BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 14, 2017 daaswampman 0

Good post and a great reminder! I don’t carry everything you list, but I do believe in carrying supplies and tools. However my list is from my experiences stranded on the side of the road! I am open to learn from others, as I would rather not learn by being on the side of the road.

I carry at least two spares when going off pavement, radiator hoses, belts, bulbs, fuses, replacement fluids, a hi-lift jack, appropriate tools, and a couple good tarps. A tarp sure beats kneeling in the mud and a bumper jack is much better than crawling on the ground to place a crappy factory jack on the frame!

I would also immediately replace plastic or decorative bumpers with something that can be used as a bumper! Many Thanks! Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Fri Apr 14, 2017 5:16 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 Cin 0

I had one of those plastic cat litter containers in my vehicle with bungee cords, ratchet straps, jumper cables, a net, and some tools. Jack and tire iron were stored in a lift-up portion in the trunk. Somehow, in the move, the whole box disappeared. Not quite sure where it went.

I was just telling Husband that we need to get a tool kit for the 2 vehicles we drive a lot. The truck is our “farm truck” and has all kinds of tools in it, but it isn’t driven on a daily basis.

Last week, one of our neighbors needed a jump and we took our battery charger down to help her out. Turns out with her big SUV, the charger wasn’t enough. We ended up having to use my Dad’s jumper cables (because we couldn’t find ours). So last week, I bought Husband a set of jumper cables to put in the car.

I’ll be stocking the car tool box soon.

Statistics: Posted by Cin — Thu Apr 13, 2017 5:38 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 MoosePath 0

Every vehicle I have owned the first thing I do is buy a rim and full size spare tire to fit that vehicle. We do a lot of gravel road driving and those cheap donuts they give with the vehicle are worthless. Another valuable tool is a good flashlight that stays in the vehicle 24/7, nothing sucks more then have to change a flat in the dark without light.

Statistics: Posted by MoosePath — Thu Apr 13, 2017 4:39 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 Permafrost 0

I’ll second what Illini said.

My wife has a cordless 1/2″ impact wrench and a floor jack in her ride, takes longer to drop the tire from underneath her ride than it does to actually change her tire. She also has a plug in 12V air compressor and a tire plug kit so tires can be repaired & inflated on the vehicle. Makes all the difference on bad gravel roads where you loose at least 1 tire per trip, she can’t get heavy duty tires (load range E) in her size.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Apr 13, 2017 1:51 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 Illini Warrior 0

if you don’t do anything else for your vehicle emergencies – check over your tire changing capabilities – wouldn’t recommend just the standard OEM package that comes with the vehicle …. you definitely can use better leverage on those lugnuts – a 4way +wrench and a combo 18 inch breaker bar/pipe can get even the worse loose … a simple 6′ X 8′ blue tarp makes the job cleaner … and a better jack like a hydraulic bottle jack and a some wood blocking makes a non-pavement tire changing even possible ….

Statistics: Posted by Illini Warrior — Thu Apr 13, 2017 1:19 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 angie_nrs 0
Blondie wrote:

Gunns wrote:Good post. I don’t have any of those things in my truck.

Father’s Day is coming. ;)

Which means some great sales!! Actually Home Depot has some good spring sales too. Got a new tool cart for hubby and saved $100….he’s been eyeing it for a long while now.

Also make sure you have ratchet straps too. I can’t tell you how many times they’ve come in handy for us.

Statistics: Posted by angie_nrs — Thu Apr 13, 2017 12:13 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0

Yep…Been meaning to stock up my new truck and just haven’t gotten around to it…I’ll jump off here and do it now since I cant sleep……Ahhhhh, E-commerce. :)

Thanks for the reminder Permafrost.

I probably don’t need to remind you, but…Thermometer.:)

Say safe up there sir.

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Thu Apr 13, 2017 8:24 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Tools

April 13, 2017 DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE 0

Yep…Been meaning to stock up my new truck and just haven’t gotten around to it…I’ll jump off here and do it now since I cant sleep……Ahhhhh, E-commerce. :)

Thanks for the reminder Permafrost.

I probably don’t need to remind you, but…Thermometer.:)

Say safe up there sir.

Statistics: Posted by DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE — Thu Apr 13, 2017 8:24 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Tools

April 12, 2017 Permafrost 0

Was not sure where to put this, but it involves vehicles so I figured this was as good a place as any.

I recently got back to town from the cabin and yesterday I decided to finally fire up my old diesel truck and go into town. Needless to say I broke down. Shredded the serpentine belt, probably because it has not been used in forever and I should have checked before I left. Normally this is not a big deal. I carry a spare belt along with a extra alternator and power steering pump, tensioner & idler pulleys, fluids and filters, and even a spare mechanical fuel injection pump & fuel tank lift pump. It was when I went to change it that I ran into problems, all of my tools (and there are a lot of them) are still packed on my snowmachine & freight sled. I got running by buying some cheep wrenches & double wrenching (pales in comparison to a serpentine belt tool) to get the new belt on, but it was a wake up call about my memory. I had enough parts in the back seat of my truck to fix most common problems, but I had forgotten to switch the tools over from my winter transport to my spring ride.

