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General Energy Discussion • Re: Off Grid? Really?

September 30, 2017 Permafrost 0
handyman777 wrote:
Are you ever really “off the grid” ? ? ?

You still have to pay tax’s.

Some places have no property taxes, and if your income is low enough you pay no federal income tax. So yes you can be free, but most will not like the lifestyle they must live to achieve it. I know a few folks who fit in this group, they might get $3000 to $5000 a year trapping and that is their only income. It is not a bad life, if you don’t mind burning rendered bear fat in lamps for your only light all winter long when it’s dark 20 or more hours a day.

I myself am “off grid” at my cabin that I am at about 1/3 to 1/2 the year. The other part of the year I am in town working & living with my family. The only things I have that are electric out there are a solar panel for a 12v freezer, and a 2000W generator for the food-saver & meat grinder. One of these days I want to put in some 12v LED lights, because it is really dark in the winter and I miss the light.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:50 am


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BOL’s and Retreats • Re: You Have Just Finished a Remote BOL…

September 30, 2017 Permafrost 0
Saxon Violence wrote:
Just for the sake of argument—lets suppose that you have a rather remote cabin built somewhere and that you can’t drive any closer than 10 to 20-Miles from your cabin. You’ve stocked your cabin with all of the standard stuff. Given the difficulty of transporting stuff to your cabin, you have to be a bit selective as to exactly what you carry in.

My cabin is over 200 river miles from the nearest road, over 100 miles by snowmachine in the winter. To say that it is difficult to transport things is a understatement. Not only is there weight and space restrictions, but you also have a large amount of breakage. If I need fragile things like globes for my oil lamps or glass jars I need to figure on hauling out double what I need because they will break in transit. Even plastic buckets filled with rice will shatter in the cold if I haul them out there during the winter on a freight sled behind a snowmachine.

When it comes down to it, you need it all to make it in the wilderness for any length of time. If you have it in town and use it to fix or build anything, you will need it or the non-power equivalent of it at your homestead. Add to this everything that is needed too keep it all working, like grease or oil or screws or nails or spare parts or a simple needle & thread. If you sub out dogs or horses for a petroleum powered motor (ATV or snowmachine) you need not only food for them but also meds if they get sick or hurt. Then there are the hidden items like blue board foam insulation that is used for outhouse seats in the winter so your skin does not freeze to the seat, the squirrels love to chew on the stuff so you can count on going through at least a sheet a year. Then you have bear damage, and you either need to be able to make your own lumber to do repairs or have a stockpile of store-bought stuff to fix what gets chewed or clawed on. Then you have personal medical needs, everything from pain meds to suture kits to tree loppers for frostbitten fingers & toes to splints & slings to all the regular meds a person might need for chronic conditions like blood pressure.

I don’t have some of the other stuff you mentioned. No posters or paintings. No books other than a few fiction books that I pick up for free wherever I can get them when I’m in town, when they get stale they are good toilet paper or fire starter. No curtains, it is dark all winter and I will take all the light I can get.

As a general rule, if it goes out there it does not come back. Get quality stuff, because repairs are a pain if you have to charter a plane to drop you parts. If you need a few bolts or a pound of nails, get 10 times what you need because going back to the store is not really a option and they will eventually get used up.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:32 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 13, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
so if someone has a flat and no spare – OK to ”borrow” a tire off your vehicle and leave you stranded ? … rummage thru someone’s garage for a tool you don’t happen to have … I’m guessing it’s all OK until it happens to U – that’s usually the way it is

Think it depends on your location and frame of mind. I don’t lock my cabin because someone may need something, just about everybody I know does the same as long as they are out of the major cities. Many villages I have lived in people will borrow tools without asking and then bring them back later. I have left my truck at trailheads and come back to find a note saying someone has grabbed one of the three spare tires I carry, they leave contact info and drop it off to me as soon as I am in town to contact them. It is a whole different mentality here. I’ve even seen a state trooper grab a loader off of a construction site to clear a landslide, because it was going to be days for a state crew to get out to do a hour of work.

Different mentality Illini. In a urban or suburban area a breakdown or road blockage is a inconvenience, in a rural area it can be life or death. Get trapped on a drifted in highway (granted ours are 2 lane gravel) at 50 below zero that only gets 4 or 5 vehicles on it in a week and it will kill people if it is not opened to get to those that are trapped in the middle. Even cops & judges understand this here and make allowances for the grater good, just like other everyday folks that own cabins or construction companies. We even have laws on the books that say it is illegal to pass hitchhikers if it is colder than 35 below zero, because if you do they will die. Like I said it’s a different mentality here.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:31 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 13, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
so if someone has a flat and no spare – OK to ”borrow” a tire off your vehicle and leave you stranded ? … rummage thru someone’s garage for a tool you don’t happen to have … I’m guessing it’s all OK until it happens to U – that’s usually the way it is

Think it depends on your location and frame of mind. I don’t lock my cabin because someone may need something, just about everybody I know does the same as long as they are out of the major cities. Many villages I have lived in people will borrow tools without asking and then bring them back later. I have left my truck at trailheads and come back to find a note saying someone has grabbed one of the three spare tires I carry, they leave contact info and drop it off to me as soon as I am in town to contact them. It is a whole different mentality here. I’ve even seen a state trooper grab a loader off of a construction site to clear a landslide, because it was going to be days for a state crew to get out to do a hour of work.

Different mentality Illini. In a urban or suburban area a breakdown or road blockage is a inconvenience, in a rural area it can be life or death. Get trapped on a drifted in highway (granted ours are 2 lane gravel) at 50 below zero that only gets 4 or 5 vehicles on it in a week and it will kill people if it is not opened to get to those that are trapped in the middle. Even cops & judges understand this here and make allowances for the grater good, just like other everyday folks that own cabins or construction companies. We even have laws on the books that say it is illegal to pass hitchhikers if it is colder than 35 below zero, because if you do they will die. Like I said it’s a different mentality here.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:31 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 10, 2017 Permafrost 0
PatrioticStabilist wrote:
But I sure wouldn’t be trying them out, might be hard to explain to a cop. LOL!

Nice thing about Alaska, there just isn’t that many cops. In the 300 mile stretch between North Anchorage (Wasilla) and Fairbanks I think there are like 3 or 4 state troopers for the whole road. That and it is not uncommon for people to “borrow” equipment from road construction sites on the side of the highway to clear accidents or move the moose that get hit, as long as the site is within 30 miles or so of where the equipment is needed. Although that always freaks out the tourists when you tell them you have to go 10 or 20 miles down the road to grab a loader to pull them out of the ditch, and then show up a hour later in a loader that has random company or state markings on it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:21 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 10, 2017 Permafrost 0
PatrioticStabilist wrote:
But I sure wouldn’t be trying them out, might be hard to explain to a cop. LOL!

