No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Inside Cheyenne Mountain II

May 22, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Inside Cheyenne Mountain II
http://www.krdo.com/news/colorado-sprin … /508026955

COLO SPRINGS, Co. – In response to fears associated with the Cold War, Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station was built in the early 1960’s to withstand a nuclear explosion.

An emerging high tech threat, however, has created new value in this manmade cave designed more than half a century ago.

The original tenant of the mountain, NORAD, still maintains an alternate command center in the underground complex, but in 2006, the agency officially moved its headquarters to Peterson Air Force Base.

That move generated talk about shutting down Cheyenne Mountain entirely.

“There was a lot of vacant space in the mountain, and there were some conversations in those times, the Rumsfeldt era, about whether or not to shutter Cheyenne Mountain,” explained Colonel Gary Cornn Jr., the commander of 721st Mission Support Group in charge of operating and security the installation.

However, the increasing threat from countries like North Korea and Iran, who are determined to develop nuclear weapons and the missiles that carry them, has reversed that talk.

The new fears are not associated with the classic mushroom-cloud explosion associated with nuclear weapons, but rather an EMP blast.

The detonation of a nuclear missile at the right spot above the earth could create an invisible but powerful electromagnetic pulse that could destroy not only every unprotected electronic device in the country, but the power grid itself, taking decades to recover from.

Col. Cornn says the 2,000 feet of granite, along with more subtle features of the mountain complex, acts as a shield against an EMP.

On a normal day, Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station draws electricity from Colorado Springs Utilities, but the military is able to cut the cord almost immediately and switch over to internal generator power in a matter of moments if needed.

“There’s a capability that we have to disconnect from the grid, and that allows us to save up from an EMP threat,” says Cornn.

As a result, the head of NORAD and NORTHCOM confirmed in 2015 for the first time that a number of groups have moved equipment and staff back into Cheyenne Mountain, specifically for its EMP protection.

Admiral William Gortney, now retired, said, “It wasn’t really designed to be that way, but the way it was constructed makes it that way, so there’s a lot of movement to put capability into Cheyenne Mountain and to be able to communicate in there.”

Admiral Gortney wouldn’t confirm which groups have sought space in the mountain, but the fact that he can’t suggests they are among the most critical to the nation’s defense. —- CONTINUED at LINK with VIDEO —

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 22, 2017 10:59 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • EMPs & Automobiles

May 22, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Could a nuclear generated electromagnetic pulse kill your car?
http://www.electropages.com/2017/05/cou … -kill-car/

Published May 22 2017

Most of us know about the latest round of sabre-rattling, chest-thumping verbal exchanges between the USA and North Korea as they strive to convince each other their military weapons are biggest and best. Its familiar stuff, except for just recently when the subject of nuclear generated electromagnetic pulses reared its potentially devastating head.

Electromagnetic pulses (EMP) as a form of military weapon have of course been known about for years although information about them has been closely guarded.

An enemy could use EMP to destroy the electrical and electronic infrastructure of another country with massively debilitating effect. Anything from communications systems, power grids, electronic equipment, water and fuel services and much more could be disabled by an EMP attack.

However one element of modern life that may possibly withstand such an attack are the cars we drive.

But before delving into that, what is an EMP? The most familiar one to most of us is a lightening strike which in EMP parlance is classified as an E2 strike. Potentially very dangerous but usually controlled by surge protection technology so damage is minimised.

Nuclear generated EMP

In comparison to lightening, an EMP created by a high altitude nuclear device has the higher classification of E1 and is far more powerful.

Following such a nuclear detonation, gamma rays are released that start to absorb electrons from the atmosphere and both of these head towards earth. This is called the Compton Effect and the electrons combine with Earth’s electromagnetic field to generate extremely powerful magnetic waves.

The nuclear device prompting all this doesn’t need to be that big. In the early 1960s the USA tested a 1.5-megaton nuclear EMP in a study referred to as Starfish Prime above the Pacific Ocean. It caused electrical damage 900 miles away in Hawaii by disabling about 3% of the island’s street lighting.

However, if that same warhead had been exploded 200 miles above the US mainland the damage would have been far more. The strength of that EMP would have been up to 30,000Volts/metre because the Earth’s magnetic field has greater strength over the United States territory rather than the Pacific Ocean. And while on the subject of EMP strength, scientists today estimate that in the right location an E1 EMP could be as powerful as 50,000Volts/metre.

Wrecked Infrastructure

So having wrecked a substantial amount of what is considered modern infrastructure would a nuclear EMP attack also disable our cars? This is a tricky question to answer because even today the effects of a true nuclear EMP are difficult to accurately predict.

At the time of the Starfish Prime test cars were much simpler technically than today’s vehicles and the generally held view at that time was cars might stall but would probably start up and run normally.

Today opinions on the subject vary enormously. One view is that if your car has electronic fuel injection, anything computerised that controls your vehicle’s primary systems, a powertrain control module, ABS, electronic ignition or keyless ignition then your vehicle would be totally disabled by an E1 EMP of 50,000Volts/metre.

Sensitive Electronics

However, opposing that somewhat negative perspective is the view that many vehicles might survive an E1 EMP. Sensitive electronics may be shielded well enough to continue to operate. In effect, the metal parts of a car body could potentially act as a Faraday cage. And lets not forget that many electronic components used in cars have to operate in harsh, high temperature conditions and consequently are often of more robust design and are well protected.

However, the Faraday cage optimism is somewhat dented by the fact that if a car body did form a perfect cage then you wouldn’t be able to make phone calls from it.

Generally speaking the answer to whether our modern cars could stand up to an Electromagnetic Pulse attack comes down to just one thing; how strong is the attack.

Tests in the past have shown that car electronics subjected to an EMP of less than 25,000Volts/metre would not be effected. It is only when an EMP of E1 proportions (50kVm) strikes that serious problems could occur that would either totally disable the car or cause malfunctions on a car that was being driven that would inevitably result in a road traffic accident.

Tests have also shown that cars switched off at the time of a high power EMP would start and function close to normal.

So some drivers could find their cars were still working following a substantial EMP attack. The question is would they still be useful bearing in mind fuel would not be available because the electronics used in garage petrol pumps would be disabled and highway control systems such as traffic lights would be out. Add to that the fact highways would be jammed with dead cars and perhaps the overall answer to the headline question is don’t throw your bicycle away yet.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 22, 2017 10:54 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 22, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Another Missile launch on Sunday (05/21/17):

US official: North Korea launches medium-range ballistic missile
http://abcnews.go.com/International/sou … d=47539922

North Korea launched a medium-range ballistic missile Sunday afternoon, a senior Trump administration official has confirmed.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said the projectile was fired from an area about 50 miles northeast of Pyongyang.

“We are aware that North Korea launched an MRBM [medium-range ballistic missile],” the U.S. official said in a statement. “This system, last tested in February, has a shorter range than the missiles launched in North Korea’s three most recent tests.”

Prior to the U.S. official’s statement, South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement, “North Korea launched an unidentifiable projectile to the East Sea from Bukchang area in South Pyongyang Province at 16:49 today.” (The East Sea is also referred to as the Sea of Japan.)

The South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff statement continued, “The projectile flew 500 km [310 miles] and ROK and U.S. are now analyzing its detailed [sic]. ROK military is closely monitoring North Korean provocative trends and maintaining highest military readiness.”

Commander David Benham, a U.S. Pacific Command spokesman, also addressed the missile launch, saying in a statement, “U.S. Pacific Command detected and tracked what we assess was a North Korean missile launch at 09:59 p.m. Hawaii time May 20. The launch of a medium range ballistic missile occurred near Pukchang. The missile was tracked until it landed in the Sea of Japan.”

The statement continued, “We are working with our Interagency partners on a more detailed assessment. We continue to monitor North Korea’s actions closely. U.S. Pacific Command stands behind our ironclad commitment to the security of our allies in the Republic of Korea and Japan. The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) assessed that the missile launch from North Korea did not pose a threat to North America.”

South Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs condemned the missile launch, saying in a statement, “The repeated provocation of North Korea is a reckless and irresponsible act that puts cold water on the expectations and aspirations of the Korean government and the international community for the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and peace settlement, and the government strongly condemns this provocation.”

The ministry continued, “The government recently announced a firm commitment to pursue the root resolution of the North Korean nuclear issue through all means including sanctions and dialogue, through dispatching special envoys to major countries such as the US, China, Japan and Russia. While the government is open to possibility of dialogue with North Korea, it will continue to stand firmly in response to provocations, saying that North Korea should immediately stop any provocations that violated UN Security Council resolutions.”

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo Sunday, “This launch presented a grave problem from the perspective of ensuring safety of aircraft and vessels. It was also a clear violation of the United Nations’ Security Council resolution. Japan cannot accept North Korea’s repeated provocation and we have lodged a strong protest against North Korea.”

Suga added, “At this point, it is speculated that the area where it fell was not within Japan’s Economic Exclusive Zone. There has been so far no report of damage to aircraft or vessels that were passing near the point [where the missile was believed to have fallen.]”

