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A.N.T.S. • Re: Why Only a Few States?

November 7, 2017 Permafrost 0

Illini Warrior wrote:Alaska doesn’t have food security – the little food they have stocked is just a week’s hedge for a couple of the cities – they are relying on FEMA to ride to the rescue just like all the other states – Alaska just realizes their c…

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General Canning Topics • Re: Vinegar

November 6, 2017 Permafrost 0

catfeet wrote:Use the cloudy bits to start a new "mother" for vinegar from fresh squeezed apple juice.If only we had a supply of apples here. I have tried many times to grow them but it has not happened.Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: Why Only a Few States?

November 6, 2017 Permafrost 0

Illini Warrior wrote:most states have their own preparation office – with some buddy of the governor in charge – a PR budget that cranks up the commercials when a disaster season comes around …. real authority to actually get the various state respo…

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General Canning Topics • Vinegar

November 5, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I am in town, and I figured I would catch up on some housekeeping issues since I’m here. I was going through our storage area and I found some expired jugs of vinegar. I am not the biggest believer in expiration dates, but these are like 10 years p…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: Why Only a Few States?

November 5, 2017 Permafrost 0

I am interested to know what states are actively preparing for a nuclear attack. I know Alaska has stockpiles of food in two locations, but they are not for Alaskans. I think it is food for 100,000 people for 30 days, but some may have been added afte…

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General Energy Discussion • Re: Off Grid? Really?

September 30, 2017 Permafrost 0
handyman777 wrote:
Are you ever really “off the grid” ? ? ?

You still have to pay tax’s.

Some places have no property taxes, and if your income is low enough you pay no federal income tax. So yes you can be free, but most will not like the lifestyle they must live to achieve it. I know a few folks who fit in this group, they might get $3000 to $5000 a year trapping and that is their only income. It is not a bad life, if you don’t mind burning rendered bear fat in lamps for your only light all winter long when it’s dark 20 or more hours a day.

I myself am “off grid” at my cabin that I am at about 1/3 to 1/2 the year. The other part of the year I am in town working & living with my family. The only things I have that are electric out there are a solar panel for a 12v freezer, and a 2000W generator for the food-saver & meat grinder. One of these days I want to put in some 12v LED lights, because it is really dark in the winter and I miss the light.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:50 am


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BOL’s and Retreats • Re: You Have Just Finished a Remote BOL…

September 30, 2017 Permafrost 0
Saxon Violence wrote:
Just for the sake of argument—lets suppose that you have a rather remote cabin built somewhere and that you can’t drive any closer than 10 to 20-Miles from your cabin. You’ve stocked your cabin with all of the standard stuff. Given the difficulty of transporting stuff to your cabin, you have to be a bit selective as to exactly what you carry in.

My cabin is over 200 river miles from the nearest road, over 100 miles by snowmachine in the winter. To say that it is difficult to transport things is a understatement. Not only is there weight and space restrictions, but you also have a large amount of breakage. If I need fragile things like globes for my oil lamps or glass jars I need to figure on hauling out double what I need because they will break in transit. Even plastic buckets filled with rice will shatter in the cold if I haul them out there during the winter on a freight sled behind a snowmachine.

When it comes down to it, you need it all to make it in the wilderness for any length of time. If you have it in town and use it to fix or build anything, you will need it or the non-power equivalent of it at your homestead. Add to this everything that is needed too keep it all working, like grease or oil or screws or nails or spare parts or a simple needle & thread. If you sub out dogs or horses for a petroleum powered motor (ATV or snowmachine) you need not only food for them but also meds if they get sick or hurt. Then there are the hidden items like blue board foam insulation that is used for outhouse seats in the winter so your skin does not freeze to the seat, the squirrels love to chew on the stuff so you can count on going through at least a sheet a year. Then you have bear damage, and you either need to be able to make your own lumber to do repairs or have a stockpile of store-bought stuff to fix what gets chewed or clawed on. Then you have personal medical needs, everything from pain meds to suture kits to tree loppers for frostbitten fingers & toes to splints & slings to all the regular meds a person might need for chronic conditions like blood pressure.