I figured I would post this as a reminder to all to make sure they have their vehicles fully stocked when they use them. I know I am looking at getting triple sets of tools now (boat, snowmachine, truck) so that this does not happen again, even cheep yard sale tools are better than none.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:28 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Tools

April 12, 2017 Permafrost 0

Was not sure where to put this, but it involves vehicles so I figured this was as good a place as any.

I recently got back to town from the cabin and yesterday I decided to finally fire up my old diesel truck and go into town. Needless to say I broke down. Shredded the serpentine belt, probably because it has not been used in forever and I should have checked before I left. Normally this is not a big deal. I carry a spare belt along with a extra alternator and power steering pump, tensioner & idler pulleys, fluids and filters, and even a spare mechanical fuel injection pump & fuel tank lift pump. It was when I went to change it that I ran into problems, all of my tools (and there are a lot of them) are still packed on my snowmachine & freight sled. I got running by buying some cheep wrenches & double wrenching (pales in comparison to a serpentine belt tool) to get the new belt on, but it was a wake up call about my memory. I had enough parts in the back seat of my truck to fix most common problems, but I had forgotten to switch the tools over from my winter transport to my spring ride.

I figured I would post this as a reminder to all to make sure they have their vehicles fully stocked when they use them. I know I am looking at getting triple sets of tools now (boat, snowmachine, truck) so that this does not happen again, even cheep yard sale tools are better than none.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:28 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Trail 90 bug out bike

March 21, 2017 ejlogging3709 0

Like the trail 90’s got one, dead battery during wither storage. Made two canvas saddle bags for mine and leather rifle scabard to go on bike like on a saddle with butt sticking out the back. works great while dear hunting on the bike. Have taken it on lots of dirt roads and off the road camping twice. Would like to do that again. I live in ca 95695 area if you live close to that zip in ca would like to see your bike

    :thumbsup:

    Statistics: Posted by ejlogging3709 — Mon Mar 20, 2017 8:51 pm


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    BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Survival Bucket

    February 8, 2017 theoutback 0

    I just put 3 together this weekend, but they are more food based buckets though. Some things like tuna and such will need to be rotated, so it will be part of the 1st of the year to do list, like changing batteries in smoke alarms.

    Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:28 am


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    BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Survival Bucket

    February 8, 2017 apache235 0

    Yup, I get different supplies than on that list, store them in a smaller backpack along with a supply of food and water purification stuff (or filter), knife and a good fire steel, some tinder etc. Leave the store bought kits and make your own.

    Statistics: Posted by apache235 — Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:36 pm


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    BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: First BOB (Heavy Loadout)

    January 29, 2017 Fyrediver 0

    Something previously mentioned: can you stash supplies at your friend’s house and lighten your load so you can move faster? Are you going to fish and set snares or cover distance as quickly as possible? Ammo is heavy. Be realistic about your plans and abilities.

    Can you lose the pack and still have basic survival supplies (ie in the pockets of your vest or waist pouch)? I suggest packing in layers: Pack, Vest, Jacket/pants pockets.

    Plastic ponchos are pretty fragile. I’d suggest going with something more durable. Wiggy’s makes a nice one and has a very nice poncho liner to go with it. I carry two lightweight, ripstop ponchos. One can be a shelter and the second is my “sleeping bag” when combined with the liner or any other clothing I have.

    Might want to consider a lightweight pair of rain pants or chaps. Ponchos are notorious for getting the legs soaking wet. Also they’ll keep you warm if its windy.

    I fail to see anything about waterproof bags, flotation, etc for river travel. How are you keeping the contents dry and floating in the event of a capsize/sinking etc? How are you going to keep YOU floating in the same situation?

    Ditch the first aid book and just learn first aid. Also, I’m a fan of Israeli battle dressings but you can improvise them with the addition of an elastic wrap bandage. Triangular bandage is also very useful to bandage wounds, make a sling etc. Again, just learn first aid. The more wilderness focused the better. Improvisation is your friend.

    Climbing rope (dynamic) is heavy and quite bulky. What are your plans for that? Any equipment to go with it? Webbing, carabiners, etc? Thin, lighter rope can be had to do similar functions depending on what you’re planning on doing with it. Dynamic versus Static.

    How are you carrying the pistol? Presuming it’s going to be quickly available but you’re also wearing a pack. Have you seen the Hill People Gear kit bags? http://www.hillpeoplegear.com/Products/ … fault.aspx

    I’m a fan of modern LED lights using AAA batteries. I carry a headlamp and a handheld lamp which both use the AAA batteries. A LOT of light and where you want it.

    Have you ever worn your ballistic vest and the pack? I’d try it and then also figure out if the layers work together or if there are conflicts when you put it all on.

    Why the Allen set for the scope? Usually there’s just one size but what do you need a set for?

    Might want to add a small roll of duct tape — can wrap it around one of your water bottles or a pencil. Quite helpful for repairs.

    Three pair of gloves? Can you get by with two working gloves?

    My 24 – 48 hour GHB (kit) weighs about 25 lbs and is intended to get me over 25 miles overland. I have supplies in my car (folding shovel, tomahawk, extra jacket, etc) and in my office that can supplement the kit depending on the situation but my basic kit is very lightweight. My personal plan is to cover the distance as quickly as possible. I have duplicates and redundancies in my kit but they get progressively smaller the closer you get to my body. ie a road flare in my pack is a tiny lighter sparker in my jacket pocket.

    You’re well on the way. Good job.

    Statistics: Posted by Fyrediver — Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:45 pm