“This launch presented a grave problem from the perspective of ensuring safety of aircraft and vessels. It was also a clear violation of the United Nations’ Security Council resolution. Japan cannot accept North Korea’s repeated provocation and we have lodged a strong protest against North Korea.”

The missile launched Sunday was last tested in February. Called the KN-15, the new solid-fueled missile traveled 310 miles into the Sea of Japan. It was a significant launch, not because of the distance traveled but because of the solid fuel missile technology used in the launch.

Gen. John Hyten, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command, told the Senate Armed Services Committee that the February launch marked a significant advancement for North Korea because it was its first successful solid-fueled missile fired from a mobile launcher.

North Korea last weekend launched a midrange missile that landed in the Sea of Japan after being launched from western North Korea. The Russian Ministry of Defense said the missile flew for about 23 minutes before crashing into the sea around 500 km (310 miles) from Russia into the center of the Sea of Japan.

ABC News’ Devin Dwyer and Joohee Cho contributed to this report.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 22, 2017 10:48 am


:tank:

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 19, 2017 ReadyMom 0
rickdun wrote:
The USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier group has left Japan for the Korean coast to join up with the other carrier group. :tank:

President Trump is playing no games with North Korea, China or Russia. The little fat boy better start to pucker up.

US Navy moves second aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan near North Korea, says defence officials
http://www.newsheads.in/world/news/us-n … /5488.html

Washington:

The US Navy is moving a second aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan, to the Korean Peninsula where it will conduct dual-carrier training drills with the USS Carl Vinson, defence officials said. After completing a maintenance period and sea trials in Yokosuka, Japan, the USS Ronald Reagan departed for the Korean Peninsula on Tuesday, the officials told CNN on Thursday.

“Coming out of a long in-port maintenance period we have to ensure that Ronald Reagan and the remainder of the strike group are integrated properly as we move forward,” Rear Admiral Charles Williams said in a statement. — CONTINUED —
===============

US Navy deploys second aircraft carrier to North Korea’s doorstep
http://www.jokpeme.com/2017/05/us-navy- … rrier.html

The US Navy is moving a second aircraft carrier to the Korean Peninsula to take part in training exercises days after North Korea conducted a “successful” ballistic missile test.
The nuclear-powered USS Ronald Reagan departed for the Korean Peninsula on Tuesday after undergoing a maintenance period and sea trials in its base in Japan, CNN reported. — CONTINUED —
===============

CVW-5 aircraft fly aboard USS Ronald Reagan for 2017 patrol
https://www.dvidshub.net/news/234446/cv … 017-patrol

WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN – Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 completed embarkation aboard the Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), May 19.

Over the course of three days, nine squadrons from CVW-5 flew more than 70 aircraft onto the flight deck of Ronald Reagan to integrate with Carrier Strike Group Five for their 2017 Patrol. — CONTINUED —

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 19, 2017 12:40 pm


:tank:

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 19, 2017 ReadyMom 0
rickdun wrote:
The USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier group has left Japan for the Korean coast to join up with the other carrier group. :tank:

President Trump is playing no games with North Korea, China or Russia. The little fat boy better start to pucker up.

US Navy moves second aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan near North Korea, says defence officials
http://www.newsheads.in/world/news/us-n … /5488.html

Washington:

The US Navy is moving a second aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan, to the Korean Peninsula where it will conduct dual-carrier training drills with the USS Carl Vinson, defence officials said. After completing a maintenance period and sea trials in Yokosuka, Japan, the USS Ronald Reagan departed for the Korean Peninsula on Tuesday, the officials told CNN on Thursday.

“Coming out of a long in-port maintenance period we have to ensure that Ronald Reagan and the remainder of the strike group are integrated properly as we move forward,” Rear Admiral Charles Williams said in a statement. — CONTINUED —
===============

US Navy deploys second aircraft carrier to North Korea’s doorstep
http://www.jokpeme.com/2017/05/us-navy- … rrier.html

The US Navy is moving a second aircraft carrier to the Korean Peninsula to take part in training exercises days after North Korea conducted a “successful” ballistic missile test.
The nuclear-powered USS Ronald Reagan departed for the Korean Peninsula on Tuesday after undergoing a maintenance period and sea trials in its base in Japan, CNN reported. — CONTINUED —
===============

CVW-5 aircraft fly aboard USS Ronald Reagan for 2017 patrol
https://www.dvidshub.net/news/234446/cv … 017-patrol

WATERS SOUTH OF JAPAN – Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 completed embarkation aboard the Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), May 19.

Over the course of three days, nine squadrons from CVW-5 flew more than 70 aircraft onto the flight deck of Ronald Reagan to integrate with Carrier Strike Group Five for their 2017 Patrol. — CONTINUED —

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 19, 2017 12:40 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 18, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Are Concerns Over EMP Attack From North Korea Overblown?
https://www.thenewamerican.com/world-ne … -overblown

While the mainstream media is focusing most of its attention on North Korea’s missile tests, it is largely ignoring what some are calling the rogue nation’s real threat: using one or both of its two present satellites hovering over the United States to launch an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack instead.

One of those scoffing at the very idea of EMP attack from North Korea is Jeffrey Lewis, who blogs in favor of nonproliferation at his site “Arms Control Wonk.” On National Public Radio in April, Geoff Brumfiel asked him: “Could North Korea really do this?” Lewis laughed, responding, “This is the favorite nightmare scenario of a small group of very dedicated people.”

Dr. Peter Vincent Pry, chief of staff of the Congressional Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Attack, warned on Monday: “Although North Korea, Russia and China have all made nuclear threats against the United States recently, in the case of North Korea and Russia repeatedly, most analysts dismiss these as mere ‘bluster’ and ‘nuclear sabre rattling’, not to be taken seriously.” Pry disagrees.

Currently the executive director of the EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security, Pry has served on numerous congressional commissions, and prior to that he was an intelligence officer with the (CIA), responsible for analyzing Soviet and Russian nuclear strategy.

In March, Pry and James Woolsey, former director of the CIA, penned an op-ed at TheHill.com. They noted, first of all, that North Korea has the present capability of launching an EMP attack over the North American continent: “The notion that North Korea is testing A-Bombs and H-Bomb components but does not yet have the sophistication to miniaturize warheads and make reentry vehicles for missile delivery is absurd…. North Korea should be regarded as capable of delivering by satellite a small nuclear warhead, specially designed to make a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack against the United States. According to the Congressional EMP Commission, a single warhead delivered by North Korean satellite could black out the national electric grid and other life-sustaining critical infrastructures for over a year — killing 9 of 10 Americans by starvation and societal collapse.”

This brought an immediate response from Kyle Mizokami, a writer for Popular Mechanics. While admitting that North Korea does pose a nuclear threat to the United States, he said that an EMP attack killing 90 percent of the population “is not realistic.” Mizokami referred to one of many apocalyptic novels that have been spawned over such concerns, including one of the best known, William R. Forstchen’s 2011 science-fiction novel One Second After.

Fortschen’s novel, though fiction, was based squarely on (as noted in its endnotes) a 2004 report from the EMP Commission. From that report: “The high-altitude nuclear weapon-generated electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is one of a small number of threats that has the potential to hold our society seriously at risk and might result in defeat of our military forces…. The electromagnetic fields produced by weapons designed and deployed with the intent to produce EMP have a high likelihood of damaging electrical power systems, electronics, and information systems upon which American society depends. Their effects on dependent systems and infrastructures could be sufficient to qualify as catastrophic to the Nation.”

Presciently, the report added: “Terrorists or state actors may well calculate that, instead of destroying a city or military base, they may obtain the greatest political-military utility from one or more such weapons by using them — or threatening their use — in an EMP attack. The current vulnerability of US critical infrastructure can both invite and reward [such an] attack.”

Could North Korea be one of those “state actors”? James Oberg thinks so. Oberg, a former NASA and U.S. Space Command official and an expert on Russian and Chinese space programs, wrote in the Washington Examiner in February of a trip he made to North Korea back in 2012: “There have been fears expressed that North Korea might use a satellite to carry a small nuclear warhead into orbit and then detonate it over the United States for an EMP strike. These concerns seem extreme and require an astronomical scale of irrationality on the part of the regime. The most frightening aspect, I’ve come to realize, is that exactly such a scale of insanity is now evident in the rest of their ‘space program.’”

Like Pry, Oberg is no lightweight. His career spanned 22 years with NASA, where he specialized in orbital rendezvous. He has testified frequently before Congress, was a space correspondent for UPI, ABC, and MSNBC and is now a commentator for NBC News, the Discovery Channel, and the BBC.

