start big and get overwhelmed, then be demoralized if something fails, or if you can’t keep up with everything.

A few years ago someone posted a clip (I think it was on APN) of some woman who had purchased a large property with her husband. They must have had so much money they didn’t know what to do with it all. They were fencing the entire thing, automatic gate, bulldozers clearing brush, backhoes digging hugelmounds, Every type of fruit and nut tree being planted, house being built, goats, and on and on.

I often wonder what happened to her…

Statistics: Posted by anita — Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:37 pm


:oops:

Gardening • Re: Farming north of the 49 parallel?

February 26, 2017 Northern Freeman 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
nobody knows the best gardening stock for your area than the local regional nurseries ….

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/

put in our zip code and start your research thru catalog requests …

Up here in Northern Minnesota, I have found many of the local regional nurseries don’t care about the growing zone. Be careful of what you buy and just read label’s and do some research and talk to other locals. If there is a dollar to be made never put absolute trust in the people making that dollar.

Statistics: Posted by Northern Freeman — Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:59 am