No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 19, 2017 Defcon09 0
orangetom1999 wrote:

Vetmike wrote:All well and good but remember that anything you transmit can be picked up by anybody with the right equipment. There was entity called the Army Security Agency and it had the capability to listen in on any sort of electronic emission as well as DFing it. Per FCC regulations, it is illegal for you to encode or otherwise conceal your message so using something like PGP or any other cryptography is illegal. It is also illegal to use brevity codes (eg 6256 means ‘met at Sam’s Place’)
The safest way to use any form of communication is to always act as if someone was listening to your every word. So don’t broadcast: “Joe, you and your convoy meet us at the intersection of Highways 90 and 15 and we’ll go on to the bug out site.” cause someone with illintent will be waiting for you.

I am going to call BS on this one VetMike…. not out of disrespect but with great respect.

…………………….In a SHTF or TEEOTWAWKI…all that legal and illegal stuff goes right out the window. True enough about being monitored or DF’d. I understand that.

I have to agree with you also OT on this one. In a event the Feds/GOV, etc. will be falling all over themselves when it hits. Weak signal comms will be put on the back burner and as for the evil do’ers listening, we have ways of confusing them. Anyways, for us who should prepare before it hits, get the gang together and develope your own “smoke signals”, if ya know what I mean.

Statistics: Posted by Defcon09 — Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:18 pm


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 19, 2017 Defcon09 0
orangetom1999 wrote:

Vetmike wrote:All well and good but remember that anything you transmit can be picked up by anybody with the right equipment. There was entity called the Army Security Agency and it had the capability to listen in on any sort of electronic emission as well as DFing it. Per FCC regulations, it is illegal for you to encode or otherwise conceal your message so using something like PGP or any other cryptography is illegal. It is also illegal to use brevity codes (eg 6256 means ‘met at Sam’s Place’)
The safest way to use any form of communication is to always act as if someone was listening to your every word. So don’t broadcast: “Joe, you and your convoy meet us at the intersection of Highways 90 and 15 and we’ll go on to the bug out site.” cause someone with illintent will be waiting for you.

I am going to call BS on this one VetMike…. not out of disrespect but with great respect.

…………………….In a SHTF or TEEOTWAWKI…all that legal and illegal stuff goes right out the window. True enough about being monitored or DF’d. I understand that.

I have to agree with you also OT on this one. In a event the Feds/GOV, etc. will be falling all over themselves when it hits. Weak signal comms will be put on the back burner and as for the evil do’ers listening, we have ways of confusing them. Anyways, for us who should prepare before it hits, get the gang together and develope your own “smoke signals”, if ya know what I mean.

Statistics: Posted by Defcon09 — Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:18 pm


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 19, 2017 orangetom1999 0
Vetmike wrote:
All well and good but remember that anything you transmit can be picked up by anybody with the right equipment. There was entity called the Army Security Agency and it had the capability to listen in on any sort of electronic emission as well as DFing it. Per FCC regulations, it is illegal for you to encode or otherwise conceal your message so using something like PGP or any other cryptography is illegal. It is also illegal to use brevity codes (eg 6256 means ‘met at Sam’s Place’)
The safest way to use any form of communication is to always act as if someone was listening to your every word. So don’t broadcast: “Joe, you and your convoy meet us at the intersection of Highways 90 and 15 and we’ll go on to the bug out site.” cause someone with illintent will be waiting for you.

I am going to call BS on this one VetMike…. not out of disrespect but with great respect.

I so state because for those who know …there applies a certain amount of “OPSEC” on many things we do and in which we are interested in as preppers.

How much OPSEC is up to the individuals themselves.

There is another aspect to Preppers and thinkers which is not often spoken about …and that is that Preppers as a whole do not like or want to be
“herded” in with the rest of the two legged wildlife….in anything to do with prepping or SHTF…TEOTWAWKI. We will make up our own mind and conduct ourselves accordingly.

Now governments…and what I call…government “whoredom” is exactly the opposite. Governments tend towards constantly “Herding” people while they themselves work to a different tune and standard. History is replete with this evidence and or tale. One size fits all…except for them…government.
This is done by constantly “Herding People.” Crisis management…dissonance…manufacturing a bad guy on which to focus publically manufactured wrath. Fear and insecurity techniques through whoring out the media to control peoples fears and insecurities.