Pry ended his article ominously: “Some analysts think the world is on the threshold of a ‘new nuclear age’ where Cold War rules and assumptions about deterrence no longer apply and the likelihood of nuclear use is greatly increasing. The first nation to use nuclear weapons today — even a rogue state like North Korea or Iran — will immediately become the most feared and most credible nuclear power in the world, a formidable force to be reckoned with, and perhaps the dominant actor in a new world order.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 18, 2017 9:30 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 18, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Are Concerns Over EMP Attack From North Korea Overblown?
https://www.thenewamerican.com/world-ne … -overblown

While the mainstream media is focusing most of its attention on North Korea’s missile tests, it is largely ignoring what some are calling the rogue nation’s real threat: using one or both of its two present satellites hovering over the United States to launch an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack instead.

One of those scoffing at the very idea of EMP attack from North Korea is Jeffrey Lewis, who blogs in favor of nonproliferation at his site “Arms Control Wonk.” On National Public Radio in April, Geoff Brumfiel asked him: “Could North Korea really do this?” Lewis laughed, responding, “This is the favorite nightmare scenario of a small group of very dedicated people.”

Dr. Peter Vincent Pry, chief of staff of the Congressional Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Attack, warned on Monday: “Although North Korea, Russia and China have all made nuclear threats against the United States recently, in the case of North Korea and Russia repeatedly, most analysts dismiss these as mere ‘bluster’ and ‘nuclear sabre rattling’, not to be taken seriously.” Pry disagrees.

Currently the executive director of the EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security, Pry has served on numerous congressional commissions, and prior to that he was an intelligence officer with the (CIA), responsible for analyzing Soviet and Russian nuclear strategy.

In March, Pry and James Woolsey, former director of the CIA, penned an op-ed at TheHill.com. They noted, first of all, that North Korea has the present capability of launching an EMP attack over the North American continent: “The notion that North Korea is testing A-Bombs and H-Bomb components but does not yet have the sophistication to miniaturize warheads and make reentry vehicles for missile delivery is absurd…. North Korea should be regarded as capable of delivering by satellite a small nuclear warhead, specially designed to make a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack against the United States. According to the Congressional EMP Commission, a single warhead delivered by North Korean satellite could black out the national electric grid and other life-sustaining critical infrastructures for over a year — killing 9 of 10 Americans by starvation and societal collapse.”

This brought an immediate response from Kyle Mizokami, a writer for Popular Mechanics. While admitting that North Korea does pose a nuclear threat to the United States, he said that an EMP attack killing 90 percent of the population “is not realistic.” Mizokami referred to one of many apocalyptic novels that have been spawned over such concerns, including one of the best known, William R. Forstchen’s 2011 science-fiction novel One Second After.

Fortschen’s novel, though fiction, was based squarely on (as noted in its endnotes) a 2004 report from the EMP Commission. From that report: “The high-altitude nuclear weapon-generated electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is one of a small number of threats that has the potential to hold our society seriously at risk and might result in defeat of our military forces…. The electromagnetic fields produced by weapons designed and deployed with the intent to produce EMP have a high likelihood of damaging electrical power systems, electronics, and information systems upon which American society depends. Their effects on dependent systems and infrastructures could be sufficient to qualify as catastrophic to the Nation.”

Presciently, the report added: “Terrorists or state actors may well calculate that, instead of destroying a city or military base, they may obtain the greatest political-military utility from one or more such weapons by using them — or threatening their use — in an EMP attack. The current vulnerability of US critical infrastructure can both invite and reward [such an] attack.”

Could North Korea be one of those “state actors”? James Oberg thinks so. Oberg, a former NASA and U.S. Space Command official and an expert on Russian and Chinese space programs, wrote in the Washington Examiner in February of a trip he made to North Korea back in 2012: “There have been fears expressed that North Korea might use a satellite to carry a small nuclear warhead into orbit and then detonate it over the United States for an EMP strike. These concerns seem extreme and require an astronomical scale of irrationality on the part of the regime. The most frightening aspect, I’ve come to realize, is that exactly such a scale of insanity is now evident in the rest of their ‘space program.’”

Like Pry, Oberg is no lightweight. His career spanned 22 years with NASA, where he specialized in orbital rendezvous. He has testified frequently before Congress, was a space correspondent for UPI, ABC, and MSNBC and is now a commentator for NBC News, the Discovery Channel, and the BBC.

Pry ended his article ominously: “Some analysts think the world is on the threshold of a ‘new nuclear age’ where Cold War rules and assumptions about deterrence no longer apply and the likelihood of nuclear use is greatly increasing. The first nation to use nuclear weapons today — even a rogue state like North Korea or Iran — will immediately become the most feared and most credible nuclear power in the world, a formidable force to be reckoned with, and perhaps the dominant actor in a new world order.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 18, 2017 9:30 am


No Picture

Food & Water • Re: WHEAT – Price per pound?

May 17, 2017 ReadyMom 0
IceFire wrote:
Hard wheat has a higher protein content than soft wheat and rises better, which is why it is preferred for bread. “All-Purpose” flour is a combination of hard and soft wheats. In order to make all-purpose or soft wheat more suitable for making bread, you can add “Vital Wheat Gluten” to boost the protein content and allow it to rise better.

Didn’t know what Vital Wheat Gluten was, so looked it up: -k

How Long Will Vital Wheat Gluten Last?
http://www.livestrong.com/article/34071 … uten-last/

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed May 17, 2017 9:12 am


No Picture

Food & Water • Re: WHEAT – Price per pound?

May 17, 2017 ReadyMom 0
IceFire wrote:
Hard wheat has a higher protein content than soft wheat and rises better, which is why it is preferred for bread. “All-Purpose” flour is a combination of hard and soft wheats. In order to make all-purpose or soft wheat more suitable for making bread, you can add “Vital Wheat Gluten” to boost the protein content and allow it to rise better.

Didn’t know what Vital Wheat Gluten was, so looked it up: -k

How Long Will Vital Wheat Gluten Last?
http://www.livestrong.com/article/34071 … uten-last/

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Wed May 17, 2017 9:12 am


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 17, 2017 ReadyMom 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Ain’t real hard. I stapled nylon screen to frames. Place sliced veggies on screen, sit in sunshine. Take off when dry.

Not rocket science.

The Indians had this figured out long ago. Kill deer. cut into thin strips. Possibly dip into salt, hang to dry.

Doesn’t the fruit go ‘rotten’, before it dries? We live with our backyard in a good southern exposure. LOTS of direct sun w/out trees in part of it. I’d love to try this, to see how well it works. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 16, 2017 9:37 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 17, 2017 ReadyMom 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Ain’t real hard. I stapled nylon screen to frames. Place sliced veggies on screen, sit in sunshine. Take off when dry.

Not rocket science.

The Indians had this figured out long ago. Kill deer. cut into thin strips. Possibly dip into salt, hang to dry.

Doesn’t the fruit go ‘rotten’, before it dries? We live with our backyard in a good southern exposure. LOTS of direct sun w/out trees in part of it. I’d love to try this, to see how well it works. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 16, 2017 9:37 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 14, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea launches missile; launch being assessed
http://abcnews.go.com/International/nor … d=47395655

North Korea launched a missile today, a U.S. official said, confirming reports in South Korean media.

A U.S. official said the missile landed in the Sea of Japan after being launched from western North Korea. The type of missile launched today is still being assessed.

According to U.S. Pacific Command, the missile was launched near Kusung and landed in the Sea of Japan.

The type of missile is being assessed, but the flight was not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile, according to a statement from U.S. PACOM spokesman Major Rob Shuford.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) determined the missile launch from North Korea did not pose a threat to North America, the statement said.

A statement released late Saturday night by the White House said President Trump was “briefed on the latest missile test by North Korea.”

The statement also acknowledged the missile test’s close proximity to Russia: “With the missile impacting so close to Russian soil –- in fact, closer to Russia than to Japan –- the President cannot imagine that Russia is pleased.”

It continued, “North Korea has been a flagrant menace for far too long. South Korea and Japan have been watching this situation closely with us. The United States maintains our ironclad commitment to stand with our allies in the face of the serious threat posed by North Korea. Let this latest provocation serve as a call for all nations to implement far stronger sanctions against North Korea.”

The South Korean government said the launch occurred at 5:27 a.m. Sunday, local time, from the Kusong area in North Pyongan Province. The missile flew about 435 miles to the sea of Japan.

“Our military are closely monitoring North Korean forces’ trends and maintaining its readiness,” the South Korean statement said.

The launch — the seventh this year — comes only days after the inauguration of South Korea’s President Moon Jae-In, who has repeatedly hinted the new administration would prefer engagement and a softer approach on North Korea.

“Possibility of dialogue with North Korea is still open but we should react firmly against provocations so that North Korea would not misjudge (our intentions),” President Moon said after convening an emergency meeting of the country’s National Security Council.

And Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he and President Moon discussed by phone the missile test, while his top national security adviser also spoke with his U.S. counterpart. Abe told reporters Sunday that the launch, which is banned by the United Nations, is “absolutely unacceptable” and that Japan will respond resolutely.

“Japan is closely cooperating with the U.S. and South Korea,” Abe said, “and analyzing the situation as we firmly respond to the development.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Sat May 13, 2017 11:21 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 14, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea launches missile; launch being assessed
http://abcnews.go.com/International/nor … d=47395655

North Korea launched a missile today, a U.S. official said, confirming reports in South Korean media.