I don’t have some of the other stuff you mentioned. No posters or paintings. No books other than a few fiction books that I pick up for free wherever I can get them when I’m in town, when they get stale they are good toilet paper or fire starter. No curtains, it is dark all winter and I will take all the light I can get.

As a general rule, if it goes out there it does not come back. Get quality stuff, because repairs are a pain if you have to charter a plane to drop you parts. If you need a few bolts or a pound of nails, get 10 times what you need because going back to the store is not really a option and they will eventually get used up.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:32 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 13, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
so if someone has a flat and no spare – OK to ”borrow” a tire off your vehicle and leave you stranded ? … rummage thru someone’s garage for a tool you don’t happen to have … I’m guessing it’s all OK until it happens to U – that’s usually the way it is

Think it depends on your location and frame of mind. I don’t lock my cabin because someone may need something, just about everybody I know does the same as long as they are out of the major cities. Many villages I have lived in people will borrow tools without asking and then bring them back later. I have left my truck at trailheads and come back to find a note saying someone has grabbed one of the three spare tires I carry, they leave contact info and drop it off to me as soon as I am in town to contact them. It is a whole different mentality here. I’ve even seen a state trooper grab a loader off of a construction site to clear a landslide, because it was going to be days for a state crew to get out to do a hour of work.

Different mentality Illini. In a urban or suburban area a breakdown or road blockage is a inconvenience, in a rural area it can be life or death. Get trapped on a drifted in highway (granted ours are 2 lane gravel) at 50 below zero that only gets 4 or 5 vehicles on it in a week and it will kill people if it is not opened to get to those that are trapped in the middle. Even cops & judges understand this here and make allowances for the grater good, just like other everyday folks that own cabins or construction companies. We even have laws on the books that say it is illegal to pass hitchhikers if it is colder than 35 below zero, because if you do they will die. Like I said it’s a different mentality here.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:31 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 13, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
so if someone has a flat and no spare – OK to ”borrow” a tire off your vehicle and leave you stranded ? … rummage thru someone’s garage for a tool you don’t happen to have … I’m guessing it’s all OK until it happens to U – that’s usually the way it is

Think it depends on your location and frame of mind. I don’t lock my cabin because someone may need something, just about everybody I know does the same as long as they are out of the major cities. Many villages I have lived in people will borrow tools without asking and then bring them back later. I have left my truck at trailheads and come back to find a note saying someone has grabbed one of the three spare tires I carry, they leave contact info and drop it off to me as soon as I am in town to contact them. It is a whole different mentality here. I’ve even seen a state trooper grab a loader off of a construction site to clear a landslide, because it was going to be days for a state crew to get out to do a hour of work.

Different mentality Illini. In a urban or suburban area a breakdown or road blockage is a inconvenience, in a rural area it can be life or death. Get trapped on a drifted in highway (granted ours are 2 lane gravel) at 50 below zero that only gets 4 or 5 vehicles on it in a week and it will kill people if it is not opened to get to those that are trapped in the middle. Even cops & judges understand this here and make allowances for the grater good, just like other everyday folks that own cabins or construction companies. We even have laws on the books that say it is illegal to pass hitchhikers if it is colder than 35 below zero, because if you do they will die. Like I said it’s a different mentality here.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:31 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 10, 2017 Permafrost 0
PatrioticStabilist wrote:
But I sure wouldn’t be trying them out, might be hard to explain to a cop. LOL!

Nice thing about Alaska, there just isn’t that many cops. In the 300 mile stretch between North Anchorage (Wasilla) and Fairbanks I think there are like 3 or 4 state troopers for the whole road. That and it is not uncommon for people to “borrow” equipment from road construction sites on the side of the highway to clear accidents or move the moose that get hit, as long as the site is within 30 miles or so of where the equipment is needed. Although that always freaks out the tourists when you tell them you have to go 10 or 20 miles down the road to grab a loader to pull them out of the ditch, and then show up a hour later in a loader that has random company or state markings on it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:21 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 10, 2017 Permafrost 0
PatrioticStabilist wrote:
But I sure wouldn’t be trying them out, might be hard to explain to a cop. LOL!