We are talking here in the extreme about survival..not necessarily legal or illegal.

I know sufficient to understand certain aspects of government as “whoredom” ..institutional whoredom in good times or bad. The real read of history indicates that government will barter, sell, or trade anyone’s soul to keep and maintain power and control….full scale insecurity.

We have been told by our founders never to trust government…by binding them with the Chains of the Constitution.

In a SHTF or TEEOTWAWKI…all that legal and illegal stuff goes right out the window. True enough about being monitored or DF’d. I understand that.

I just wanted to put a certain perspective on that..with respect to your position about being monitored and DF’d.

I have been told by certain Olde Timers ..that the safest manner of secure communications is a light and morse code…at night. However that has severe line of sight limitations. But radio..yes…it can be monitored.

We have experimented here with home made horizontal directional antennas…for covering long distances using horizontal polarity and it works well but is not entirely monitor proof.

Thanks,
Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:30 am


:offtopic:

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 18, 2017 Vetmike 0

All well and good but remember that anything you transmit can be picked up by anybody with the right equipment. There was entity called the Army Security Agency and it had the capability to listen in on any sort of electronic emission as well as DFing it. Per FCC regulations, it is illegal for you to encode or otherwise conceal your message so using something like PGP or any other cryptography is illegal. It is also illegal to use brevity codes (eg 6256 means ‘met at Sam’s Place’)
The safest way to use any form of communication is to always act as if someone was listening to your every word. So don’t broadcast: “Joe, you and your convoy meet us at the intersection of Highways 90 and 15 and we’ll go on to the bug out site.” cause someone with illintent will be waiting for you.

Statistics: Posted by Vetmike — Mon Sep 18, 2017 11:01 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Zello.com — emergency walkie talkie on cell phone

September 18, 2017 FLgator 0

During hurricane Irma, I was able to communicate with family that was in an area with absolutely no electricity for a week using an old fashioned touch-tone telephone. They draw their power from the phone lines rather than the power lines.
Not everyone has a cell phone, especially the elderly. And even cell towers have a limited supply of back up power.

Statistics: Posted by FLgator — Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:04 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Zello.com — emergency walkie talkie on cell phone

September 18, 2017 FLgator 0

During hurricane Irma, I was able to communicate with family that was in an area with absolutely no electricity for a week using an old fashioned touch-tone telephone. They draw their power from the phone lines rather than the power lines.
Not everyone has a cell phone, especially the elderly. And even cell towers have a limited supply of back up power.

Statistics: Posted by FLgator — Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:04 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 17, 2017 orangetom1999 0

Very interesting post WillProspector,

I have never used these frequencies…for which you have listed here in the MURS band.

151.820 MHz
151.880 MHz
151.940 MHz
154.570 MHz
154.600 MHz

I did, however, plug these frequencies into my Baofeng BF F8HP walkie talkie and they work fine as I cross checked between two of the BF F8P radios. Both of them transmit and receive fine on these frequencies.

What I have done is to program the FRS/GMRS frequencies from storage space 106 to 127 with these GMRS/FRS frequencies.

I am now considering also manually programming into these five MURS frequencies From 100 to 105 storage space/channel.

The limitation of these rigs is that they are FM line of sight transmission. The VHF bands will occasionally go long or “skip/DX” as the term is used..but not for very long and it is not a good thing to count on this for help.

I personally like VHF frequencies and often hook up with my friend across the river wherein we switch to the lower end of the 2 meter ham band to work SSB modes.

But these Baofeng radios put out a bit more power than does the MURS type radios. I do not concern myself about that as Mostly I monitor the FRS/GMRS frequencies and soon the MURS Frequencies as well.

You have me thinking also about putting these frequencies into my VHF/UHF rig which is a Wouxan UV920 p radio.

https://www.amazon.com/Wouxun-KG-UV920P … Fvhf+radio

I ve not used this radio in some time now ..opting instead for using my Icom 706 MK II and also my Yaesu FT 890.

Both this Icom and Yaesu radio have been modified to transmit straight through all the bands including the CB bands. I particularly wanted the CB bands accessable in all the modes available on these radios.

But I have never considered the MURS bands …but now that you have provided the frequencies I will program them accordingly. Mostly I will monitor them as do I also on the GMRS/FRS frequencies. Here locally the GMRS frequencies seem want to be used by the schools and also some Hotels and olde folks homes.