A U.S. official said the missile landed in the Sea of Japan after being launched from western North Korea. The type of missile launched today is still being assessed.

According to U.S. Pacific Command, the missile was launched near Kusung and landed in the Sea of Japan.

The type of missile is being assessed, but the flight was not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile, according to a statement from U.S. PACOM spokesman Major Rob Shuford.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) determined the missile launch from North Korea did not pose a threat to North America, the statement said.

A statement released late Saturday night by the White House said President Trump was “briefed on the latest missile test by North Korea.”

The statement also acknowledged the missile test’s close proximity to Russia: “With the missile impacting so close to Russian soil –- in fact, closer to Russia than to Japan –- the President cannot imagine that Russia is pleased.”

It continued, “North Korea has been a flagrant menace for far too long. South Korea and Japan have been watching this situation closely with us. The United States maintains our ironclad commitment to stand with our allies in the face of the serious threat posed by North Korea. Let this latest provocation serve as a call for all nations to implement far stronger sanctions against North Korea.”

The South Korean government said the launch occurred at 5:27 a.m. Sunday, local time, from the Kusong area in North Pyongan Province. The missile flew about 435 miles to the sea of Japan.

“Our military are closely monitoring North Korean forces’ trends and maintaining its readiness,” the South Korean statement said.

The launch — the seventh this year — comes only days after the inauguration of South Korea’s President Moon Jae-In, who has repeatedly hinted the new administration would prefer engagement and a softer approach on North Korea.

“Possibility of dialogue with North Korea is still open but we should react firmly against provocations so that North Korea would not misjudge (our intentions),” President Moon said after convening an emergency meeting of the country’s National Security Council.

And Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he and President Moon discussed by phone the missile test, while his top national security adviser also spoke with his U.S. counterpart. Abe told reporters Sunday that the launch, which is banned by the United Nations, is “absolutely unacceptable” and that Japan will respond resolutely.

“Japan is closely cooperating with the U.S. and South Korea,” Abe said, “and analyzing the situation as we firmly respond to the development.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Sat May 13, 2017 11:21 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 9, 2017 ReadyMom 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:

ReadyMom wrote:You need to listen to Dr. Peter Fry’s interview here: http://scotthelmer.com/radioshow/shows/2017/05/07

OR … did your read the latest thing I posted just 2 posts up? -k

I was just pointing out that NK might not need to loft anything new, they may already have a bomb in orbit awaiting a signal to start the countdown.

The fact that the secretive air force shuttle just landed just adds to my concern, but adds some hope. Maybe they are outfitting it with something to deal with rogue satellites on the sly? No reason to break more treaties than we have to, but the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 leaves a lot of wiggle room for weapons in space.

I hadn’t listened to the radio show, and I’m trying to get through it but almost 3 hours is a bit much to listen to while I’m at work. :blush: That said, I have read your messages. I was just trying to point out to Rod that NK has already shown its ability to loft items of the required size and to the required altitude, or that they may have already done so.

reference:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_Space_Treaty

Sorry … when I read your post, I thought maybe you missed my last post. And you’re right … I had to give it 2 attempts to listen and even then I didn’t stay through to the bitter end. Almost. But not quite! -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 09, 2017 12:00 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 9, 2017 ReadyMom 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:

ReadyMom wrote:You need to listen to Dr. Peter Fry’s interview here: http://scotthelmer.com/radioshow/shows/2017/05/07

OR … did your read the latest thing I posted just 2 posts up? -k

I was just pointing out that NK might not need to loft anything new, they may already have a bomb in orbit awaiting a signal to start the countdown.

The fact that the secretive air force shuttle just landed just adds to my concern, but adds some hope. Maybe they are outfitting it with something to deal with rogue satellites on the sly? No reason to break more treaties than we have to, but the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 leaves a lot of wiggle room for weapons in space.

I hadn’t listened to the radio show, and I’m trying to get through it but almost 3 hours is a bit much to listen to while I’m at work. :blush: That said, I have read your messages. I was just trying to point out to Rod that NK has already shown its ability to loft items of the required size and to the required altitude, or that they may have already done so.

reference:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_Space_Treaty

Sorry … when I read your post, I thought maybe you missed my last post. And you’re right … I had to give it 2 attempts to listen and even then I didn’t stay through to the bitter end. Almost. But not quite! -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 09, 2017 12:00 pm


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 9, 2017 ReadyMom 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:

Rod wrote:All they have to do is get a device, that can be remotely detonated, into low orbit.

Like in a satellite?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwangmyŏngsŏng_program

Yeah, they have two up there right now…but who knows what’s actually in those satellites. Hopefully if President Trump decides to take military action in NK that he has the air force destroy the satellites at the same time…hit them with a missile, fry them with x-rays, put a bucket of nails in a crossing trajectory, doesn’t matter how, just that they are disabled in case they have an EMP device in them…otherwise things could get quite ugly here in the homeland. :eek:

You need to listen to Dr. Peter Fry’s interview here: http://scotthelmer.com/radioshow/shows/2017/05/07

OR … did your read the latest thing I posted just 2 posts up? -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Tue May 09, 2017 9:03 am


:wave:

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 8, 2017 ReadyMom 0

EXCLUSIVE – Congressional Expert: North Korea Prepping EMP Catastrophe Aimed At U.S. Homefront
http://www.breitbart.com/jerusalem/2017 … homefront/

TEL AVIV – While the international community and news media focus on North Korean missile tests and the country’s nuclear program, one expert warned on Sunday that North Korea may be secretly assembling the capability to take out significant parts of the U.S. homeland via an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack.

Dr. Peter Vincent Pry is executive director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security and is the chief of staff of the Congressional EMP Commission.

Speaking on this reporter’s talk radio program, Pry pointed to two North Korean satellites that are currently orbiting the U.S. at trajectories he says are optimized for a surprised EMP attack. “Aaron Klein Investigative Radio” is broadcast on terrestrial radio on New York’s AM 970 The Answer and NewsTalk 990 AM in Philadelphia and online.

Pry was referring to the KMS 3-2 and KMS-4 earth observation satellites launched by North Korea in April 2012 and February 2016 respectively.

He warned: “They are positioning themselves as sort of a nuclear missile age, cyberage version of the battleship diplomacy in my view. So that they can always have one of them (satellites) very close to being over the United States or over the United States.

“Then if a crisis comes up and if we decide to attack North Korea, Kim Jong Un can threaten our president and say, ‘Well, don’t do that because we are going to burn your whole country down.’ Which is basically what he said. I mean, he has made threats about turning the United States into ashes and he connected the satellite program to this in public statements to deter us from attacking.”

“If you wanted to win a New Korean war,” added Pry, “one of the things you would certainly consider doing is taking out the United States homeland itself.”

Pry surmised the North Koreans may be taking the idea from a Soviet plan during the Cold War to attack the U.S. with an EMP as part of a larger surprise assault aimed at crippling the U.S. military.

“During the Cold War, the Russians had a secret weapon they called a fractional orbital bombardment system,” he explained. “And the idea was to do a surprise EMP attack against the United States by disguising a warhead as a satellite. Because a satellite trajectory is different from an ICBM trajectory that is aiming to go into a city. You know, for accuracy on an ICBM you launch it on a lower energy, 45-degree angle that follows a classic ballistic trajectory. Like a rifle. To land your missile on a city.”

Pry continued of the original Russian plan:

        But if you put a satellite in orbit it follows a different trajectory. It doesn’t have accuracy but it puts the satellite up there so that it stays in permanent orbit so it looks different in terms of the trajectory. And guys watching their radar screens tend not to get alarmed when they see a missile being launched on that satellite trajectory. Because they assume it is for peaceful purposes. …

        So, the idea was to put a nuclear weapon on a satellite. Launch it on a satellite trajectory toward the south so it is also flying away from the United States. Orbit it over the South Pole and come up on the other side of the earth so that it approaches us from the south.

        Because we didn’t during the Cold War and even today we still don’t have ballistic missile early radar warnings looking south. We don’t have any national missile defenses to the south. We are blind and defenseless to the south. We can’t see anything coming from that direction. Then when this gets over the United States you light it off so that it does an EMP attack.

Pry stated that in the Soviet plan, “They were mainly interested in paralyzing our strategic forces, our strategic command and control and communications so that we couldn’t talk to our forces. Maybe take out some of the forces themselves. And that would give them time to then launch their mass attack across the North Pole to blow up our ICBMs. So, kill them once with the EMP. Kill them twice by blasting our bases by using their long-range missiles. That was the Russian plan. But the cutting edge of the plan was this surprise EMP attack.”

North Korea, by contrast, “doesn’t have enough missiles or sophisticated missiles to blow up our missile bases and bomber bases. What they seem to be doing with the satellites is the EMP part of the Soviet plan.”

“I think what they are mainly going for is the unhardened electric grid,” Pry surmised. “Transportation, communications, all of the other civilian critical infrastructure that we depend upon to keep our population alive.”