Nice thing about Alaska, there just isn’t that many cops. In the 300 mile stretch between North Anchorage (Wasilla) and Fairbanks I think there are like 3 or 4 state troopers for the whole road. That and it is not uncommon for people to “borrow” equipment from road construction sites on the side of the highway to clear accidents or move the moose that get hit, as long as the site is within 30 miles or so of where the equipment is needed. Although that always freaks out the tourists when you tell them you have to go 10 or 20 miles down the road to grab a loader to pull them out of the ditch, and then show up a hour later in a loader that has random company or state markings on it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:21 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Heavy Equipment Escort

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was driving back to town today and I passed a construction site on the side of the highway. Lots of shiny stuff just sitting around. It got me thinking. I have a Caterpillar key on my keychain(among others like Honda and Yamaha outboard motor keys, Volvo, Case, IR, Hitachi, John Deere, and Polaris snowmachines), so I figured I would see if Cat has updated their locks in the last 10 years. They have not. It’s not like I stole it or anything, I just made sure my key still worked. Then I started thinking, does anyone else carry a key?

There are a lot of places a loader can get to that most other vehicles can not, including fording small rivers. The average “highway” speed is about 25 MPH on flat ground, and they will pull most hills around 20 MPH. I’ve gotten a zoom boom up to 35 MPH on the highway, but that is the exception because it is a telahandler instead of a true loader. The nice thing about heavy equipment is that it is so big nobody in their right mind is going to try to steal it under normal circumstances, so they all take the same key for each manufacturer. A Cat 299 skidsteer key will start up a 966 loader or a D8 bulldozer, same goes for Case and Volvo and Ingersoll Rand. The point I’m making with this is that if the roads are clogged with abandoned vehicles or storm damage has made travel impossible, all one needs to do is hit up your local construction site and fire something up to clear a path. Granted it is probably a little far fetched to envision bulldozing down a highway through gridlock in a mass exodus from a city with a convoy behind you. On the other hand I’ve “borrowed” equipment sitting at the boat landing to pull stuck vehicles out of the river or smooth out the launch ramp, I even leave a couple of bucks taped to the seat for the fuel I’ve used so nobody will complain or call the cops. If worse comes to worse, I make a point of knowing where the equipment in my area is so that I have more options if I need them.

For anyone who has not considered this, a few heavy equipment keys (along with other universal keys) will add some flexibility to your preps and your bug out plans.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:09 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Heavy Equipment Escort

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was driving back to town today and I passed a construction site on the side of the highway. Lots of shiny stuff just sitting around. It got me thinking. I have a Caterpillar key on my keychain(among others like Honda and Yamaha outboard motor keys, Volvo, Case, IR, Hitachi, John Deere, and Polaris snowmachines), so I figured I would see if Cat has updated their locks in the last 10 years. They have not. It’s not like I stole it or anything, I just made sure my key still worked. Then I started thinking, does anyone else carry a key?

There are a lot of places a loader can get to that most other vehicles can not, including fording small rivers. The average “highway” speed is about 25 MPH on flat ground, and they will pull most hills around 20 MPH. I’ve gotten a zoom boom up to 35 MPH on the highway, but that is the exception because it is a telahandler instead of a true loader. The nice thing about heavy equipment is that it is so big nobody in their right mind is going to try to steal it under normal circumstances, so they all take the same key for each manufacturer. A Cat 299 skidsteer key will start up a 966 loader or a D8 bulldozer, same goes for Case and Volvo and Ingersoll Rand. The point I’m making with this is that if the roads are clogged with abandoned vehicles or storm damage has made travel impossible, all one needs to do is hit up your local construction site and fire something up to clear a path. Granted it is probably a little far fetched to envision bulldozing down a highway through gridlock in a mass exodus from a city with a convoy behind you. On the other hand I’ve “borrowed” equipment sitting at the boat landing to pull stuck vehicles out of the river or smooth out the launch ramp, I even leave a couple of bucks taped to the seat for the fuel I’ve used so nobody will complain or call the cops. If worse comes to worse, I make a point of knowing where the equipment in my area is so that I have more options if I need them.