Nice thing about Alaska, there just isn’t that many cops. In the 300 mile stretch between North Anchorage (Wasilla) and Fairbanks I think there are like 3 or 4 state troopers for the whole road. That and it is not uncommon for people to “borrow” equipment from road construction sites on the side of the highway to clear accidents or move the moose that get hit, as long as the site is within 30 miles or so of where the equipment is needed. Although that always freaks out the tourists when you tell them you have to go 10 or 20 miles down the road to grab a loader to pull them out of the ditch, and then show up a hour later in a loader that has random company or state markings on it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:21 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Heavy Equipment Escort

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was driving back to town today and I passed a construction site on the side of the highway. Lots of shiny stuff just sitting around. It got me thinking. I have a Caterpillar key on my keychain(among others like Honda and Yamaha outboard motor keys, Volvo, Case, IR, Hitachi, John Deere, and Polaris snowmachines), so I figured I would see if Cat has updated their locks in the last 10 years. They have not. It’s not like I stole it or anything, I just made sure my key still worked. Then I started thinking, does anyone else carry a key?

There are a lot of places a loader can get to that most other vehicles can not, including fording small rivers. The average “highway” speed is about 25 MPH on flat ground, and they will pull most hills around 20 MPH. I’ve gotten a zoom boom up to 35 MPH on the highway, but that is the exception because it is a telahandler instead of a true loader. The nice thing about heavy equipment is that it is so big nobody in their right mind is going to try to steal it under normal circumstances, so they all take the same key for each manufacturer. A Cat 299 skidsteer key will start up a 966 loader or a D8 bulldozer, same goes for Case and Volvo and Ingersoll Rand. The point I’m making with this is that if the roads are clogged with abandoned vehicles or storm damage has made travel impossible, all one needs to do is hit up your local construction site and fire something up to clear a path. Granted it is probably a little far fetched to envision bulldozing down a highway through gridlock in a mass exodus from a city with a convoy behind you. On the other hand I’ve “borrowed” equipment sitting at the boat landing to pull stuck vehicles out of the river or smooth out the launch ramp, I even leave a couple of bucks taped to the seat for the fuel I’ve used so nobody will complain or call the cops. If worse comes to worse, I make a point of knowing where the equipment in my area is so that I have more options if I need them.

For anyone who has not considered this, a few heavy equipment keys (along with other universal keys) will add some flexibility to your preps and your bug out plans.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:09 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Heavy Equipment Escort

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was driving back to town today and I passed a construction site on the side of the highway. Lots of shiny stuff just sitting around. It got me thinking. I have a Caterpillar key on my keychain(among others like Honda and Yamaha outboard motor keys, Volvo, Case, IR, Hitachi, John Deere, and Polaris snowmachines), so I figured I would see if Cat has updated their locks in the last 10 years. They have not. It’s not like I stole it or anything, I just made sure my key still worked. Then I started thinking, does anyone else carry a key?

There are a lot of places a loader can get to that most other vehicles can not, including fording small rivers. The average “highway” speed is about 25 MPH on flat ground, and they will pull most hills around 20 MPH. I’ve gotten a zoom boom up to 35 MPH on the highway, but that is the exception because it is a telahandler instead of a true loader. The nice thing about heavy equipment is that it is so big nobody in their right mind is going to try to steal it under normal circumstances, so they all take the same key for each manufacturer. A Cat 299 skidsteer key will start up a 966 loader or a D8 bulldozer, same goes for Case and Volvo and Ingersoll Rand. The point I’m making with this is that if the roads are clogged with abandoned vehicles or storm damage has made travel impossible, all one needs to do is hit up your local construction site and fire something up to clear a path. Granted it is probably a little far fetched to envision bulldozing down a highway through gridlock in a mass exodus from a city with a convoy behind you. On the other hand I’ve “borrowed” equipment sitting at the boat landing to pull stuck vehicles out of the river or smooth out the launch ramp, I even leave a couple of bucks taped to the seat for the fuel I’ve used so nobody will complain or call the cops. If worse comes to worse, I make a point of knowing where the equipment in my area is so that I have more options if I need them.

For anyone who has not considered this, a few heavy equipment keys (along with other universal keys) will add some flexibility to your preps and your bug out plans.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:09 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Where do you Draw the Line on Providing for the Family

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

A very interesting question, I would lump it in with cannibalism I think. I often wonder what I would do if I was flooded out or burned up by a forest fire post SHTF. The short answer is anything I have to. There are many survival tools of last resort that are less than savory options, but to not use them would bring shame and suffering to me and mine. A person can live with regrets, but first they must live through the situation.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:28 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Where do you Draw the Line on Providing for the Family

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

A very interesting question, I would lump it in with cannibalism I think. I often wonder what I would do if I was flooded out or burned up by a forest fire post SHTF. The short answer is anything I have to. There are many survival tools of last resort that are less than savory options, but to not use them would bring shame and suffering to me and mine. A person can live with regrets, but first they must live through the situation.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:28 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Re: North Korea threat?

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

Are you kidding, people are prepping like crazy here in the interior.

People are freezing or canning or dehydrating their garden harvests. Fish are drying for dog food or trapping bait. Folks are out hunting to fill the freezer. Look at any cart in the store and it is filled with canning & pickling salt or quart jars or food saver bags, or those folks who have a whole cart full of Mountain House freeze dried meals & MRE’s. Boats are leaving the landings filled to the brim with 55 gal drums of fuel and pallets of rice or dog food and spare parts for snowmachines or chainsaws and boxes of traps. Talk to anyone in line at Freddy’s or Safeway and they will tell you how busy they are stocking up and preparing.

But none of this has to do with North Korea, it is just the yearly prep for winter. Sure some americans might be feeding off the general prepping vibe and decide to stock up because they think it is about Korea, but the majority of it is a yearly phenomenon known across the artic as fall. Because we all know the truth, winter is coming, and soon. It will be dark & cold, and even for those on the road system there will be a few shortages due to weather and the trucks not getting through. For those in the villages or in remote cabins it will be even worse, no supplies or contact with the outside world until the rivers freeze solid enough to travel on. This is the last push, the last chance to stock up and prepare before everything freezes for the year. I’m sure there are a few out there that are worried about fat boy & his shiny new nukes, but I’m more worried about river ice and trail conditions and blizzards and cloud cover and where the mercury will eventually land.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:16 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Re: North Korea threat?

September 9, 2017 Permafrost 0

Are you kidding, people are prepping like crazy here in the interior.

People are freezing or canning or dehydrating their garden harvests. Fish are drying for dog food or trapping bait. Folks are out hunting to fill the freezer. Look at any cart in the store and it is filled with canning & pickling salt or quart jars or food saver bags, or those folks who have a whole cart full of Mountain House freeze dried meals & MRE’s. Boats are leaving the landings filled to the brim with 55 gal drums of fuel and pallets of rice or dog food and spare parts for snowmachines or chainsaws and boxes of traps. Talk to anyone in line at Freddy’s or Safeway and they will tell you how busy they are stocking up and preparing.