Pry spotlighted recent North Korean nuclear and missile tests minimized by the news media for reported failures. When viewed through the lens of potential preparations for an EMP attack, Pry warned, the tests were actually successes.

Pry wrote about some of those tests in a Newsmax piece last week:

        I am looking at an unclassified U.S. Government chart that shows a 10-kiloton warhead (the power of the Hiroshima A-Bomb) detonated at an altitude of 70 kilometers will generate an EMP field inflicting upset and damage on unprotected electronics. …

        On April 30, South Korean officials told The Korea Times and YTN TV that North Korea’s test of a medium-range missile on April 29 was not a failure, as widely reported in the world press, because it was deliberately detonated at 72 kilometers altitude. 72 kilometers is the optimum burst height for a 10-Kt warhead making an EMP attack. …

        According to South Korean officials, “It’s believed the explosion was a test to develop a nuclear weapon different from existing ones.” Japan’s Tetsuro Kosaka writes in Nikkei, “Pyongyang could be saying, ‘We could launch an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack if things get really ugly.’”

“The April 29 missile launch looks suspiciously like practice for an EMP attack,” Pry wrote. “The missile was fired on a lofted trajectory, to maximize, not range, but climbing to high-altitude as quickly as possible, where it was successfully fused and detonated — testing everything but an actual nuclear warhead.”

This weekend, an editorial published in the North Korean state-run media agency KNCA threatened the White House would be “reduced to ashes.”

The same news agency warned last week that “any military provocation against the DPRK will precisely mean a total war which will lead to the final doom of the US.” DPRK stands for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or North Korea.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 08, 2017 3:19 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 8, 2017 ReadyMom 0

EXCLUSIVE – Congressional Expert: North Korea Prepping EMP Catastrophe Aimed At U.S. Homefront
http://www.breitbart.com/jerusalem/2017 … homefront/

TEL AVIV – While the international community and news media focus on North Korean missile tests and the country’s nuclear program, one expert warned on Sunday that North Korea may be secretly assembling the capability to take out significant parts of the U.S. homeland via an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack.

Dr. Peter Vincent Pry is executive director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security and is the chief of staff of the Congressional EMP Commission.

Speaking on this reporter’s talk radio program, Pry pointed to two North Korean satellites that are currently orbiting the U.S. at trajectories he says are optimized for a surprised EMP attack. “Aaron Klein Investigative Radio” is broadcast on terrestrial radio on New York’s AM 970 The Answer and NewsTalk 990 AM in Philadelphia and online.

Pry was referring to the KMS 3-2 and KMS-4 earth observation satellites launched by North Korea in April 2012 and February 2016 respectively.

He warned: “They are positioning themselves as sort of a nuclear missile age, cyberage version of the battleship diplomacy in my view. So that they can always have one of them (satellites) very close to being over the United States or over the United States.

“Then if a crisis comes up and if we decide to attack North Korea, Kim Jong Un can threaten our president and say, ‘Well, don’t do that because we are going to burn your whole country down.’ Which is basically what he said. I mean, he has made threats about turning the United States into ashes and he connected the satellite program to this in public statements to deter us from attacking.”

“If you wanted to win a New Korean war,” added Pry, “one of the things you would certainly consider doing is taking out the United States homeland itself.”

Pry surmised the North Koreans may be taking the idea from a Soviet plan during the Cold War to attack the U.S. with an EMP as part of a larger surprise assault aimed at crippling the U.S. military.

“During the Cold War, the Russians had a secret weapon they called a fractional orbital bombardment system,” he explained. “And the idea was to do a surprise EMP attack against the United States by disguising a warhead as a satellite. Because a satellite trajectory is different from an ICBM trajectory that is aiming to go into a city. You know, for accuracy on an ICBM you launch it on a lower energy, 45-degree angle that follows a classic ballistic trajectory. Like a rifle. To land your missile on a city.”

Pry continued of the original Russian plan:

        But if you put a satellite in orbit it follows a different trajectory. It doesn’t have accuracy but it puts the satellite up there so that it stays in permanent orbit so it looks different in terms of the trajectory. And guys watching their radar screens tend not to get alarmed when they see a missile being launched on that satellite trajectory. Because they assume it is for peaceful purposes. …

        So, the idea was to put a nuclear weapon on a satellite. Launch it on a satellite trajectory toward the south so it is also flying away from the United States. Orbit it over the South Pole and come up on the other side of the earth so that it approaches us from the south.

        Because we didn’t during the Cold War and even today we still don’t have ballistic missile early radar warnings looking south. We don’t have any national missile defenses to the south. We are blind and defenseless to the south. We can’t see anything coming from that direction. Then when this gets over the United States you light it off so that it does an EMP attack.

Pry stated that in the Soviet plan, “They were mainly interested in paralyzing our strategic forces, our strategic command and control and communications so that we couldn’t talk to our forces. Maybe take out some of the forces themselves. And that would give them time to then launch their mass attack across the North Pole to blow up our ICBMs. So, kill them once with the EMP. Kill them twice by blasting our bases by using their long-range missiles. That was the Russian plan. But the cutting edge of the plan was this surprise EMP attack.”

North Korea, by contrast, “doesn’t have enough missiles or sophisticated missiles to blow up our missile bases and bomber bases. What they seem to be doing with the satellites is the EMP part of the Soviet plan.”

“I think what they are mainly going for is the unhardened electric grid,” Pry surmised. “Transportation, communications, all of the other civilian critical infrastructure that we depend upon to keep our population alive.”

Pry spotlighted recent North Korean nuclear and missile tests minimized by the news media for reported failures. When viewed through the lens of potential preparations for an EMP attack, Pry warned, the tests were actually successes.

Pry wrote about some of those tests in a Newsmax piece last week:

        I am looking at an unclassified U.S. Government chart that shows a 10-kiloton warhead (the power of the Hiroshima A-Bomb) detonated at an altitude of 70 kilometers will generate an EMP field inflicting upset and damage on unprotected electronics. …

        On April 30, South Korean officials told The Korea Times and YTN TV that North Korea’s test of a medium-range missile on April 29 was not a failure, as widely reported in the world press, because it was deliberately detonated at 72 kilometers altitude. 72 kilometers is the optimum burst height for a 10-Kt warhead making an EMP attack. …

        According to South Korean officials, “It’s believed the explosion was a test to develop a nuclear weapon different from existing ones.” Japan’s Tetsuro Kosaka writes in Nikkei, “Pyongyang could be saying, ‘We could launch an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack if things get really ugly.’”

“The April 29 missile launch looks suspiciously like practice for an EMP attack,” Pry wrote. “The missile was fired on a lofted trajectory, to maximize, not range, but climbing to high-altitude as quickly as possible, where it was successfully fused and detonated — testing everything but an actual nuclear warhead.”

This weekend, an editorial published in the North Korean state-run media agency KNCA threatened the White House would be “reduced to ashes.”

The same news agency warned last week that “any military provocation against the DPRK will precisely mean a total war which will lead to the final doom of the US.” DPRK stands for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or North Korea.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon May 08, 2017 3:19 pm


No Picture

Radio Shows and Podcasts • Re: Dr Peter Pry: SUNDAY NIGHT!

May 8, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Listening to this and it’s pretty good. Missed the first half, because our son has been home for a quick visit and leaving in a few hours. During the 2nd hour, he’s talking about the NK ‘failed’ missile attempts. He seems to think that they have been EMP practices and NOT long-range missile practices. He also mentioned another attempt, yesterday. I hadn’t heard about that. If I heard him correctly, he believes this was an EMP practice, also. I’m hoping there is an archived copy of this interview to access, after tonight. -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Sun May 07, 2017 11:18 pm


No Picture

Radio Shows and Podcasts • Dr Peter Pry: SUNDAY NIGHT!

May 7, 2017 ReadyMom 0

http://scotthelmer.com/radioshow/shows/2017/05/07

The Scott Helmer Show • LISTEN LIVE
AIR DATE & TIME: Sunday, May 7, 2017, at 11 pm ET/ 8 pm PT
GUEST: Dr. Peter Vincent Pry • EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security and Family Security Matters

Dr. Peter Vincent Pry is Executive Director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security and Director of the U.S. Nuclear Strategy Forum, both Congressional Advisory Boards, and served on the Congressional EMP Commission, the Congressional Strategic Posture Commission, the House Armed Services Committee, and the CIA. He is the author of Apocalypse Unknown: The Struggle To Protect America From An Electromagnetic Pulse Catastrophe and Electric Armageddon, both available from CreateSpace.com and Amazon.com.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Sun May 07, 2017 6:26 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMPs (Electro Magnetic Pulse)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Energy Panel Weighs Efforts to Defend Against EMPs
https://www.rtoinsider.com/electromagne … emp-42544/

May 4, 2017

By Wayne Barber

WASHINGTON — Senate witnesses agreed Thursday that the threat posed by electromagnetic pulse attacks is a major concern but differed on the adequacy of public and private efforts to protect the electric grid.