For anyone who has not considered this, a few heavy equipment keys (along with other universal keys) will add some flexibility to your preps and your bug out plans.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:09 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Where do you Draw the Line on Providing for the Family

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

A very interesting question, I would lump it in with cannibalism I think. I often wonder what I would do if I was flooded out or burned up by a forest fire post SHTF. The short answer is anything I have to. There are many survival tools of last resort that are less than savory options, but to not use them would bring shame and suffering to me and mine. A person can live with regrets, but first they must live through the situation.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:28 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Where do you Draw the Line on Providing for the Family

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

A very interesting question, I would lump it in with cannibalism I think. I often wonder what I would do if I was flooded out or burned up by a forest fire post SHTF. The short answer is anything I have to. There are many survival tools of last resort that are less than savory options, but to not use them would bring shame and suffering to me and mine. A person can live with regrets, but first they must live through the situation.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:28 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Re: North Korea threat?

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

Are you kidding, people are prepping like crazy here in the interior.

People are freezing or canning or dehydrating their garden harvests. Fish are drying for dog food or trapping bait. Folks are out hunting to fill the freezer. Look at any cart in the store and it is filled with canning & pickling salt or quart jars or food saver bags, or those folks who have a whole cart full of Mountain House freeze dried meals & MRE’s. Boats are leaving the landings filled to the brim with 55 gal drums of fuel and pallets of rice or dog food and spare parts for snowmachines or chainsaws and boxes of traps. Talk to anyone in line at Freddy’s or Safeway and they will tell you how busy they are stocking up and preparing.

But none of this has to do with North Korea, it is just the yearly prep for winter. Sure some americans might be feeding off the general prepping vibe and decide to stock up because they think it is about Korea, but the majority of it is a yearly phenomenon known across the artic as fall. Because we all know the truth, winter is coming, and soon. It will be dark & cold, and even for those on the road system there will be a few shortages due to weather and the trucks not getting through. For those in the villages or in remote cabins it will be even worse, no supplies or contact with the outside world until the rivers freeze solid enough to travel on. This is the last push, the last chance to stock up and prepare before everything freezes for the year. I’m sure there are a few out there that are worried about fat boy & his shiny new nukes, but I’m more worried about river ice and trail conditions and blizzards and cloud cover and where the mercury will eventually land.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:16 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Re: North Korea threat?

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

Are you kidding, people are prepping like crazy here in the interior.

People are freezing or canning or dehydrating their garden harvests. Fish are drying for dog food or trapping bait. Folks are out hunting to fill the freezer. Look at any cart in the store and it is filled with canning & pickling salt or quart jars or food saver bags, or those folks who have a whole cart full of Mountain House freeze dried meals & MRE’s. Boats are leaving the landings filled to the brim with 55 gal drums of fuel and pallets of rice or dog food and spare parts for snowmachines or chainsaws and boxes of traps. Talk to anyone in line at Freddy’s or Safeway and they will tell you how busy they are stocking up and preparing.

But none of this has to do with North Korea, it is just the yearly prep for winter. Sure some americans might be feeding off the general prepping vibe and decide to stock up because they think it is about Korea, but the majority of it is a yearly phenomenon known across the artic as fall. Because we all know the truth, winter is coming, and soon. It will be dark & cold, and even for those on the road system there will be a few shortages due to weather and the trucks not getting through. For those in the villages or in remote cabins it will be even worse, no supplies or contact with the outside world until the rivers freeze solid enough to travel on. This is the last push, the last chance to stock up and prepare before everything freezes for the year. I’m sure there are a few out there that are worried about fat boy & his shiny new nukes, but I’m more worried about river ice and trail conditions and blizzards and cloud cover and where the mercury will eventually land.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:16 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 28, 2017 Permafrost 0

I figured this would get more commenters, I know there are some on this site who are big proponents of groups.

I can see the loose cooperative approach, it is like living in a small village. Everybody goes about their business and for the most part is a stand alone entity, other than for things like security. Granted some of the villages here do have problems but it is a sound concept that has worked for centuries.