But none of this has to do with North Korea, it is just the yearly prep for winter. Sure some americans might be feeding off the general prepping vibe and decide to stock up because they think it is about Korea, but the majority of it is a yearly phenomenon known across the artic as fall. Because we all know the truth, winter is coming, and soon. It will be dark & cold, and even for those on the road system there will be a few shortages due to weather and the trucks not getting through. For those in the villages or in remote cabins it will be even worse, no supplies or contact with the outside world until the rivers freeze solid enough to travel on. This is the last push, the last chance to stock up and prepare before everything freezes for the year. I’m sure there are a few out there that are worried about fat boy & his shiny new nukes, but I’m more worried about river ice and trail conditions and blizzards and cloud cover and where the mercury will eventually land.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:16 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 28, 2017 Permafrost 0

I figured this would get more commenters, I know there are some on this site who are big proponents of groups.

I can see the loose cooperative approach, it is like living in a small village. Everybody goes about their business and for the most part is a stand alone entity, other than for things like security. Granted some of the villages here do have problems but it is a sound concept that has worked for centuries.

I was hoping to hear from someone from a group, as I think this is a different dynamic then the community/village style alliance. From the utopias in the Puget Sound in the late 1800’s to the communes in the 1960’s to the militia camps in the 1990’s, they all seemed to implode due to personality conflicts or politics within the group. I was hoping that with this gained knowledge modern prepper groups might have figured out a way to keep it together, and avoid the failures of the past. I would even be interested in hearing from someone with a struggling group, because they might have insight on how to avoid the pitfalls they are experiencing.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Fri Jul 28, 2017 12:08 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 28, 2017 Permafrost 0

I figured this would get more commenters, I know there are some on this site who are big proponents of groups.

I can see the loose cooperative approach, it is like living in a small village. Everybody goes about their business and for the most part is a stand alone entity, other than for things like security. Granted some of the villages here do have problems but it is a sound concept that has worked for centuries.

I was hoping to hear from someone from a group, as I think this is a different dynamic then the community/village style alliance. From the utopias in the Puget Sound in the late 1800’s to the communes in the 1960’s to the militia camps in the 1990’s, they all seemed to implode due to personality conflicts or politics within the group. I was hoping that with this gained knowledge modern prepper groups might have figured out a way to keep it together, and avoid the failures of the past. I would even be interested in hearing from someone with a struggling group, because they might have insight on how to avoid the pitfalls they are experiencing.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Fri Jul 28, 2017 12:08 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

To be honest I’ve never thought about it.

In town our dogs are contained and our house is not posted with anything.

Out at out cabin nothing is posted, it would be rude. We leave our cabin unlocked when we are gone incase someone needs to shelter there or is in a bad spot. We have a sign up telling people to clean up after themselves and our numbers so people can get ahold of us to replace whatever they use without going all the way back out there. To my knowledge our place has never been used but if someone cleaned up after themselves and didn’t steal anything noticeable (guns, ammo, tools) I am not sure I could tell. One of these days I might get a guest book to put there so I can see if anyone ever shows up when I’m gone, but nobody ever shows up when I’m there so the chances are slim. Our dogs roam free but people expect that in these parts, and most know how to approach a dog pack and remain unbitten until the owner (alpha) shows up. I am not sure dog signs would do any good anyway. We only technically own 15 acres but the dogs cover at least a few square miles around the cabin daily, and I claim a much larger area (about 600 to 1000 square miles) for personal use for trap lines. That would be a lot of signs to make.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

To be honest I’ve never thought about it.

In town our dogs are contained and our house is not posted with anything.

Out at out cabin nothing is posted, it would be rude. We leave our cabin unlocked when we are gone incase someone needs to shelter there or is in a bad spot. We have a sign up telling people to clean up after themselves and our numbers so people can get ahold of us to replace whatever they use without going all the way back out there. To my knowledge our place has never been used but if someone cleaned up after themselves and didn’t steal anything noticeable (guns, ammo, tools) I am not sure I could tell. One of these days I might get a guest book to put there so I can see if anyone ever shows up when I’m gone, but nobody ever shows up when I’m there so the chances are slim. Our dogs roam free but people expect that in these parts, and most know how to approach a dog pack and remain unbitten until the owner (alpha) shows up. I am not sure dog signs would do any good anyway. We only technically own 15 acres but the dogs cover at least a few square miles around the cabin daily, and I claim a much larger area (about 600 to 1000 square miles) for personal use for trap lines. That would be a lot of signs to make.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: My Home, My Property

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

To be honest I’ve never thought about it.

In town our dogs are contained and our house is not posted with anything.

Out at out cabin nothing is posted, it would be rude. We leave our cabin unlocked when we are gone incase someone needs to shelter there or is in a bad spot. We have a sign up telling people to clean up after themselves and our numbers so people can get ahold of us to replace whatever they use without going all the way back out there. To my knowledge our place has never been used but if someone cleaned up after themselves and didn’t steal anything noticeable (guns, ammo, tools) I am not sure I could tell. One of these days I might get a guest book to put there so I can see if anyone ever shows up when I’m gone, but nobody ever shows up when I’m there so the chances are slim. Our dogs roam free but people expect that in these parts, and most know how to approach a dog pack and remain unbitten until the owner (alpha) shows up. I am not sure dog signs would do any good anyway. We only technically own 15 acres but the dogs cover at least a few square miles around the cabin daily, and I claim a much larger area (about 600 to 1000 square miles) for personal use for trap lines. That would be a lot of signs to make.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0
daaswampman wrote:
Have you ever seen a million in gold? It would fit in a small shoe box with lots of room to spare and weigh about sixty pounds. Really not much of an issue to hide or move. Swamp

One of the mines I worked at had a million $ bar from the mill that they would show new hires after they got a tour of the pour room. It was sloped in a way that made it impossible to pick up with one hand, and they told everybody that if they could pick it up with one hand and walk away they could have it. Everybody’s fingers would slip on it, then one day a guy got it about a 1/2″ off the table before it slipped out of his grip. They stopped doing it after that.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:40 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0
daaswampman wrote:
Have you ever seen a million in gold? It would fit in a small shoe box with lots of room to spare and weigh about sixty pounds. Really not much of an issue to hide or move. Swamp

One of the mines I worked at had a million $ bar from the mill that they would show new hires after they got a tour of the pour room. It was sloped in a way that made it impossible to pick up with one hand, and they told everybody that if they could pick it up with one hand and walk away they could have it. Everybody’s fingers would slip on it, then one day a guy got it about a 1/2″ off the table before it slipped out of his grip. They stopped doing it after that.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:40 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0
daaswampman wrote:
Have you ever seen a million in gold? It would fit in a small shoe box with lots of room to spare and weigh about sixty pounds. Really not much of an issue to hide or move. Swamp

One of the mines I worked at had a million $ bar from the mill that they would show new hires after they got a tour of the pour room. It was sloped in a way that made it impossible to pick up with one hand, and they told everybody that if they could pick it up with one hand and walk away they could have it. Everybody’s fingers would slip on it, then one day a guy got it about a 1/2″ off the table before it slipped out of his grip. They stopped doing it after that.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:40 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Groups

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

So after a few back to back freight trips I think I’m in town for like 5 days or something and I thought it would be a good time to talk about groups. Anyone who has read my posts probably knows my views on groups, but I am trying to understand the other side of the equation. I’m not talking about the security aspects or the whole group collective labor thing, I want to know about the interpersonal aspects of it.