I have built my own J pole antennas to use on the VHF/UHF frequencies and they work fine. Also I have the adapters for these walkie talkies that I can hook them up to a dual band magnetic base mobile antenna in my cars, truck, and van. This works out fine verses a full sized VHF/UHF Mobile radio.

Nonetheless …thanks for the frequencies. I did not know that information’s prior to your post.

A very 73 to you and your house,

Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Sun Sep 17, 2017 9:18 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Zello.com — emergency walkie talkie on cell phone

September 6, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Just finding out about this App available on your cell phone! I’m setting up a channel for our family. You can set up multiple channels. The mom’s facebook page that I’m on set one up, as well. Should we set one up for APN? The APN channel would be used just for emergencies. Let me know if interested. Here’s the info:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/zello-w … 31856?mt=8

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed Sep 06, 2017 11:40 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 5, 2017 WillProspector 0
Punisher1336 wrote:
CB is very limited. But using it to monitor the emergency channel 9 is something to consider. But CB would be low on my priority list. Initially I started with GRMS, quickly evolved to HAM using Bao Fengs, which I consider glorified CBs. Just upgraded to Yaesu 857d and have a lot of antenna options to acquire before I consider picking up a CB which I don’t see integrating in my comms plan.

I suggest everyone reads this article: http://www.itstactical.com/digicom/comm … unication/

“License free, low cost, two-way communication. What’s not to love about MURS? MURS stands for Multi User Radio Service, and is one of the best kept secrets in personal and family radio communications.

Formerly available only for business communications, the FCC has kept five MURS frequencies license-free and open for public use since 2000. Handheld radios broadcasting on MURS frequencies can experience a range of two miles to eight miles depending on terrain and obstructions, while MURS Base Stations can reach up to 20 miles.

The stipulations for MURS use provided by the FCC restrict any transmitter in excess of two watts, but any type of antenna is allowed as long as the tower height (with antenna) is no greater than 60 feet high. All communications must also yield to any emergency communication on the same channel.
Frequencies

The five MURS frequencies are listed below, The 154 MHz channels can be operated on the standard 25 kHz wide band or narrow band mode. The 151 MHz channels can only be operated in narrow band mode.

151.820 MHz
151.880 MHz
151.940 MHz
154.570 MHz
154.600 MHz

Each of the five frequencies can not only transmit voice, but also data. The best example of this are the driveway alarms which transmit a signal via MURS when the IR sensor is tripped.
Can you hear me now?

Another hidden benefit of MURS frequencies are the PL codes (Private Line codes) or CTCSS (Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System) which are sub-audible tones that allow users to operate on the same channel without hearing chatter directed to other users.

There are 38 PL codes available to each of the five MURS frequencies, which makes for a combination of 190 different MURS channels. While this is not encryption, anyone not operating with the same PL code won’t hear your conversation.
How MURS stacks up

Most everyone has seen the small hand-held walkie-talkies that operate on the FRS (Family Radio Service), the best example of this are the small Motorola Talkabout Radios marketed towards family communication.

Here are some great comparisons courtesy of PRSG.

Compared with FRS (Family Radio Service) at 460 MHz:

MURS (at 150 MHz) permits four times more power (2 Watts TPO instead the 0.500 Watts ERP limit for FRS).
At MURS frequencies, signals bend over hills better, but FRS signals are better at bouncing off of surfaces and penetrating into/escaping out of buildings.
You may connect a MURS radio to an external or exterior antenna. FRS radios must employ a non-detachable antenna. For vehicle-to-vehicle operation with external (roof-mount) antennas, MURS should provide three to ten (or more) times the range possible with FRS radios.

Compared with GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service) at 460 MHz:

GMRS handheld radios have typically two to five watts transmitter power. GMRS vehicular units transmit typically with ten to 50 watts. There is no limit on the ERP of GMRS stations operating on the primary channels. GMRS stations may transmit with no more the 5 Watts ERP on the seven “interstitial” frequencies (those shared with the FRS).
GMRS operation requires an FCC license.
At MURS frequencies, signals bend over hills better, but GMRS signals are better at bouncing off of surfaces and penetrating into/escaping out of buildings.
For vehicle-to-vehicle operation with external (roof-mount) antennas, MURS should provide one-and-a-half to four times the range possible with GMRS handheld radios also connected to roof-mount antennas. Depending on the surrounding terrain, MURS units connected to roof-mounted antennas might even outperform full-power (50 watt) GMRS mobile units, although the GMRS units should have a greater range in open terrain.
Many GMRS radios can communicate through repeater stations for extended range (typically up to twenty miles or more, sometimes much more). The new FCC Rules will prohibit repeaters in MURS.