I was hoping to hear from someone from a group, as I think this is a different dynamic then the community/village style alliance. From the utopias in the Puget Sound in the late 1800’s to the communes in the 1960’s to the militia camps in the 1990’s, they all seemed to implode due to personality conflicts or politics within the group. I was hoping that with this gained knowledge modern prepper groups might have figured out a way to keep it together, and avoid the failures of the past. I would even be interested in hearing from someone with a struggling group, because they might have insight on how to avoid the pitfalls they are experiencing.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Fri Jul 28, 2017 12:08 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 28, 2017 Permafrost 0

I figured this would get more commenters, I know there are some on this site who are big proponents of groups.

I can see the loose cooperative approach, it is like living in a small village. Everybody goes about their business and for the most part is a stand alone entity, other than for things like security. Granted some of the villages here do have problems but it is a sound concept that has worked for centuries.

I was hoping to hear from someone from a group, as I think this is a different dynamic then the community/village style alliance. From the utopias in the Puget Sound in the late 1800’s to the communes in the 1960’s to the militia camps in the 1990’s, they all seemed to implode due to personality conflicts or politics within the group. I was hoping that with this gained knowledge modern prepper groups might have figured out a way to keep it together, and avoid the failures of the past. I would even be interested in hearing from someone with a struggling group, because they might have insight on how to avoid the pitfalls they are experiencing.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Fri Jul 28, 2017 12:08 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

To be honest I’ve never thought about it.

In town our dogs are contained and our house is not posted with anything.

Out at out cabin nothing is posted, it would be rude. We leave our cabin unlocked when we are gone incase someone needs to shelter there or is in a bad spot. We have a sign up telling people to clean up after themselves and our numbers so people can get ahold of us to replace whatever they use without going all the way back out there. To my knowledge our place has never been used but if someone cleaned up after themselves and didn’t steal anything noticeable (guns, ammo, tools) I am not sure I could tell. One of these days I might get a guest book to put there so I can see if anyone ever shows up when I’m gone, but nobody ever shows up when I’m there so the chances are slim. Our dogs roam free but people expect that in these parts, and most know how to approach a dog pack and remain unbitten until the owner (alpha) shows up. I am not sure dog signs would do any good anyway. We only technically own 15 acres but the dogs cover at least a few square miles around the cabin daily, and I claim a much larger area (about 600 to 1000 square miles) for personal use for trap lines. That would be a lot of signs to make.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

To be honest I’ve never thought about it.

In town our dogs are contained and our house is not posted with anything.

Out at out cabin nothing is posted, it would be rude. We leave our cabin unlocked when we are gone incase someone needs to shelter there or is in a bad spot. We have a sign up telling people to clean up after themselves and our numbers so people can get ahold of us to replace whatever they use without going all the way back out there. To my knowledge our place has never been used but if someone cleaned up after themselves and didn’t steal anything noticeable (guns, ammo, tools) I am not sure I could tell. One of these days I might get a guest book to put there so I can see if anyone ever shows up when I’m gone, but nobody ever shows up when I’m there so the chances are slim. Our dogs roam free but people expect that in these parts, and most know how to approach a dog pack and remain unbitten until the owner (alpha) shows up. I am not sure dog signs would do any good anyway. We only technically own 15 acres but the dogs cover at least a few square miles around the cabin daily, and I claim a much larger area (about 600 to 1000 square miles) for personal use for trap lines. That would be a lot of signs to make.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

To be honest I’ve never thought about it.

In town our dogs are contained and our house is not posted with anything.

Out at out cabin nothing is posted, it would be rude. We leave our cabin unlocked when we are gone incase someone needs to shelter there or is in a bad spot. We have a sign up telling people to clean up after themselves and our numbers so people can get ahold of us to replace whatever they use without going all the way back out there. To my knowledge our place has never been used but if someone cleaned up after themselves and didn’t steal anything noticeable (guns, ammo, tools) I am not sure I could tell. One of these days I might get a guest book to put there so I can see if anyone ever shows up when I’m gone, but nobody ever shows up when I’m there so the chances are slim. Our dogs roam free but people expect that in these parts, and most know how to approach a dog pack and remain unbitten until the owner (alpha) shows up. I am not sure dog signs would do any good anyway. We only technically own 15 acres but the dogs cover at least a few square miles around the cabin daily, and I claim a much larger area (about 600 to 1000 square miles) for personal use for trap lines. That would be a lot of signs to make.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0
daaswampman wrote:
Have you ever seen a million in gold? It would fit in a small shoe box with lots of room to spare and weigh about sixty pounds. Really not much of an issue to hide or move. Swamp