Personally I just don’t see it, so please explain it. I know I spent some time in a trap line cabin with my best friend and at the end of the season we decided that living in a 16×16 cabin for a winter was a bad idea, were still friends but now trap separately and don’t see each other that often. I know groups of miners who literally imploded during the season even though they were on good gold, because the personality conflicts got so bad. Alaska has had no shortage of divorces due to isolation in the wilderness, and these were people in love who just lost it because of the societal isolation and constant contact with the same person. These are “good times” situations where supplies are plentiful and though isolated in the wilderness society is just a plane ride away. What would happen during “stressful” situations where everything is falling apart and supplies are running short?

For those of you who have groups, what do you do to insure that personality conflicts don’t spiral out of control? Do you all undergo psychological screening? Have you spent months in isolation to try it out? Are you thinking that the alternatives will be so bad that everybody will just suck it up and deal with it? Do you do group counseling or something like that? What makes you think your group will weather the conflict without falling apart, because if you have a group I know you think it will survive otherwise you would not be part of it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:24 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Groups

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

So after a few back to back freight trips I think I’m in town for like 5 days or something and I thought it would be a good time to talk about groups. Anyone who has read my posts probably knows my views on groups, but I am trying to understand the other side of the equation. I’m not talking about the security aspects or the whole group collective labor thing, I want to know about the interpersonal aspects of it.

Personally I just don’t see it, so please explain it. I know I spent some time in a trap line cabin with my best friend and at the end of the season we decided that living in a 16×16 cabin for a winter was a bad idea, were still friends but now trap separately and don’t see each other that often. I know groups of miners who literally imploded during the season even though they were on good gold, because the personality conflicts got so bad. Alaska has had no shortage of divorces due to isolation in the wilderness, and these were people in love who just lost it because of the societal isolation and constant contact with the same person. These are “good times” situations where supplies are plentiful and though isolated in the wilderness society is just a plane ride away. What would happen during “stressful” situations where everything is falling apart and supplies are running short?

For those of you who have groups, what do you do to insure that personality conflicts don’t spiral out of control? Do you all undergo psychological screening? Have you spent months in isolation to try it out? Are you thinking that the alternatives will be so bad that everybody will just suck it up and deal with it? Do you do group counseling or something like that? What makes you think your group will weather the conflict without falling apart, because if you have a group I know you think it will survive otherwise you would not be part of it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:24 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Hunting-Then and Now

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

I can not stress how much I hate dogs for hunting, I love dogs but I have never had any luck using them for hunting. Up here we get about 5 or 6 months of the combined spring/summer/fall season, and during this time the dogs are mostly idle. I have tried so many times to use dogs for hunting but it has never worked. Granted none of my dogs have been hunting breeds (german shepherds, malamutes, huskies, and wolf hybrids) but I would think at some point they would eventually get it, but no. They may be great on a trap line and good for perimeter security but that is about it. As it is I have to really get on it if a bear shows up because they will either screw up my shot or drive it off, and it’s even worse in the fall with moose. I’ve thought about getting a black lab from the pound just to try a different breed but I think once it gets in the pack it will be like the rest of the dogs I have, only without a good winter coat or a desire to pull.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:51 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Hunting-Then and Now

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

I can not stress how much I hate dogs for hunting, I love dogs but I have never had any luck using them for hunting. Up here we get about 5 or 6 months of the combined spring/summer/fall season, and during this time the dogs are mostly idle. I have tried so many times to use dogs for hunting but it has never worked. Granted none of my dogs have been hunting breeds (german shepherds, malamutes, huskies, and wolf hybrids) but I would think at some point they would eventually get it, but no. They may be great on a trap line and good for perimeter security but that is about it. As it is I have to really get on it if a bear shows up because they will either screw up my shot or drive it off, and it’s even worse in the fall with moose. I’ve thought about getting a black lab from the pound just to try a different breed but I think once it gets in the pack it will be like the rest of the dogs I have, only without a good winter coat or a desire to pull.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:51 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Hunting-Then and Now

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

I can not stress how much I hate dogs for hunting, I love dogs but I have never had any luck using them for hunting. Up here we get about 5 or 6 months of the combined spring/summer/fall season, and during this time the dogs are mostly idle. I have tried so many times to use dogs for hunting but it has never worked. Granted none of my dogs have been hunting breeds (german shepherds, malamutes, huskies, and wolf hybrids) but I would think at some point they would eventually get it, but no. They may be great on a trap line and good for perimeter security but that is about it. As it is I have to really get on it if a bear shows up because they will either screw up my shot or drive it off, and it’s even worse in the fall with moose. I’ve thought about getting a black lab from the pound just to try a different breed but I think once it gets in the pack it will be like the rest of the dogs I have, only without a good winter coat or a desire to pull.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:51 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: How Many Blueprints Do I Need?

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

Bondie,
Get one digital copy and stick the printing costs on your contractor. A general contractor will probably have a printer that can print large stuff, and they are the ones that will decide which subs get blueprints. Depending on how the contract is written the contractor can also be the one who has to get all permits and file all paperwork with municipalities. If you are acting as your own GC then it is a whole different story.

I’d go for the basement, or at least a daylight basement. Two things though. One, insist on the whole basement (either poured concrete or block) being wrapped in a self sealing membrane to prevent ground water infiltration. Two, have the basement walls covered with either 2″ or 4″ of foam board insulation on the outside before they backfill. In northern climates many basements suffer from cracks because of the freeze/thaw cycle and the membrane will prevent water from seeping through them. I have also discovered that most spring ground water infiltration is because of the heat bulb effect. Simply put the ground around your basement thaws sooner because the basement puts heat out, and the snow on the ground that melts has to go somewhere. If all surrounding ground is frozen the only place for this water to go is right beside your basement walls. If you add some foam board the ground around your basement stays frozen and the water will follow the grade on top of the frozen soil. Also if you can swing it, do radiant heat flooring for either your slab or basement. They put pex in the floor and you pump a water/glycol mixture through it to provide heat, you’ll never have cold feet again.

P.S.
Consider yourself lucky you have a frost line, it only gets more expensive when you have no frost line or have soil that never thaws.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:26 am


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Construction Cornerstone • Re: How Many Blueprints Do I Need?