Compared with CB (Citizens Band Radio) at 27 MHz:

CB radios may transmit with more power than MURS units may, but communications range is highly dependent on channel congestion and atmospheric conditions. CB communications can also be significantly degraded by noise from vehicle ignition systems and from other man-made sources.
CB signals bend over hills and around obstacles much better than MURS (at 150 MHz) or FRS/GMRS (at 460 MHz) signals.
Vehicle-to-vehicle MURS communications will probably be comparable and possibly quite superior to that available in the CB service.
MURS communications will not suffer from the kind of long-range “skip” interference frequently encountered on CB radio at 27 MHz.

Keep in mind on all these comparisons that MURS has it’s benefits, but GMRS requires an FCC license to operate on.
Where to buy?

MURS radios can now be commonly found online at retailers such as Amazon.com and are starting to increase in popularity as more people find out what they’re missing. The great thing about MURS frequencies is that they can be programmed (with or without PL codes) into existing radios which can be a backup to licensed communication. A dedicated MURS radio also makes a good backup radio if your primary means of communication go down.”

Statistics: Posted by WillProspector — Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:33 pm


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

September 5, 2017 WillProspector 0
Punisher1336 wrote:
CB is very limited. But using it to monitor the emergency channel 9 is something to consider. But CB would be low on my priority list. Initially I started with GRMS, quickly evolved to HAM using Bao Fengs, which I consider glorified CBs. Just upgraded to Yaesu 857d and have a lot of antenna options to acquire before I consider picking up a CB which I don’t see integrating in my comms plan.

I suggest everyone reads this article: http://www.itstactical.com/digicom/comm … unication/

“License free, low cost, two-way communication. What’s not to love about MURS? MURS stands for Multi User Radio Service, and is one of the best kept secrets in personal and family radio communications.

Formerly available only for business communications, the FCC has kept five MURS frequencies license-free and open for public use since 2000. Handheld radios broadcasting on MURS frequencies can experience a range of two miles to eight miles depending on terrain and obstructions, while MURS Base Stations can reach up to 20 miles.

The stipulations for MURS use provided by the FCC restrict any transmitter in excess of two watts, but any type of antenna is allowed as long as the tower height (with antenna) is no greater than 60 feet high. All communications must also yield to any emergency communication on the same channel.
Frequencies

The five MURS frequencies are listed below, The 154 MHz channels can be operated on the standard 25 kHz wide band or narrow band mode. The 151 MHz channels can only be operated in narrow band mode.

151.820 MHz
151.880 MHz
151.940 MHz
154.570 MHz
154.600 MHz

Each of the five frequencies can not only transmit voice, but also data. The best example of this are the driveway alarms which transmit a signal via MURS when the IR sensor is tripped.
Can you hear me now?

Another hidden benefit of MURS frequencies are the PL codes (Private Line codes) or CTCSS (Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System) which are sub-audible tones that allow users to operate on the same channel without hearing chatter directed to other users.

There are 38 PL codes available to each of the five MURS frequencies, which makes for a combination of 190 different MURS channels. While this is not encryption, anyone not operating with the same PL code won’t hear your conversation.
How MURS stacks up

Most everyone has seen the small hand-held walkie-talkies that operate on the FRS (Family Radio Service), the best example of this are the small Motorola Talkabout Radios marketed towards family communication.

Here are some great comparisons courtesy of PRSG.

Compared with FRS (Family Radio Service) at 460 MHz:

MURS (at 150 MHz) permits four times more power (2 Watts TPO instead the 0.500 Watts ERP limit for FRS).
At MURS frequencies, signals bend over hills better, but FRS signals are better at bouncing off of surfaces and penetrating into/escaping out of buildings.
You may connect a MURS radio to an external or exterior antenna. FRS radios must employ a non-detachable antenna. For vehicle-to-vehicle operation with external (roof-mount) antennas, MURS should provide three to ten (or more) times the range possible with FRS radios.

