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General Homesteading Topics • Type of lime for an outhouse

June 20, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

This is just a question for anyone who has an outhouse or uses lime on raw sewage. What kind of lime do you use? I’m getting some garden lime for gardening and was wondering what kind of lime is used to treat sewage; e.g. I’ve read stuff that says to throw some wood ash or lime onto excreta because it will help to inactivate pathogens, which is the same reason they used to use it on corpses in burial pits. I thought it would be good to have on hand for an SHFT situation. But, the more I look at it, the more confusing it is. There’s dolomite lime, hydrated lime, quicklime, garden lime, and that’s just a partial list. Any info. is appreciated. Thanks in advance to everyone.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue Jun 20, 2017 11:11 am


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Gardening • Re: Sunchokes

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

Thanks Reb. I’ll give that a try. I was wondering if I pruned the flower heads if that would work. I’ll just have to make sure to stay on top of it and keep them pruned and not let them seed.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 5:31 pm


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Gardening • Re: Sunchokes

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0
rebnavy1862 wrote:
They are similar to sunflowers. Mature seeds cab be spread by birds or the wind. I have had them shoot up over a hundred feet from the original patch. By cutting the immature seed heads, you force more bulb growth. Plant in as big a pot as you can. Preferrably a heavy pot.
Plants grow ten feet high or more. They can blow over. One plant can produce tubers for a two foot diameter.
Reb

Thanks Reb. So, it sounds like there’s no way I can guarantee that they won’t spread. That’s too bad. I wish I had a way to store the roots. I can freeze seeds, but I don’t really have a good way to permanently keep roots on hand.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 2:04 pm


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Gardening • Re: Curing potatoes?

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0
anita wrote:
I’ve left mine in the ground as long as possible as well. Sometimes they grow again after they die back, and those potatoes were just fine too.

And even after I dig them, I always miss a few, and they come up the next year.

Gook to know, Anita. Thanks.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 12:52 pm


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Gardening • Sunchokes

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

I know there’s been some discussion of growing Jerusalem artichokes (a.k.a. sunchokes) here on the board. I have a couple of tubers I’d like to plant, but I don’t want the plants to spread at all. I’d just like to have some tubers available to plant in a larger area in an SHTF scenario. So, I’m thinking about planting the ones that I have in a couple of large pots so I’ll have access to some tubers if I want to plant some more, or just want a few to eat now and then. But I was wondering if sunchokes can spread by seed. I could lop off the flower once it starts to bloom, but I really don’t want to take a chance that they can spread beyond the pots. Does anyone know if they can spread by seed, or have any suggestions about growing and keeping the plants in pots? Thanks in advance everyone.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 12:48 pm


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Gardening • Re: Curing potatoes?

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0
Fullmoon wrote:
I usually leave potato’s right in the ground and dig them up as needed. Cover with a 6″ layer of leaves or straw so they don’t freeze during December and January. Must have well drained soil to do this or they may rot. Have not had any insect problems and this will save time, labor and storage space.

Thanks Fullmoon. I didn’t know that you could do that. Do you cut the plant stems off at the ground after they die back? Then lay down the straw before it gets cold? It never gets below the mid twenties where I live, and even then its for a very short time. So, that method would work great for me assuming I’ve got well drained soil.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 11:00 am


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Gardening • Re: Curing potatoes?

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0
Fullmoon wrote:
I usually leave potato’s right in the ground and dig them up as needed. Cover with a 6″ layer of leaves or straw so they don’t freeze during December and January. Must have well drained soil to do this or they may rot. Have not had any insect problems and this will save time, labor and storage space.

Thanks Fullmoon. I didn’t know that you could do that. Do you cut the plant stems off at the ground after they die back? Then lay down the straw before it gets cold? It never gets below the mid twenties where I live, and even then its for a very short time. So, that method would work great for me assuming I’ve got well drained soil.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 11:00 am


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Gardening • Re: Curing potatoes?

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

Thanks Reb. You helped me find what I was looking for. Basically curing them makes them store longer. If I don’t cure them at all, they’re “new” potatoes – taste great, but won’t store for as long as a cured potato.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 9:38 am


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Gardening • Curing potatoes?

May 30, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

I’m a very inexperienced gardener. I have a small yard and I’ve been doing a little experimenting with planting some vegetables. I planted a few potatoes in the spring (I live in Florida), the plants are dying back, and I think they’ll be ready to dig up in a couple of weeks. Everything I read and see on videos tells you to “cure” the potatoes by letting them sit in a cool, dry place for 10 days or so. My question is, in an SHTF situation, I won’t have a cool, dry, place at potato harvest time, and I’m wondering what to do just to “get by”, so to speak. I’d really appreciate any input from more experienced gardeners. What if I don’t cure the potatoes, and instead, maybe just sit them in a dry, shady spot. How long do I need to let them sit? And, is “curing” them absolutely necessary? If you needed to, could you just eat them right after digging them up? Appreciate any info. Thanks in advance to everyone.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue May 30, 2017 8:33 am


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Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 11, 2017 SuburbPrepper 0

Hi AuntBee,

I have the Ruger SR22 and I love it. Don’t do what I did and order an extra magazine because it comes with two and the magazines are expensive (I think it was about $36 for the extra mag). I didn’t realize it came with two when I ordered it, so my mistake. Also, I recommend the 4 inch barrel. I shot one with a shorter barrel (I think it was 3.5 inch), but I liked the 4 inch barrel more. I realize it’s personal preference and depends on what you want it for (e.g. CC), but the feel / balance / accuracy was just better with the 4 inch barrel for me. If you have a chance, shoot both and see what you think. It is extremely easy to field strip and clean and it has a de-cocking mechanism that is very handy. You can de-cock it to carry it for DA for the first shot, with SA for subsequent shots. The magazines have a thumb pull tab on the outside of the magazine to pull the spring down, which makes them extremely easy to load. I know for a .22, mag loading is easy anyway, but it is a nice feature, especially for someone who might struggle a little with loading a conventional mag for whatever reason.

Statistics: Posted by SuburbPrepper — Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:59 pm