July 27, 2017 Permafrost 0

Bondie,
Get one digital copy and stick the printing costs on your contractor. A general contractor will probably have a printer that can print large stuff, and they are the ones that will decide which subs get blueprints. Depending on how the contract is written the contractor can also be the one who has to get all permits and file all paperwork with municipalities. If you are acting as your own GC then it is a whole different story.

I’d go for the basement, or at least a daylight basement. Two things though. One, insist on the whole basement (either poured concrete or block) being wrapped in a self sealing membrane to prevent ground water infiltration. Two, have the basement walls covered with either 2″ or 4″ of foam board insulation on the outside before they backfill. In northern climates many basements suffer from cracks because of the freeze/thaw cycle and the membrane will prevent water from seeping through them. I have also discovered that most spring ground water infiltration is because of the heat bulb effect. Simply put the ground around your basement thaws sooner because the basement puts heat out, and the snow on the ground that melts has to go somewhere. If all surrounding ground is frozen the only place for this water to go is right beside your basement walls. If you add some foam board the ground around your basement stays frozen and the water will follow the grade on top of the frozen soil. Also if you can swing it, do radiant heat flooring for either your slab or basement. They put pex in the floor and you pump a water/glycol mixture through it to provide heat, you’ll never have cold feet again.

P.S.
Consider yourself lucky you have a frost line, it only gets more expensive when you have no frost line or have soil that never thaws.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:26 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Ground Thawing

July 17, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was at the landing the other day coming back to town and I got to talking to this guy who had just put in a well through permafrost. I thought it was a neat idea so I figured I would share it for anyone in Alaska having similar issues. I think next year I might try it, and I will use the technique to try to thaw a new outhouse hole.

He had a simple set-up for thawing through permafrost to put in a shallow sandpoint well. He had a water pump and hose connected to a pipe assembly. The pipe assembly was a 3″ abs pipe & reducer with a 1″ pvc pipe inside it the same length as the 3″ pipe. Water from the river (through pump) would go down the 1″ pipe an thaw the ground and come out around the 3″ pipe. Because the river water was above freezing it would melt the permafrost and the whole pipe assembly could slowly be pushed into the ground. Every 5′ he had to shut down the operation and cut the top off of the 3″ pipe to add another section with a coupler, while the top was off he would yard out the 1″ pipe and add another section to the bottom of it. He would then slide the 1″ pipe back down the 3″ hole and reattach the cap, starting the whole process over again. He said he went down 20′ and then hit gravel and the pipe assembly would not move, but gravel is a non-frost susceptible material so he was then able to cut the cap off and pull the 1″ out. He then assembled 25′ of galvanized 2″ pipe and a sandpoint and lowered it down the 3″ hole, and proceeded to drive the well the last 5 feet with a sledge hammer. He backfilled between the 3″abs and the 2″ galvy with course sand to prevent frost jacking of his well pipe or silt infiltration. He said because the water is directed down and in a concentrated area he got very little melting of the surrounding permafrost, and the morning after he was all finished the 3″ had completely frozen in and the frost line was 1′ down even right next to the abs. He couldn’t tell where the frost line was on the course sand between the casings but he thought all would be fine because any residual water would have drained through before it all refroze again.

I thought this was a very simplistic idea for dealing with a backbreaking problem. I think I’m going to try it with 12″ pipe and use it for the perimeter of my new outhouse next year. Currently my outhouses are only about 3′ deep because once the bottom thaws enough to dig more the sides collapse or the bottom becomes flooded with water from the melting permafrost. I’m thinking of doing a bunch of holes in line and then breaking them through so I can lower in log cribbing and then just worry about digging out the middle once the sides are stable. Hopefully by next summer I’ll have a new outhouse that is like 6′ or 8′ deep & if I can afford the well casing I might also try the well, I get tired of waiting for the silt to settle out of my drinking water.

Hope this helps anyone up here who is dealing with similar problems.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:19 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Ground Thawing

July 17, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was at the landing the other day coming back to town and I got to talking to this guy who had just put in a well through permafrost. I thought it was a neat idea so I figured I would share it for anyone in Alaska having similar issues. I think next year I might try it, and I will use the technique to try to thaw a new outhouse hole.

He had a simple set-up for thawing through permafrost to put in a shallow sandpoint well. He had a water pump and hose connected to a pipe assembly. The pipe assembly was a 3″ abs pipe & reducer with a 1″ pvc pipe inside it the same length as the 3″ pipe. Water from the river (through pump) would go down the 1″ pipe an thaw the ground and come out around the 3″ pipe. Because the river water was above freezing it would melt the permafrost and the whole pipe assembly could slowly be pushed into the ground. Every 5′ he had to shut down the operation and cut the top off of the 3″ pipe to add another section with a coupler, while the top was off he would yard out the 1″ pipe and add another section to the bottom of it. He would then slide the 1″ pipe back down the 3″ hole and reattach the cap, starting the whole process over again. He said he went down 20′ and then hit gravel and the pipe assembly would not move, but gravel is a non-frost susceptible material so he was then able to cut the cap off and pull the 1″ out. He then assembled 25′ of galvanized 2″ pipe and a sandpoint and lowered it down the 3″ hole, and proceeded to drive the well the last 5 feet with a sledge hammer. He backfilled between the 3″abs and the 2″ galvy with course sand to prevent frost jacking of his well pipe or silt infiltration. He said because the water is directed down and in a concentrated area he got very little melting of the surrounding permafrost, and the morning after he was all finished the 3″ had completely frozen in and the frost line was 1′ down even right next to the abs. He couldn’t tell where the frost line was on the course sand between the casings but he thought all would be fine because any residual water would have drained through before it all refroze again.

I thought this was a very simplistic idea for dealing with a backbreaking problem. I think I’m going to try it with 12″ pipe and use it for the perimeter of my new outhouse next year. Currently my outhouses are only about 3′ deep because once the bottom thaws enough to dig more the sides collapse or the bottom becomes flooded with water from the melting permafrost. I’m thinking of doing a bunch of holes in line and then breaking them through so I can lower in log cribbing and then just worry about digging out the middle once the sides are stable. Hopefully by next summer I’ll have a new outhouse that is like 6′ or 8′ deep & if I can afford the well casing I might also try the well, I get tired of waiting for the silt to settle out of my drinking water.

Hope this helps anyone up here who is dealing with similar problems.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:19 am


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Alaska Discussion, News, and Weather • Ground Thawing

July 17, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was at the landing the other day coming back to town and I got to talking to this guy who had just put in a well through permafrost. I thought it was a neat idea so I figured I would share it for anyone in Alaska having similar issues. I think next year I might try it, and I will use the technique to try to thaw a new outhouse hole.