Compared with GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service) at 460 MHz:

GMRS handheld radios have typically two to five watts transmitter power. GMRS vehicular units transmit typically with ten to 50 watts. There is no limit on the ERP of GMRS stations operating on the primary channels. GMRS stations may transmit with no more the 5 Watts ERP on the seven “interstitial” frequencies (those shared with the FRS).
GMRS operation requires an FCC license.
At MURS frequencies, signals bend over hills better, but GMRS signals are better at bouncing off of surfaces and penetrating into/escaping out of buildings.
For vehicle-to-vehicle operation with external (roof-mount) antennas, MURS should provide one-and-a-half to four times the range possible with GMRS handheld radios also connected to roof-mount antennas. Depending on the surrounding terrain, MURS units connected to roof-mounted antennas might even outperform full-power (50 watt) GMRS mobile units, although the GMRS units should have a greater range in open terrain.
Many GMRS radios can communicate through repeater stations for extended range (typically up to twenty miles or more, sometimes much more). The new FCC Rules will prohibit repeaters in MURS.

Compared with CB (Citizens Band Radio) at 27 MHz:

CB radios may transmit with more power than MURS units may, but communications range is highly dependent on channel congestion and atmospheric conditions. CB communications can also be significantly degraded by noise from vehicle ignition systems and from other man-made sources.
CB signals bend over hills and around obstacles much better than MURS (at 150 MHz) or FRS/GMRS (at 460 MHz) signals.
Vehicle-to-vehicle MURS communications will probably be comparable and possibly quite superior to that available in the CB service.
MURS communications will not suffer from the kind of long-range “skip” interference frequently encountered on CB radio at 27 MHz.

Keep in mind on all these comparisons that MURS has it’s benefits, but GMRS requires an FCC license to operate on.
Where to buy?

MURS radios can now be commonly found online at retailers such as Amazon.com and are starting to increase in popularity as more people find out what they’re missing. The great thing about MURS frequencies is that they can be programmed (with or without PL codes) into existing radios which can be a backup to licensed communication. A dedicated MURS radio also makes a good backup radio if your primary means of communication go down.”

Statistics: Posted by WillProspector — Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:33 pm


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: “walkie talkie”

September 5, 2017 WillProspector 0
trips-man wrote:
I’m wanting to purchase emergency communication equipment for communicating w/ a specific across-the-street neighbor after SHTF. I’m guessing a pair of “walkie talkies” would be good enough?

I highly suggest reading this article The Best Kept Secret in Radio Communication By The ITS Crew
http://www.itstactical.com/digicom/comm … unication/
“License free, low cost, two-way communication. What’s not to love about MURS? MURS stands for Multi User Radio Service, and is one of the best kept secrets in personal and family radio communications.

Formerly available only for business communications, the FCC has kept five MURS frequencies license-free and open for public use since 2000. Handheld radios broadcasting on MURS frequencies can experience a range of two miles to eight miles depending on terrain and obstructions, while MURS Base Stations can reach up to 20 miles.

The stipulations for MURS use provided by the FCC restrict any transmitter in excess of two watts, but any type of antenna is allowed as long as the tower height (with antenna) is no greater than 60 feet high. All communications must also yield to any emergency communication on the same channel.
Frequencies

The five MURS frequencies are listed below, The 154 MHz channels can be operated on the standard 25 kHz wide band or narrow band mode. The 151 MHz channels can only be operated in narrow band mode.

151.820 MHz
151.880 MHz
151.940 MHz
154.570 MHz
154.600 MHz

Each of the five frequencies can not only transmit voice, but also data. The best example of this are the driveway alarms which transmit a signal via MURS when the IR sensor is tripped.
Can you hear me now?

Another hidden benefit of MURS frequencies are the PL codes (Private Line codes) or CTCSS (Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System) which are sub-audible tones that allow users to operate on the same channel without hearing chatter directed to other users.

There are 38 PL codes available to each of the five MURS frequencies, which makes for a combination of 190 different MURS channels. While this is not encryption, anyone not operating with the same PL code won’t hear your conversation.
How MURS stacks up

Most everyone has seen the small hand-held walkie-talkies that operate on the FRS (Family Radio Service), the best example of this are the small Motorola Talkabout Radios marketed towards family communication.

Here are some great comparisons courtesy of PRSG.