The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee heard testimony from six witnesses on EMPs, policy options for protecting energy infrastructure and improving capabilities for restoring the system after an attack.

Chair Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said there is heightened concern over the threat of EMPs — blasts of electromagnetic energy from a nuclear weapon that can disrupt or destroy microprocessors and other electronic devices — because of the potential spread of nuclear weapons to nations such as North Korea and the ubiquity of electronics.

“This has magnified the impact, as compared to the potential impact in the 1960s, that an EMP burst could now have on the electric grid, the technologies that rely on electronics and our daily lives,” she said.

The broad discussion also veered into risks associated with cyberattacks as well as naturally occurring geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs).

Bleak Picture

The bleakest pictures were painted by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Ambassador Henry F. Cooper, a Ph.D. engineer and former director of the Defense Department’s Strategic Defense Initiative.

Cooper said that most federal and state efforts to safeguard the electric system against low-probability, high-risk attacks have been “grossly inadequate.” He said the U.S. government has not devoted enough attention to EMP attacks that are “known to be included in the doctrine and planning of Russia, China, North Korea and Iran.”

Because no defense is perfect, Cooper said more effort should be made to “harden” critical infrastructure against “the full complement of threats.”

Gingrich said that while North America has done an excellent job of developing an efficient electric grid, this efficiency makes it inherently “fragile.”

A widespread grid failure that lasts a long time could be more damaging than the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Gingrich said. The former congressman, who wrote about the threat in a 2011 book, “To Save America,” alluded to the possibility of hospitals having patients die for lack of clean water and other services.

“Here we are gambling with our civilization,” Gingrich said. He also cited NASA research that he said suggests Earth could be overdue for a major solar storm that could disrupt much of the grid.

Government is on the Case

While the domestic electric grid is a “complex ecosystem” where disruptions can cascade, much work has been done to safeguard the power system, said Caitlin Durkovich of strategic consulting and advisory firm Toffler Associates.

“There is no doubt we live in a dangerous world,” said Durkovich, the Department of Homeland Security’s assistant secretary for infrastructure protection under President Barack Obama. “The bottom line is the risk to digital and physical infrastructure has grown and our critical infrastructure is more vulnerable than it was a few decades ago,” Durkovich said.

“I want to be clear: We have not ignored the threat of an EMP,” Durkovich told the committee.

Sen. Jim Risch (R-Idaho) also defended the government’s efforts to protect the grid. “These issues have not been ignored by the United States,” Risch said.

But many of the defense efforts are not something that can be discussed in public sessions, Risch said. At the same time, “there is not enough money in the world to protect us 100%,” he added.

FERC, EPRI Recap Ongoing efforts

Acting FERC Chair Cheryl LaFleur offered a rundown of FERC’s and NERC’s efforts to protect against grid disruptions.

The subject of EMP and GMD events have been the topic of “significant scientific research and debate, as well as broad discussion among regulators, elected officials, industry and other stakeholders,” LaFleur said.

In 2014, FERC directed NERC to develop a reliability standard that addresses physical security threats. (See FERC Nixes Gov’t Veto Power from NERC Physical Security Standard.) Last September, FERC approved a NERC reliability standard requiring grid operators to assess and protect against the threat of geomagnetic disturbances. (See FERC Approves GMD Reliability Standard.)

“As noted above, the GMD and physical security standards help provide protection against particular aspects of the EMP threat,” LaFleur said. “However, FERC has not directed NERC to develop a standard specifically targeting EMP. To be clear, I believe this is the result of reasoned consideration of the issue.”

Robin Manning, the Electric Power Research Institute’s vice president for transmission and distribution, briefed the Senate panel on his organization’s research on GMDs, EMPs and “high-altitude EMP” (HEMP) events.

“EPRI has been researching GMD for many years, with significant applications now implemented across the electric industry,” Manning said. “Implications and solutions for EMP and HEMP are less understood. Much of the available information is not specifically applied to electric utilities, making it very difficult for utilities and regulators to understand effective options for protecting energy infrastructure,” Manning said.

Lincoln Electric System CEO Kevin Wailes, co-chair of the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council, testified on behalf of the American Public Power Association.

Wailes said he is skeptical of suggestions in some quarters that the power sector “fully ‘gold plate” the entire grid so it could “theoretically, at least partially survive a high altitude nuclear event.” There is no consensus on what measures should be taken or how effective or costly they might prove, Wailes said.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:47 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMPs (Electro Magnetic Pulse)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Energy Panel Weighs Efforts to Defend Against EMPs
https://www.rtoinsider.com/electromagne … emp-42544/

May 4, 2017

By Wayne Barber

WASHINGTON — Senate witnesses agreed Thursday that the threat posed by electromagnetic pulse attacks is a major concern but differed on the adequacy of public and private efforts to protect the electric grid.

The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee heard testimony from six witnesses on EMPs, policy options for protecting energy infrastructure and improving capabilities for restoring the system after an attack.

Chair Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said there is heightened concern over the threat of EMPs — blasts of electromagnetic energy from a nuclear weapon that can disrupt or destroy microprocessors and other electronic devices — because of the potential spread of nuclear weapons to nations such as North Korea and the ubiquity of electronics.

“This has magnified the impact, as compared to the potential impact in the 1960s, that an EMP burst could now have on the electric grid, the technologies that rely on electronics and our daily lives,” she said.

The broad discussion also veered into risks associated with cyberattacks as well as naturally occurring geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs).

Bleak Picture

The bleakest pictures were painted by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Ambassador Henry F. Cooper, a Ph.D. engineer and former director of the Defense Department’s Strategic Defense Initiative.

Cooper said that most federal and state efforts to safeguard the electric system against low-probability, high-risk attacks have been “grossly inadequate.” He said the U.S. government has not devoted enough attention to EMP attacks that are “known to be included in the doctrine and planning of Russia, China, North Korea and Iran.”

Because no defense is perfect, Cooper said more effort should be made to “harden” critical infrastructure against “the full complement of threats.”

Gingrich said that while North America has done an excellent job of developing an efficient electric grid, this efficiency makes it inherently “fragile.”

A widespread grid failure that lasts a long time could be more damaging than the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Gingrich said. The former congressman, who wrote about the threat in a 2011 book, “To Save America,” alluded to the possibility of hospitals having patients die for lack of clean water and other services.

“Here we are gambling with our civilization,” Gingrich said. He also cited NASA research that he said suggests Earth could be overdue for a major solar storm that could disrupt much of the grid.

Government is on the Case

While the domestic electric grid is a “complex ecosystem” where disruptions can cascade, much work has been done to safeguard the power system, said Caitlin Durkovich of strategic consulting and advisory firm Toffler Associates.

“There is no doubt we live in a dangerous world,” said Durkovich, the Department of Homeland Security’s assistant secretary for infrastructure protection under President Barack Obama. “The bottom line is the risk to digital and physical infrastructure has grown and our critical infrastructure is more vulnerable than it was a few decades ago,” Durkovich said.

“I want to be clear: We have not ignored the threat of an EMP,” Durkovich told the committee.

Sen. Jim Risch (R-Idaho) also defended the government’s efforts to protect the grid. “These issues have not been ignored by the United States,” Risch said.

But many of the defense efforts are not something that can be discussed in public sessions, Risch said. At the same time, “there is not enough money in the world to protect us 100%,” he added.

FERC, EPRI Recap Ongoing efforts

Acting FERC Chair Cheryl LaFleur offered a rundown of FERC’s and NERC’s efforts to protect against grid disruptions.

The subject of EMP and GMD events have been the topic of “significant scientific research and debate, as well as broad discussion among regulators, elected officials, industry and other stakeholders,” LaFleur said.

In 2014, FERC directed NERC to develop a reliability standard that addresses physical security threats. (See FERC Nixes Gov’t Veto Power from NERC Physical Security Standard.) Last September, FERC approved a NERC reliability standard requiring grid operators to assess and protect against the threat of geomagnetic disturbances. (See FERC Approves GMD Reliability Standard.)

“As noted above, the GMD and physical security standards help provide protection against particular aspects of the EMP threat,” LaFleur said. “However, FERC has not directed NERC to develop a standard specifically targeting EMP. To be clear, I believe this is the result of reasoned consideration of the issue.”

Robin Manning, the Electric Power Research Institute’s vice president for transmission and distribution, briefed the Senate panel on his organization’s research on GMDs, EMPs and “high-altitude EMP” (HEMP) events.

“EPRI has been researching GMD for many years, with significant applications now implemented across the electric industry,” Manning said. “Implications and solutions for EMP and HEMP are less understood. Much of the available information is not specifically applied to electric utilities, making it very difficult for utilities and regulators to understand effective options for protecting energy infrastructure,” Manning said.

Lincoln Electric System CEO Kevin Wailes, co-chair of the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council, testified on behalf of the American Public Power Association.