He had a simple set-up for thawing through permafrost to put in a shallow sandpoint well. He had a water pump and hose connected to a pipe assembly. The pipe assembly was a 3″ abs pipe & reducer with a 1″ pvc pipe inside it the same length as the 3″ pipe. Water from the river (through pump) would go down the 1″ pipe an thaw the ground and come out around the 3″ pipe. Because the river water was above freezing it would melt the permafrost and the whole pipe assembly could slowly be pushed into the ground. Every 5′ he had to shut down the operation and cut the top off of the 3″ pipe to add another section with a coupler, while the top was off he would yard out the 1″ pipe and add another section to the bottom of it. He would then slide the 1″ pipe back down the 3″ hole and reattach the cap, starting the whole process over again. He said he went down 20′ and then hit gravel and the pipe assembly would not move, but gravel is a non-frost susceptible material so he was then able to cut the cap off and pull the 1″ out. He then assembled 25′ of galvanized 2″ pipe and a sandpoint and lowered it down the 3″ hole, and proceeded to drive the well the last 5 feet with a sledge hammer. He backfilled between the 3″abs and the 2″ galvy with course sand to prevent frost jacking of his well pipe or silt infiltration. He said because the water is directed down and in a concentrated area he got very little melting of the surrounding permafrost, and the morning after he was all finished the 3″ had completely frozen in and the frost line was 1′ down even right next to the abs. He couldn’t tell where the frost line was on the course sand between the casings but he thought all would be fine because any residual water would have drained through before it all refroze again.

I thought this was a very simplistic idea for dealing with a backbreaking problem. I think I’m going to try it with 12″ pipe and use it for the perimeter of my new outhouse next year. Currently my outhouses are only about 3′ deep because once the bottom thaws enough to dig more the sides collapse or the bottom becomes flooded with water from the melting permafrost. I’m thinking of doing a bunch of holes in line and then breaking them through so I can lower in log cribbing and then just worry about digging out the middle once the sides are stable. Hopefully by next summer I’ll have a new outhouse that is like 6′ or 8′ deep & if I can afford the well casing I might also try the well, I get tired of waiting for the silt to settle out of my drinking water.

Hope this helps anyone up here who is dealing with similar problems.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:19 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Are we becoming to soft for the outside world?

July 17, 2017 Permafrost 0

First of all I would like to thank founderant, I’ve seen some of this guys gear reviews and I was not impressed from a artic survival standpoint. I may give him another chance on other topics, although he seems very urban. He must be from the southern part of Canada, definitely not a Northwest Territories or Yukon Territory or Nunavut kind of guy.

I agree with his assessment of people. I also agree with his division between preppers and survivalists, although this was a new line of thinking for me.

I think I notice this phenomenon most in the winter here. Those that live & work in the cities are only outside long enough to get to or from their car, or they wait until it warms up to go out on snowmachine for recreation. Those subsistence users that have to hunt or trap outside all winter long seem to be hardened to the temperatures. I’m not sure if it is a adjustment of metabolism or just a deadening of the nerves, but there is a difference in people even here in the artic. Those that spend time outside are generally more acclimated to the weather extremes than those who spend large amounts of time in climate controlled environments.

I think the gym thing was accurate as well. I know people who go to the gym every day for at least a hour, but they get winded just walking on uneven marshy ground or splitting wood. Gyms are designed to work out a specific mussel or small group of mussels while providing for safety so that customers will not become injured. Outdoor work uses multiple mussels all at once in ways that are not always ergonomically friendly, and generally causes repetition or sprain injuries eventually.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:08 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Are we becoming to soft for the outside world?

July 17, 2017 Permafrost 0

First of all I would like to thank founderant, I’ve seen some of this guys gear reviews and I was not impressed from a artic survival standpoint. I may give him another chance on other topics, although he seems very urban. He must be from the southern part of Canada, definitely not a Northwest Territories or Yukon Territory or Nunavut kind of guy.

I agree with his assessment of people. I also agree with his division between preppers and survivalists, although this was a new line of thinking for me.

I think I notice this phenomenon most in the winter here. Those that live & work in the cities are only outside long enough to get to or from their car, or they wait until it warms up to go out on snowmachine for recreation. Those subsistence users that have to hunt or trap outside all winter long seem to be hardened to the temperatures. I’m not sure if it is a adjustment of metabolism or just a deadening of the nerves, but there is a difference in people even here in the artic. Those that spend time outside are generally more acclimated to the weather extremes than those who spend large amounts of time in climate controlled environments.

I think the gym thing was accurate as well. I know people who go to the gym every day for at least a hour, but they get winded just walking on uneven marshy ground or splitting wood. Gyms are designed to work out a specific mussel or small group of mussels while providing for safety so that customers will not become injured. Outdoor work uses multiple mussels all at once in ways that are not always ergonomically friendly, and generally causes repetition or sprain injuries eventually.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:08 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Are we becoming to soft for the outside world?

July 17, 2017 Permafrost 0

First of all I would like to thank founderant, I’ve seen some of this guys gear reviews and I was not impressed from a artic survival standpoint. I may give him another chance on other topics, although he seems very urban. He must be from the southern part of Canada, definitely not a Northwest Territories or Yukon Territory or Nunavut kind of guy.

I agree with his assessment of people. I also agree with his division between preppers and survivalists, although this was a new line of thinking for me.

I think I notice this phenomenon most in the winter here. Those that live & work in the cities are only outside long enough to get to or from their car, or they wait until it warms up to go out on snowmachine for recreation. Those subsistence users that have to hunt or trap outside all winter long seem to be hardened to the temperatures. I’m not sure if it is a adjustment of metabolism or just a deadening of the nerves, but there is a difference in people even here in the artic. Those that spend time outside are generally more acclimated to the weather extremes than those who spend large amounts of time in climate controlled environments.

I think the gym thing was accurate as well. I know people who go to the gym every day for at least a hour, but they get winded just walking on uneven marshy ground or splitting wood. Gyms are designed to work out a specific mussel or small group of mussels while providing for safety so that customers will not become injured. Outdoor work uses multiple mussels all at once in ways that are not always ergonomically friendly, and generally causes repetition or sprain injuries eventually.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:08 am


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Louisiana Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Is it time to get rid of cash?

July 16, 2017 Permafrost 0

Maybe my info is outdated but I thought that cash was the only currency that a business legally had to take. I know that Alaska Airlines did away with cash on the airplanes (meals & drinks) but the only way they got around it was that you could use cash to prepay at the ticket counter for your drinks & such. There was a lawsuit about it, or one started at least, when someone from the village with no CC tried to get a sandwich on the plane and screamed economic discrimination when they wouldn’t take their cash. Not a whole lot of use for a CC in the villages or bush because nobody has the ability to take them even if they want to.

I laugh every time I see this because I wonder why businesses are putting up with it, a service provider takes 3% to 5% of the total bill depending on your plan, plus the $35 monthly fee just for having the “privilege” of taking a CC. This cost is then passed on to customers. This is why businesses give a cash discount, I pay $0.10 less per gallon for fuel if I pay cash. Add to this the problem some businesses have with even getting a service, because they have no land line or internet service, and it boggles the mind that any business would support cashless.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:18 am


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Louisiana Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Is it time to get rid of cash?