One of the mines I worked at had a million $ bar from the mill that they would show new hires after they got a tour of the pour room. It was sloped in a way that made it impossible to pick up with one hand, and they told everybody that if they could pick it up with one hand and walk away they could have it. Everybody’s fingers would slip on it, then one day a guy got it about a 1/2″ off the table before it slipped out of his grip. They stopped doing it after that.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:40 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0
daaswampman wrote:
Have you ever seen a million in gold? It would fit in a small shoe box with lots of room to spare and weigh about sixty pounds. Really not much of an issue to hide or move. Swamp

One of the mines I worked at had a million $ bar from the mill that they would show new hires after they got a tour of the pour room. It was sloped in a way that made it impossible to pick up with one hand, and they told everybody that if they could pick it up with one hand and walk away they could have it. Everybody’s fingers would slip on it, then one day a guy got it about a 1/2″ off the table before it slipped out of his grip. They stopped doing it after that.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:40 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0
daaswampman wrote:
Have you ever seen a million in gold? It would fit in a small shoe box with lots of room to spare and weigh about sixty pounds. Really not much of an issue to hide or move. Swamp

One of the mines I worked at had a million $ bar from the mill that they would show new hires after they got a tour of the pour room. It was sloped in a way that made it impossible to pick up with one hand, and they told everybody that if they could pick it up with one hand and walk away they could have it. Everybody’s fingers would slip on it, then one day a guy got it about a 1/2″ off the table before it slipped out of his grip. They stopped doing it after that.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:40 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Groups

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

So after a few back to back freight trips I think I’m in town for like 5 days or something and I thought it would be a good time to talk about groups. Anyone who has read my posts probably knows my views on groups, but I am trying to understand the other side of the equation. I’m not talking about the security aspects or the whole group collective labor thing, I want to know about the interpersonal aspects of it.

Personally I just don’t see it, so please explain it. I know I spent some time in a trap line cabin with my best friend and at the end of the season we decided that living in a 16×16 cabin for a winter was a bad idea, were still friends but now trap separately and don’t see each other that often. I know groups of miners who literally imploded during the season even though they were on good gold, because the personality conflicts got so bad. Alaska has had no shortage of divorces due to isolation in the wilderness, and these were people in love who just lost it because of the societal isolation and constant contact with the same person. These are “good times” situations where supplies are plentiful and though isolated in the wilderness society is just a plane ride away. What would happen during “stressful” situations where everything is falling apart and supplies are running short?

For those of you who have groups, what do you do to insure that personality conflicts don’t spiral out of control? Do you all undergo psychological screening? Have you spent months in isolation to try it out? Are you thinking that the alternatives will be so bad that everybody will just suck it up and deal with it? Do you do group counseling or something like that? What makes you think your group will weather the conflict without falling apart, because if you have a group I know you think it will survive otherwise you would not be part of it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:24 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Groups

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

So after a few back to back freight trips I think I’m in town for like 5 days or something and I thought it would be a good time to talk about groups. Anyone who has read my posts probably knows my views on groups, but I am trying to understand the other side of the equation. I’m not talking about the security aspects or the whole group collective labor thing, I want to know about the interpersonal aspects of it.

Personally I just don’t see it, so please explain it. I know I spent some time in a trap line cabin with my best friend and at the end of the season we decided that living in a 16×16 cabin for a winter was a bad idea, were still friends but now trap separately and don’t see each other that often. I know groups of miners who literally imploded during the season even though they were on good gold, because the personality conflicts got so bad. Alaska has had no shortage of divorces due to isolation in the wilderness, and these were people in love who just lost it because of the societal isolation and constant contact with the same person. These are “good times” situations where supplies are plentiful and though isolated in the wilderness society is just a plane ride away. What would happen during “stressful” situations where everything is falling apart and supplies are running short?