Wailes said he is skeptical of suggestions in some quarters that the power sector “fully ‘gold plate” the entire grid so it could “theoretically, at least partially survive a high altitude nuclear event.” There is no consensus on what measures should be taken or how effective or costly they might prove, Wailes said.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:47 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Image
Iran, North Korea Could Attack US With EMP
https://sputniknews.com/military/201705 … ttack-usa/

Former Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense program, Henry Cooper claims that Iran and North Korea could place a satellite in orbit with a nuclear payload to unleash an electromagnetic pulse that could destroy the US power grid and most electronic devices.

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Iran and North Korea could place a satellite in orbit with a nuclear payload to unleash an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) that could destroy the US power grid and most electronic devices, former Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense program, Henry Cooper, said in congressional testimony.

      “Both nations could deliver an EMP attack on the United States by simply detonating a nuclear weapon carried by one of their satellites as it passes over the United States,” Cooper stated before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Thursday.

The EMP weapon would require no hardened re-entry vehicle or accurate guidance system as with an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). Moreover, both Iran and North Korea have successfully launched satellites into orbit, Cooper explained.

The cyber threat would come from a power surge generated by the EMP phenomenon, Cooper and a panel of scientists told the committee.

While there would be no immediate impact on humans, damage could require replacement of much of the power grid and billions of electronic devices, according to well-documented studies that date back to US nuclear tests in the 1950s.

      “I believe we have had clear warning of the nature of this threat for years, and are collectively continuing to ignore and/or take ineffective countermeasures to deal with it,” Cooper warned in a prepared text of his testimony. “We are essentially defenseless against this plausible threat.”

Moreover, satellite-based EMP attacks are known to be included in the military planning doctrines of Russia, China, North Korea and Iran, Cooper said.

Cooper urged the federal government to base existing missile defense systems along the Gulf of Mexico coast, which would be capable of destroying satellites in polar orbits that approach the United States from the South. But he admitted the prospect of doing so is remote.

Cooper now works on projects with regional power companies in the United States to harden key sights against the threat of electromagnetic radiation, having given up on “top-down” efforts to persuade federal officials to address the threat.

In the Reagan administration, Cooper served as chief of the Strategic Defense Initiative, a proposed a ground- and space-based missile shield targeting the former Soviet Union, and he continued to supervise missile-defense development throughout the administration of President George H.W. Bush.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:44 am


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Image
Iran, North Korea Could Attack US With EMP
https://sputniknews.com/military/201705 … ttack-usa/

Former Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense program, Henry Cooper claims that Iran and North Korea could place a satellite in orbit with a nuclear payload to unleash an electromagnetic pulse that could destroy the US power grid and most electronic devices.

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Iran and North Korea could place a satellite in orbit with a nuclear payload to unleash an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) that could destroy the US power grid and most electronic devices, former Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense program, Henry Cooper, said in congressional testimony.

      “Both nations could deliver an EMP attack on the United States by simply detonating a nuclear weapon carried by one of their satellites as it passes over the United States,” Cooper stated before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Thursday.

The EMP weapon would require no hardened re-entry vehicle or accurate guidance system as with an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). Moreover, both Iran and North Korea have successfully launched satellites into orbit, Cooper explained.

The cyber threat would come from a power surge generated by the EMP phenomenon, Cooper and a panel of scientists told the committee.

While there would be no immediate impact on humans, damage could require replacement of much of the power grid and billions of electronic devices, according to well-documented studies that date back to US nuclear tests in the 1950s.

      “I believe we have had clear warning of the nature of this threat for years, and are collectively continuing to ignore and/or take ineffective countermeasures to deal with it,” Cooper warned in a prepared text of his testimony. “We are essentially defenseless against this plausible threat.”

Moreover, satellite-based EMP attacks are known to be included in the military planning doctrines of Russia, China, North Korea and Iran, Cooper said.

Cooper urged the federal government to base existing missile defense systems along the Gulf of Mexico coast, which would be capable of destroying satellites in polar orbits that approach the United States from the South. But he admitted the prospect of doing so is remote.

Cooper now works on projects with regional power companies in the United States to harden key sights against the threat of electromagnetic radiation, having given up on “top-down” efforts to persuade federal officials to address the threat.

In the Reagan administration, Cooper served as chief of the Strategic Defense Initiative, a proposed a ground- and space-based missile shield targeting the former Soviet Union, and he continued to supervise missile-defense development throughout the administration of President George H.W. Bush.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:44 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Image
Iran, North Korea Could Attack US With EMP
https://sputniknews.com/military/201705 … ttack-usa/

Former Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense program, Henry Cooper claims that Iran and North Korea could place a satellite in orbit with a nuclear payload to unleash an electromagnetic pulse that could destroy the US power grid and most electronic devices.

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — Iran and North Korea could place a satellite in orbit with a nuclear payload to unleash an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) that could destroy the US power grid and most electronic devices, former Director of the Strategic Defense Initiative missile defense program, Henry Cooper, said in congressional testimony.

      “Both nations could deliver an EMP attack on the United States by simply detonating a nuclear weapon carried by one of their satellites as it passes over the United States,” Cooper stated before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Thursday.

The EMP weapon would require no hardened re-entry vehicle or accurate guidance system as with an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). Moreover, both Iran and North Korea have successfully launched satellites into orbit, Cooper explained.

The cyber threat would come from a power surge generated by the EMP phenomenon, Cooper and a panel of scientists told the committee.

While there would be no immediate impact on humans, damage could require replacement of much of the power grid and billions of electronic devices, according to well-documented studies that date back to US nuclear tests in the 1950s.

      “I believe we have had clear warning of the nature of this threat for years, and are collectively continuing to ignore and/or take ineffective countermeasures to deal with it,” Cooper warned in a prepared text of his testimony. “We are essentially defenseless against this plausible threat.”

Moreover, satellite-based EMP attacks are known to be included in the military planning doctrines of Russia, China, North Korea and Iran, Cooper said.

Cooper urged the federal government to base existing missile defense systems along the Gulf of Mexico coast, which would be capable of destroying satellites in polar orbits that approach the United States from the South. But he admitted the prospect of doing so is remote.

Cooper now works on projects with regional power companies in the United States to harden key sights against the threat of electromagnetic radiation, having given up on “top-down” efforts to persuade federal officials to address the threat.

In the Reagan administration, Cooper served as chief of the Strategic Defense Initiative, a proposed a ground- and space-based missile shield targeting the former Soviet Union, and he continued to supervise missile-defense development throughout the administration of President George H.W. Bush.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:44 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Today’s Headlines:

Image
North Korea warns China of ‘grave consequences’ in first direct rebuke to Beijing over criticism
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05 … ct-rebuke/

Neil Connor, Beijing
4 May 2017 • 9:44am

North Korea has warned China of “grave consequences” in a rare media rebuke which exposes growing divisions between the two historically close allies.

Beijing has shown increasing concern towards Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons programme over fears that it is prompting the United States, Japan and South Korea to build up their militaries in the region.

The North’s state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) took aim at “a string of absurd and reckless remarks” from Chinese media towards the regime’s nuclear ambitions.

“The DPRK will never beg for the maintenance of friendship with China, risking its nuclear program which is as precious as its own life, no matter how valuable the friendship is,” the hard-hitting commentary said, referring to the country’s official name.

“China should no longer try to test the limits of the DPRK’s patience… (and) had better ponder over the grave consequences to be entailed by its reckless act of chopping down the pillar of the DPRK-China relations.”

The bylined article is the first to be published by Pyongyang’s official media to openly criticise Beijing in the same language that it commonly uses for traditional enemies, South Korea and the US.

It comes after KCNA published two editorials which vented anger at a “neighbouring country” for “dancing to the tune of others”, warning the unnamed nation that it would suffer “catastrophic consequences”.

Those commentaries were widely believed to be in response to China declaring in February that it would ban all coal imports from North Korea, cutting off a major source of finance for the regime.

China is North Korea’s only diplomatic ally and a key trading partner.

Ties between the two countries were cemented on the battlefield during the 1950-53 Korea War, when they were both allies.

Mao Tsetung, Communist China’s founding father, said the two nations were as close as “lips and teeth”, but relations have become strained in recent years.

Xi Jinping, the Chinese president, and Kim Jong-un, the young North Korean leader, have never met as leaders.

An editorial published on the website of China’s Global Times newspaper on Thursday hit back at KCNA’s commentary, describing it as “nothing more than a hyper-aggressive piece completely filled with nationalistic passion.”

The daily tabloid, which is also known for its nationalist content, added: “Pyongyang obviously is grappling with some form of irrational logic over its nuclear program.”

Tensions have been escalating in north east Asia amid fears that North Korea is planning to carry out a nuclear test which could provoke an angry response from US president Donald Trump.

Mr Trump, who sent an aircraft carrier group into the region, has indicated that US-China relations have improved in recent weeks, as Beijing pressures North Korea over its military.Screen Shot 2017-05-05 at 11.50.38 AM.png

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:40 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Today’s Headlines:

Image
North Korea warns China of ‘grave consequences’ in first direct rebuke to Beijing over criticism
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05 … ct-rebuke/

Neil Connor, Beijing
4 May 2017 • 9:44am

North Korea has warned China of “grave consequences” in a rare media rebuke which exposes growing divisions between the two historically close allies.