July 16, 2017 Permafrost 0

Maybe my info is outdated but I thought that cash was the only currency that a business legally had to take. I know that Alaska Airlines did away with cash on the airplanes (meals & drinks) but the only way they got around it was that you could use cash to prepay at the ticket counter for your drinks & such. There was a lawsuit about it, or one started at least, when someone from the village with no CC tried to get a sandwich on the plane and screamed economic discrimination when they wouldn’t take their cash. Not a whole lot of use for a CC in the villages or bush because nobody has the ability to take them even if they want to.

I laugh every time I see this because I wonder why businesses are putting up with it, a service provider takes 3% to 5% of the total bill depending on your plan, plus the $35 monthly fee just for having the “privilege” of taking a CC. This cost is then passed on to customers. This is why businesses give a cash discount, I pay $0.10 less per gallon for fuel if I pay cash. Add to this the problem some businesses have with even getting a service, because they have no land line or internet service, and it boggles the mind that any business would support cashless.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:18 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: BOL vs Camping or Base

July 16, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
unless “nomadic” is code for raider scum – I don’t see how anyone without a plan for self sufficiency and stocked supplies for backup is going to survive ….. if you have Jeremiah Johnson dreams please will your bear gun to me before you starve to death ….

I’m not seeing how following the caribou herds throughout the year living a nomadic subsistence lifestyle makes a person “raider scum”. Likewise someone who travels from the interior to the coast to fish and then travels to hunting grounds in the north would by definition be nomadic. How are these people raiders or scum. Unless you are talking about raiding the earth for resources to live, but I never figured you for a greenie Illini so I am truly confused.

P.S. I’ll keep my bear gun, I have not starved to death yet and I don’t plan on it in the future. I’m not sure who Jeremiah Johnson is but it seems kind of like a dig at anyone who lives subsistence. People have lived here since the beginning of time hunting and fishing and trapping to feed themselves, moving in small circuits of a few hundred miles and maybe making one big river trip a year for fish. Even if the world all falls apart people will still be able to live here in the artic in this fashion.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:59 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: BOL vs Camping or Base

July 16, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
unless “nomadic” is code for raider scum – I don’t see how anyone without a plan for self sufficiency and stocked supplies for backup is going to survive ….. if you have Jeremiah Johnson dreams please will your bear gun to me before you starve to death ….

I’m not seeing how following the caribou herds throughout the year living a nomadic subsistence lifestyle makes a person “raider scum”. Likewise someone who travels from the interior to the coast to fish and then travels to hunting grounds in the north would by definition be nomadic. How are these people raiders or scum. Unless you are talking about raiding the earth for resources to live, but I never figured you for a greenie Illini so I am truly confused.

P.S. I’ll keep my bear gun, I have not starved to death yet and I don’t plan on it in the future. I’m not sure who Jeremiah Johnson is but it seems kind of like a dig at anyone who lives subsistence. People have lived here since the beginning of time hunting and fishing and trapping to feed themselves, moving in small circuits of a few hundred miles and maybe making one big river trip a year for fish. Even if the world all falls apart people will still be able to live here in the artic in this fashion.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:59 am


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Randon thought – refugees

July 15, 2017 Permafrost 0
Mollypup wrote:
Permafrost ALWAYS trust your instinct.

Sure, sometimes you can’t always nail down exactly why it was triggered, but you obviously picked up on something that set off your sensors. That it did so enough you felt the need to post it makes me think whatever it was it was significant.

That’s the thing Mollypup, dammed if I know what made me think it or why it is still sticking with me even after I’ve slept on it. Maybe its the set-up. One vehicle for scouting, two for cooking/lodging, and one for hauling with the enclosed trailer. I know I’m hyperaware towards people after I come back from the cabin because I never see them, and I’m always trying to figure out what they are doing. Who knows.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 15, 2017 12:09 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Randon thought – refugees

July 15, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I was coming back to town tonight and I saw a convoy of vehicles pulled over at a pullout, and for some reason my first thought was refugees. I have no idea why my mind went there, but it was what I thought as I passed them.

There were 4 vehicles at a pullout, obviously traveling in a group. A jeep, a motorhome, a truck pulling a camper, and a truck pulling a trailer. They were pulled over running a suitcase generator with a power cord running inside the trailer. Lots of kids playing in the grass and the adults all milling about and talking. These were not down on their luck people, all newer vehicles and middle to upper class white people. I don’t know why my mind instantly screamed refugees, but it did. When I think about it they were probably just some group coming back from fishing and were running the gen set to keep their fish frozen in a freezer in the trailer, but at the time it struck me as something different.

I don’t know why I thought what I did, but upon reading some of the headlines I have missed while out of town I am now pondering what I saw. Likewise I have no idea why I’m even posting this, but I think I will take another bucket of rice up with me when I leave town in a few days. It’s not like it will spoil.

Sometimes you chase the raven & it leads you to wonderful places, other times the raven will only lead you to folly.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 15, 2017 4:55 am


A.N.T.S. • Re: Nomadic People

July 15, 2017 Permafrost 0

Most subsistence people in Alaska are nomadic to some extent. Hunting grounds are sometimes hundreds of miles from fishing grounds, and just about everybody has a favorite berry picking spot. Even in a grid down scenario with no gas I would still travel a few hundred miles from the homestead as I collected the resources I needed for the year. I have a “fish camp” that is nothing but a shack and a 15’x15′ smoke house for drying salmon, it is over 250 miles from my cabin by boat and it is only occupied about 3 or 4 weeks a year. My preferred hunting grounds are about 50 miles away by boat, and likewise there is just a shack there. I do not own either of these pieces of land, but I have never had a problem with others being there when I show up. Do I think I’m nomadic, no. Would I be nomadic by a dictionary definition, I guess so, I never gave it much thought. Perhaps it is different here because we are a third world country, we just happen to be a third world country that the americans own. Should something happen I do not see this changing any time soon, there just is not the population here that there is other places.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 15, 2017 4:24 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Grooming

July 15, 2017 Permafrost 0

I cut my hair and beard myself, it drives my wife nuts but she has learned to live with it. Once or twice a year I will take scissors to my beard and cut it as close to the skin as possible, I do my hair the same way every few months. Sometimes when I come home I take electric clippers to my hair and shave it clean because it is never even, one of these years I really need to get a mirror out at the cabin.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 15, 2017 4:05 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: BOL vs Camping or Base

July 15, 2017 Permafrost 0

I’m lucky in the fact that I live at my homestead somewhere between 1/3rd and 2/3rds of the year, depending on the year. On occasion I have pondered the “camping” option, mostly when I was younger and doing it prospecting for gold so it was not much of a stretch.