Compared with FRS (Family Radio Service) at 460 MHz:

MURS (at 150 MHz) permits four times more power (2 Watts TPO instead the 0.500 Watts ERP limit for FRS).
At MURS frequencies, signals bend over hills better, but FRS signals are better at bouncing off of surfaces and penetrating into/escaping out of buildings.
You may connect a MURS radio to an external or exterior antenna. FRS radios must employ a non-detachable antenna. For vehicle-to-vehicle operation with external (roof-mount) antennas, MURS should provide three to ten (or more) times the range possible with FRS radios.

Compared with GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service) at 460 MHz:

GMRS handheld radios have typically two to five watts transmitter power. GMRS vehicular units transmit typically with ten to 50 watts. There is no limit on the ERP of GMRS stations operating on the primary channels. GMRS stations may transmit with no more the 5 Watts ERP on the seven “interstitial” frequencies (those shared with the FRS).
GMRS operation requires an FCC license.
At MURS frequencies, signals bend over hills better, but GMRS signals are better at bouncing off of surfaces and penetrating into/escaping out of buildings.
For vehicle-to-vehicle operation with external (roof-mount) antennas, MURS should provide one-and-a-half to four times the range possible with GMRS handheld radios also connected to roof-mount antennas. Depending on the surrounding terrain, MURS units connected to roof-mounted antennas might even outperform full-power (50 watt) GMRS mobile units, although the GMRS units should have a greater range in open terrain.
Many GMRS radios can communicate through repeater stations for extended range (typically up to twenty miles or more, sometimes much more). The new FCC Rules will prohibit repeaters in MURS.

Compared with CB (Citizens Band Radio) at 27 MHz:

CB radios may transmit with more power than MURS units may, but communications range is highly dependent on channel congestion and atmospheric conditions. CB communications can also be significantly degraded by noise from vehicle ignition systems and from other man-made sources.
CB signals bend over hills and around obstacles much better than MURS (at 150 MHz) or FRS/GMRS (at 460 MHz) signals.
Vehicle-to-vehicle MURS communications will probably be comparable and possibly quite superior to that available in the CB service.
MURS communications will not suffer from the kind of long-range “skip” interference frequently encountered on CB radio at 27 MHz.

Keep in mind on all these comparisons that MURS has it’s benefits, but GMRS requires an FCC license to operate on.
Where to buy?

MURS radios can now be commonly found online at retailers such as Amazon.com and are starting to increase in popularity as more people find out what they’re missing. The great thing about MURS frequencies is that they can be programmed (with or without PL codes) into existing radios which can be a backup to licensed communication. A dedicated MURS radio also makes a good backup radio if your primary means of communication go down.”

Statistics: Posted by WillProspector — Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:23 pm


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Hooking up with my friend via HF radio..

August 14, 2017 orangetom1999 0

Follow up to the op..from back in February.

My friend out in Tennessee and I have hooked up many many times since and work both the 160 and 80 meter bands. Of current…the 160 meter band tends to have more static crashes that 80 meters and we planned for this.

The last time …Saturday…for which we worked 80 meters the static crashes and noise level got bad there and we ran a bit of power from our amplifiers. I stuck to about 200 watts..and he to about 400 watts. This got us above the noise level which was all we needed. We have more power but this was sufficient for our needs and we are also working in the lower end of the Phone spectrum in the Extra class portion of the frequency allocation on 80 meters. This gets us away from most of the traffic out there. We are not into bumping heads with other Hams.

It has been great being able to hook up so and not run up our phone bills. I was at first doubtful as to how well it would work but my friend was not.

Thanks,
Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:34 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Hooking up with my friend via HF radio..

August 14, 2017 orangetom1999 0

Follow up to the op..from back in February.

My friend out in Tennessee and I have hooked up many many times since and work both the 160 and 80 meter bands. Of current…the 160 meter band tends to have more static crashes that 80 meters and we planned for this.

The last time …Saturday…for which we worked 80 meters the static crashes and noise level got bad there and we ran a bit of power from our amplifiers. I stuck to about 200 watts..and he to about 400 watts. This got us above the noise level which was all we needed. We have more power but this was sufficient for our needs and we are also working in the lower end of the Phone spectrum in the Extra class portion of the frequency allocation on 80 meters. This gets us away from most of the traffic out there. We are not into bumping heads with other Hams.

It has been great being able to hook up so and not run up our phone bills. I was at first doubtful as to how well it would work but my friend was not.

Thanks,
Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:34 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Hooking up with my friend via HF radio..

