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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Survival Bucket

February 8, 2017 theoutback 0

I just put 3 together this weekend, but they are more food based buckets though. Some things like tuna and such will need to be rotated, so it will be part of the 1st of the year to do list, like changing batteries in smoke alarms.

Statistics: Posted by theoutback — Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:28 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Survival Bucket

February 8, 2017 apache235 0

Yup, I get different supplies than on that list, store them in a smaller backpack along with a supply of food and water purification stuff (or filter), knife and a good fire steel, some tinder etc. Leave the store bought kits and make your own.

Statistics: Posted by apache235 — Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:36 pm


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: First BOB (Heavy Loadout)

January 29, 2017 Fyrediver 0

Something previously mentioned: can you stash supplies at your friend’s house and lighten your load so you can move faster? Are you going to fish and set snares or cover distance as quickly as possible? Ammo is heavy. Be realistic about your plans and abilities.

Can you lose the pack and still have basic survival supplies (ie in the pockets of your vest or waist pouch)? I suggest packing in layers: Pack, Vest, Jacket/pants pockets.

Plastic ponchos are pretty fragile. I’d suggest going with something more durable. Wiggy’s makes a nice one and has a very nice poncho liner to go with it. I carry two lightweight, ripstop ponchos. One can be a shelter and the second is my “sleeping bag” when combined with the liner or any other clothing I have.

Might want to consider a lightweight pair of rain pants or chaps. Ponchos are notorious for getting the legs soaking wet. Also they’ll keep you warm if its windy.

I fail to see anything about waterproof bags, flotation, etc for river travel. How are you keeping the contents dry and floating in the event of a capsize/sinking etc? How are you going to keep YOU floating in the same situation?

Ditch the first aid book and just learn first aid. Also, I’m a fan of Israeli battle dressings but you can improvise them with the addition of an elastic wrap bandage. Triangular bandage is also very useful to bandage wounds, make a sling etc. Again, just learn first aid. The more wilderness focused the better. Improvisation is your friend.

Climbing rope (dynamic) is heavy and quite bulky. What are your plans for that? Any equipment to go with it? Webbing, carabiners, etc? Thin, lighter rope can be had to do similar functions depending on what you’re planning on doing with it. Dynamic versus Static.

How are you carrying the pistol? Presuming it’s going to be quickly available but you’re also wearing a pack. Have you seen the Hill People Gear kit bags? http://www.hillpeoplegear.com/Products/ … fault.aspx

I’m a fan of modern LED lights using AAA batteries. I carry a headlamp and a handheld lamp which both use the AAA batteries. A LOT of light and where you want it.

Have you ever worn your ballistic vest and the pack? I’d try it and then also figure out if the layers work together or if there are conflicts when you put it all on.

Why the Allen set for the scope? Usually there’s just one size but what do you need a set for?

Might want to add a small roll of duct tape — can wrap it around one of your water bottles or a pencil. Quite helpful for repairs.

Three pair of gloves? Can you get by with two working gloves?

My 24 – 48 hour GHB (kit) weighs about 25 lbs and is intended to get me over 25 miles overland. I have supplies in my car (folding shovel, tomahawk, extra jacket, etc) and in my office that can supplement the kit depending on the situation but my basic kit is very lightweight. My personal plan is to cover the distance as quickly as possible. I have duplicates and redundancies in my kit but they get progressively smaller the closer you get to my body. ie a road flare in my pack is a tiny lighter sparker in my jacket pocket.

You’re well on the way. Good job.

Statistics: Posted by Fyrediver — Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:45 pm