Beijing has shown increasing concern towards Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons programme over fears that it is prompting the United States, Japan and South Korea to build up their militaries in the region.

The North’s state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) took aim at “a string of absurd and reckless remarks” from Chinese media towards the regime’s nuclear ambitions.

“The DPRK will never beg for the maintenance of friendship with China, risking its nuclear program which is as precious as its own life, no matter how valuable the friendship is,” the hard-hitting commentary said, referring to the country’s official name.

“China should no longer try to test the limits of the DPRK’s patience… (and) had better ponder over the grave consequences to be entailed by its reckless act of chopping down the pillar of the DPRK-China relations.”

The bylined article is the first to be published by Pyongyang’s official media to openly criticise Beijing in the same language that it commonly uses for traditional enemies, South Korea and the US.

It comes after KCNA published two editorials which vented anger at a “neighbouring country” for “dancing to the tune of others”, warning the unnamed nation that it would suffer “catastrophic consequences”.

Those commentaries were widely believed to be in response to China declaring in February that it would ban all coal imports from North Korea, cutting off a major source of finance for the regime.

China is North Korea’s only diplomatic ally and a key trading partner.

Ties between the two countries were cemented on the battlefield during the 1950-53 Korea War, when they were both allies.

Mao Tsetung, Communist China’s founding father, said the two nations were as close as “lips and teeth”, but relations have become strained in recent years.

Xi Jinping, the Chinese president, and Kim Jong-un, the young North Korean leader, have never met as leaders.

An editorial published on the website of China’s Global Times newspaper on Thursday hit back at KCNA’s commentary, describing it as “nothing more than a hyper-aggressive piece completely filled with nationalistic passion.”

The daily tabloid, which is also known for its nationalist content, added: “Pyongyang obviously is grappling with some form of irrational logic over its nuclear program.”

Tensions have been escalating in north east Asia amid fears that North Korea is planning to carry out a nuclear test which could provoke an angry response from US president Donald Trump.

Mr Trump, who sent an aircraft carrier group into the region, has indicated that US-China relations have improved in recent weeks, as Beijing pressures North Korea over its military.Screen Shot 2017-05-05 at 11.50.38 AM.png

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:40 am


Image

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Today’s Headlines:

Image
North Korea warns China of ‘grave consequences’ in first direct rebuke to Beijing over criticism
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/05 … ct-rebuke/

Neil Connor, Beijing
4 May 2017 • 9:44am

North Korea has warned China of “grave consequences” in a rare media rebuke which exposes growing divisions between the two historically close allies.

Beijing has shown increasing concern towards Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons programme over fears that it is prompting the United States, Japan and South Korea to build up their militaries in the region.

The North’s state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) took aim at “a string of absurd and reckless remarks” from Chinese media towards the regime’s nuclear ambitions.

“The DPRK will never beg for the maintenance of friendship with China, risking its nuclear program which is as precious as its own life, no matter how valuable the friendship is,” the hard-hitting commentary said, referring to the country’s official name.

“China should no longer try to test the limits of the DPRK’s patience… (and) had better ponder over the grave consequences to be entailed by its reckless act of chopping down the pillar of the DPRK-China relations.”

The bylined article is the first to be published by Pyongyang’s official media to openly criticise Beijing in the same language that it commonly uses for traditional enemies, South Korea and the US.

It comes after KCNA published two editorials which vented anger at a “neighbouring country” for “dancing to the tune of others”, warning the unnamed nation that it would suffer “catastrophic consequences”.

Those commentaries were widely believed to be in response to China declaring in February that it would ban all coal imports from North Korea, cutting off a major source of finance for the regime.

China is North Korea’s only diplomatic ally and a key trading partner.

Ties between the two countries were cemented on the battlefield during the 1950-53 Korea War, when they were both allies.

Mao Tsetung, Communist China’s founding father, said the two nations were as close as “lips and teeth”, but relations have become strained in recent years.

Xi Jinping, the Chinese president, and Kim Jong-un, the young North Korean leader, have never met as leaders.

An editorial published on the website of China’s Global Times newspaper on Thursday hit back at KCNA’s commentary, describing it as “nothing more than a hyper-aggressive piece completely filled with nationalistic passion.”

The daily tabloid, which is also known for its nationalist content, added: “Pyongyang obviously is grappling with some form of irrational logic over its nuclear program.”

Tensions have been escalating in north east Asia amid fears that North Korea is planning to carry out a nuclear test which could provoke an angry response from US president Donald Trump.

Mr Trump, who sent an aircraft carrier group into the region, has indicated that US-China relations have improved in recent weeks, as Beijing pressures North Korea over its military.Screen Shot 2017-05-05 at 11.50.38 AM.png

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Fri May 05, 2017 10:40 am


No Picture

First Aid & Medicine • Book Needed: All About Antibiotics

May 5, 2017 ReadyMom 0

So, I’ve accumulated a good collection of basic antibiotics, from my shopping spree to Mexico. Now I need a good book to keep with those supplies that explains use, dose and everything else I need. So, I basically need an ‘everything you need to know’ book. Anyone have any recommendations for such a book? -k

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 04, 2017 8:21 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #2 (May 2017)

May 4, 2017 ReadyMom 0
dmwalsh568 wrote:
Another sign of deteriorating situation in the region:

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/05/n … 39856.html
North Korean state media lashes out at main ally China
In rare rebuke, N Korean news agency accuses China’s media of ‘dancing to the tune of the US’ amid rising tensions.

And, apparently China answered:

North Korea issued a rare statement attacking China — and China hit back
http://www.businessinsider.com/afp-nkor … =buffer-bi

SEOUL — North Korean and Chinese media were at loggerheads Thursday after Pyongyang’s official news agency issued a rare and stinging denunciation of its chief ally and diplomatic backer.

Beijing should be grateful to Pyongyang for its protection, said a bylined commentary carried by the Korean Central News Agency warning of “grave consequences” if China tests its patience further.

China’s Global Times newspaper retorted that the nuclear-armed North was in the grip of “some form of irrational logic” over its weapons programs.

Beijing and Pyongyang have a relationship forged in the blood of the Korean War, and the Asian giant remains its wayward neighbor’s main provider of aid and trade.

But ties have begun to fray in recent years, with China increasingly exasperated by the North’s nuclear antics and fearful of a regional crisis. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has yet to visit Beijing, more than five years after taking power.

The rival texts are a sign of the level to which ties between the two have deteriorated. KCNA regularly carries vivid denunciations of the US, Japan, and the South Korean authorities, but it is rare for it to turn its ire on China.

Beijing regularly calls for parties to avoid raising tensions — remarks that can apply to both Washington and Pyongyang — and in February it announced the suspension for the rest of the year of coal imports from the North, a crucial foreign currency earner for the authorities.

Chinese state-run media have called for harsher sanctions against the North in the event of a fresh atomic test, urged Pyongyang to “avoid making mistakes,” and spoken of the need for it to abandon its nuclear programs.

The KCNA commentary denounced the People’s Daily, the official mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party, and the Global Times, which sometimes reflects the thinking of the leadership, as having “raised lame excuses for the base acts of dancing to the tune of the US.”

Chinese suggestions that the North give up its weapons crossed a “red line” and were “ego-driven theory based on big-power chauvinism” said the article by Kim Chol, believed to be a pseudonym.

“The DPRK will never beg for the maintenance of friendship with China, risking its nuclear program, which is as precious as its own life,” it said, referring to the North by its official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Pyongyang had acted as a buffer between Beijing and Washington since the Korean War in the 1950s and “contributed to protecting peace and security of China,” it said, adding that its ally should “thank the DPRK for it.”

Beijing should not try to test the limits of the North’s patience, it said, warning: “China had better ponder over the grave consequences to be entailed by its reckless act of chopping down the pillar of the DPRK-China relations.”

‘Nationalistic passion’

In its response Thursday, the Global Times — which can sometimes stridently espouse what it sees as China’s interests — dismissed the KCNA article as “nothing more than a hyper-aggressive piece completely filled with nationalistic passion.”

“Pyongyang obviously is grappling with some form of irrational logic over its nuclear programme,” it added.

Beijing “should also make Pyongyang aware that it will react in unprecedented fashion if Pyongyang conducts another nuclear test,” it said.

“The more editorials KCNA publishes, the better Chinese society will be able to understand how Pyongyang thinks, and how hard it is to solve this nuclear issue,” the Global Times said.

Washington is meanwhile pushing Beijing — which says its influence is less than believed — to put more pressure on Pyongyang.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson last week warned the UN Security Council of “catastrophic consequences” if the international community — most notably China — failed to pressure the North into abandoning its weapons program.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi brushed aside Tillerson’s comments, saying that “the key to solving the nuclear issue on the peninsula does not lie in the hands of the Chinese side.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Thu May 04, 2017 11:49 am