August 14, 2017 orangetom1999 0

Follow up to the op..from back in February.

My friend out in Tennessee and I have hooked up many many times since and work both the 160 and 80 meter bands. Of current…the 160 meter band tends to have more static crashes that 80 meters and we planned for this.

The last time …Saturday…for which we worked 80 meters the static crashes and noise level got bad there and we ran a bit of power from our amplifiers. I stuck to about 200 watts..and he to about 400 watts. This got us above the noise level which was all we needed. We have more power but this was sufficient for our needs and we are also working in the lower end of the Phone spectrum in the Extra class portion of the frequency allocation on 80 meters. This gets us away from most of the traffic out there. We are not into bumping heads with other Hams.

It has been great being able to hook up so and not run up our phone bills. I was at first doubtful as to how well it would work but my friend was not.

Thanks,
Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:34 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Hooking up with my friend via HF radio..

August 14, 2017 orangetom1999 0

Follow up to the op..from back in February.

My friend out in Tennessee and I have hooked up many many times since and work both the 160 and 80 meter bands. Of current…the 160 meter band tends to have more static crashes that 80 meters and we planned for this.

The last time …Saturday…for which we worked 80 meters the static crashes and noise level got bad there and we ran a bit of power from our amplifiers. I stuck to about 200 watts..and he to about 400 watts. This got us above the noise level which was all we needed. We have more power but this was sufficient for our needs and we are also working in the lower end of the Phone spectrum in the Extra class portion of the frequency allocation on 80 meters. This gets us away from most of the traffic out there. We are not into bumping heads with other Hams.

It has been great being able to hook up so and not run up our phone bills. I was at first doubtful as to how well it would work but my friend was not.

Thanks,
Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:34 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

June 30, 2017 orangetom1999 0

A suggestion , If I might…..

A peaked and tuned radio is fine…for sure.

However…there might come conditions in a SHTF situation where you do not want to leave a peaked and tuned fingerprint…or running so much power that you stand out all across the country or country.

With this in mind it is often nice and convenient to have a variable resistor installed in line by which you can adjust your out put power up or down as needed. This no matter how powerful your final transistor puts out the watts. In this manner it us up to you as to how big a fingerprint your rig leaves in the airwaves.

This is common on most HF Ham radios and I have seen CB’ers who have incorporated this feature into the backs of their rigs.

You might not want everyone to know you are there by leaving a huge amount of power…a huge fingerprint …to let everyone know you are there.

For those of you who know how…a directional antenna and adjustable power are optimal….and for those who know even more….the ground plane of your vehicle and how to use it to your best advantage helps as well…with adjustable output power. In otherwords the transmitting pattern of your mobile set up..how and in what direction your mobile antenna transmits the best.

This no matter what bands on which one operates.

Just a passing thought.

Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:57 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications • Re: Are CB radios still an option?

June 30, 2017 orangetom1999 0

A suggestion , If I might…..

A peaked and tuned radio is fine…for sure.

However…there might come conditions in a SHTF situation where you do not want to leave a peaked and tuned fingerprint…or running so much power that you stand out all across the country or country.

With this in mind it is often nice and convenient to have a variable resistor installed in line by which you can adjust your out put power up or down as needed. This no matter how powerful your final transistor puts out the watts. In this manner it us up to you as to how big a fingerprint your rig leaves in the airwaves.

This is common on most HF Ham radios and I have seen CB’ers who have incorporated this feature into the backs of their rigs.

You might not want everyone to know you are there by leaving a huge amount of power…a huge fingerprint …to let everyone know you are there.

For those of you who know how…a directional antenna and adjustable power are optimal….and for those who know even more….the ground plane of your vehicle and how to use it to your best advantage helps as well…with adjustable output power. In otherwords the transmitting pattern of your mobile set up..how and in what direction your mobile antenna transmits the best.

This no matter what bands on which one operates.

Just a passing thought.

Orangetom

Statistics: Posted by orangetom1999 — Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:57 am


No Picture

Emergency Communications

June 11, 2017 gman 0

Emergency Communications Ray Becker “Renaissance Man” Audio player provided! Way back when our prepping community was developing on YouTube, I had identified an important subject; Communications. In a grid down scenario or some other emergency, being able to communicate or at least listen, would be vital for information, Intel and would be a huge psychological … Continue reading Emergency Communications

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