For those of you who have groups, what do you do to insure that personality conflicts don’t spiral out of control? Do you all undergo psychological screening? Have you spent months in isolation to try it out? Are you thinking that the alternatives will be so bad that everybody will just suck it up and deal with it? Do you do group counseling or something like that? What makes you think your group will weather the conflict without falling apart, because if you have a group I know you think it will survive otherwise you would not be part of it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:24 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Hunting-Then and Now

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

I can not stress how much I hate dogs for hunting, I love dogs but I have never had any luck using them for hunting. Up here we get about 5 or 6 months of the combined spring/summer/fall season, and during this time the dogs are mostly idle. I have tried so many times to use dogs for hunting but it has never worked. Granted none of my dogs have been hunting breeds (german shepherds, malamutes, huskies, and wolf hybrids) but I would think at some point they would eventually get it, but no. They may be great on a trap line and good for perimeter security but that is about it. As it is I have to really get on it if a bear shows up because they will either screw up my shot or drive it off, and it’s even worse in the fall with moose. I’ve thought about getting a black lab from the pound just to try a different breed but I think once it gets in the pack it will be like the rest of the dogs I have, only without a good winter coat or a desire to pull.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:51 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Hunting-Then and Now

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

I can not stress how much I hate dogs for hunting, I love dogs but I have never had any luck using them for hunting. Up here we get about 5 or 6 months of the combined spring/summer/fall season, and during this time the dogs are mostly idle. I have tried so many times to use dogs for hunting but it has never worked. Granted none of my dogs have been hunting breeds (german shepherds, malamutes, huskies, and wolf hybrids) but I would think at some point they would eventually get it, but no. They may be great on a trap line and good for perimeter security but that is about it. As it is I have to really get on it if a bear shows up because they will either screw up my shot or drive it off, and it’s even worse in the fall with moose. I’ve thought about getting a black lab from the pound just to try a different breed but I think once it gets in the pack it will be like the rest of the dogs I have, only without a good winter coat or a desire to pull.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:51 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Hunting-Then and Now

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

I can not stress how much I hate dogs for hunting, I love dogs but I have never had any luck using them for hunting. Up here we get about 5 or 6 months of the combined spring/summer/fall season, and during this time the dogs are mostly idle. I have tried so many times to use dogs for hunting but it has never worked. Granted none of my dogs have been hunting breeds (german shepherds, malamutes, huskies, and wolf hybrids) but I would think at some point they would eventually get it, but no. They may be great on a trap line and good for perimeter security but that is about it. As it is I have to really get on it if a bear shows up because they will either screw up my shot or drive it off, and it’s even worse in the fall with moose. I’ve thought about getting a black lab from the pound just to try a different breed but I think once it gets in the pack it will be like the rest of the dogs I have, only without a good winter coat or a desire to pull.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:51 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: How Many Blueprints Do I Need?

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

Bondie,
Get one digital copy and stick the printing costs on your contractor. A general contractor will probably have a printer that can print large stuff, and they are the ones that will decide which subs get blueprints. Depending on how the contract is written the contractor can also be the one who has to get all permits and file all paperwork with municipalities. If you are acting as your own GC then it is a whole different story.

I’d go for the basement, or at least a daylight basement. Two things though. One, insist on the whole basement (either poured concrete or block) being wrapped in a self sealing membrane to prevent ground water infiltration. Two, have the basement walls covered with either 2″ or 4″ of foam board insulation on the outside before they backfill. In northern climates many basements suffer from cracks because of the freeze/thaw cycle and the membrane will prevent water from seeping through them. I have also discovered that most spring ground water infiltration is because of the heat bulb effect. Simply put the ground around your basement thaws sooner because the basement puts heat out, and the snow on the ground that melts has to go somewhere. If all surrounding ground is frozen the only place for this water to go is right beside your basement walls. If you add some foam board the ground around your basement stays frozen and the water will follow the grade on top of the frozen soil. Also if you can swing it, do radiant heat flooring for either your slab or basement. They put pex in the floor and you pump a water/glycol mixture through it to provide heat, you’ll never have cold feet again.

P.S.
Consider yourself lucky you have a frost line, it only gets more expensive when you have no frost line or have soil that never thaws.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:26 am