I think it is a good option if you do it right, but I think few if any will do it right. To make this option work someone would need to go far into the wilderness, and I mean real wilderness. No roads or campgrounds, at least a weeks worth of solid hiking from a trailhead or even better somewhere with no trail. Figure 10 miles a day would put you 70 miles deep into wilderness, but if it was me I would not stop until I walked at least 100 miles. This is not straight line distance, it is actual distance, because of passes and river crossings and such. It might be even better if you can throw in a little pack rafting section to really add a barrier because even most avid backpackers do not carry a pack-raft. I’m sure there are areas like this in the Rockies and parts of the Sierra Nevada ranges, as well as areas in Washington high up in the Cascades. To do a proper camp this would also mean multiple trips carrying a wall tent and stove, food, and other supplies. I figured it out when I was younger and I guessed it would take me about 6 to 8 trips with a 80 pound to 100 pound pack each trip, this adds up to about 2 months to pack in supplies to get set up to last a winter and the next summer. Like I said I was young and going out for months at a time in the summer anyway so I was mostly thinking of wintering over at some good ground so I could mine it all summer the next year. More people would mean fewer trips with the big ticket items like a wood stove & tent but it is still a lot of trips because you have added food and personal gear.

On the bright side if someone takes this rout you can be fairly sure you wont have to deal with very many neighbors. I am a big believer in extreme isolation for ultimate security, but it is also just how my life has always worked out. To live a subsistence lifestyle you need many square miles of hunting/fishing/trapping/gathering/timber land, and you can’t get that unless there are no other people competing for the meager resources. For a “small” group of 8 to 12 people (I would consider this a medium to large group) you would need hundreds of square miles of land to use for the group to survive, it is doable but it will take planning and scouting well ahead of time to see what resources are in the wilderness areas that they could get to. Climate and elevation would also be huge factors in this equation.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 15, 2017 3:48 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Primary Four Prepper Needs

July 15, 2017 Permafrost 0

I think it depends on the situation, but I always went with food water shelter not in that order.

A person needs 2 1/2 gal a day if it is above 80 and they are doing manual labor for all day. Likewise in the winter when it is colder than about -20, all the moisture in the air freezes out and you loose a lot through your skin even if you are not active.

I eat about 4000 or 5000 calories a day in the summer, but I am extremely active and I am also trying to put on about 3 to 5 pounds of fat each month. In the winter I will eat 8000 to 10000 calories a day and still loose weight, but I think nothing of going out and cutting/splitting firewood all day at -50 so take my recommendations with a grain of salt if you are not that active.

I would put shelter before medical or security. Exposure kills more people than dehydration or starvation in emergency situations. In the desert heat a scrap of shade can be more beneficial than a meal in the short term, and on the other side of the spectrum a blizzard will freeze long before you ever get thirsty.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 15, 2017 3:06 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Group Guidelines in Reviewing Appl.

July 1, 2017 Permafrost 0
Cadit wrote:
I know that many think that they will be the lone ranger and do it alone or with just your family. Let’s look at that, and remember the Lone Range had a side kick. But you must stop and think, is it just you and you mate, maybe two or three kids, teenagers, or young adults. Now from the two mates it gets better as the family grows, because; each member now has a roll in life. If its just the two of you, your screwed, security must be maintained daily, who sleeps and who stands watch. two of you, how long can you run on just four (4) hours of sleep each. Sleep studies have shown that the human must have a minimum of six (6) hours of rest to function well. Less than that and you become less capable of normal task and decisions are hard to make.

A group you have more people to share those tasks.

Man Cadit, you are really down on anyone who doesn’t prep like you. Everybody’s situation is different, and what works for some does not work for everyone. Not everyone will have raiders at their door, or even people to contend with.

I’ve been in town now for about 30 something hours and in about 6 hours I will leave town and take my wife up to our scrap of nowhere. In a week or so I will bring her back to town or someone will fly her back. It is 2 hours by road to a boat launch and then another 12 to 16 hours by boat to my place. In the 75 mile by 50 mile area I consider home there are 3 other year around residents. Think about that, 4 people (5 counting my wife when she is there) in a area of 3750 square miles. There are 7 other land owners and seasonal people but some of them have not been up there in decades, bringing the max total population to 12. If I throw in the lower river (60 miles or so long and about 50 miles wide I guess) that would give me maybe another 20 seasonal people at most but add another 3000 square miles. Even now with plentiful resources people do not go there, they do not have the skill to get there or the desire to go that far only to find nothing. Even the family members I have who have been there do not choose to go back, it is to far and there are better (and closer) areas to hunt or fish or trap. I have explained my situation because you always go on about security concerns as a primary reason for groups, and I thought I would illustrate why not all people need to worry about security. Granted my situation is different than most down there, not everybody is isolated in thousands of miles of roadless wilderness and surrounded by a roaming pack of sled dogs, but it is actually fairly common here with subsistence hunters and trappers.

In a week or two I will be back in the world for a few days, and I would actually like to have a discussion about groups vs individuals. Until I get back I hope my post has given you something to think about. Everybody has different circumstances, the goal it to help each other through advice that is best suited to their situation. There is no cookie cutter answer for survival.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 01, 2017 2:39 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Group Guidelines in Reviewing Appl.

July 1, 2017 Permafrost 0
Cadit wrote:
I know that many think that they will be the lone ranger and do it alone or with just your family. Let’s look at that, and remember the Lone Range had a side kick. But you must stop and think, is it just you and you mate, maybe two or three kids, teenagers, or young adults. Now from the two mates it gets better as the family grows, because; each member now has a roll in life. If its just the two of you, your screwed, security must be maintained daily, who sleeps and who stands watch. two of you, how long can you run on just four (4) hours of sleep each. Sleep studies have shown that the human must have a minimum of six (6) hours of rest to function well. Less than that and you become less capable of normal task and decisions are hard to make.

A group you have more people to share those tasks.

Man Cadit, you are really down on anyone who doesn’t prep like you. Everybody’s situation is different, and what works for some does not work for everyone. Not everyone will have raiders at their door, or even people to contend with.

I’ve been in town now for about 30 something hours and in about 6 hours I will leave town and take my wife up to our scrap of nowhere. In a week or so I will bring her back to town or someone will fly her back. It is 2 hours by road to a boat launch and then another 12 to 16 hours by boat to my place. In the 75 mile by 50 mile area I consider home there are 3 other year around residents. Think about that, 4 people (5 counting my wife when she is there) in a area of 3750 square miles. There are 7 other land owners and seasonal people but some of them have not been up there in decades, bringing the max total population to 12. If I throw in the lower river (60 miles or so long and about 50 miles wide I guess) that would give me maybe another 20 seasonal people at most but add another 3000 square miles. Even now with plentiful resources people do not go there, they do not have the skill to get there or the desire to go that far only to find nothing. Even the family members I have who have been there do not choose to go back, it is to far and there are better (and closer) areas to hunt or fish or trap. I have explained my situation because you always go on about security concerns as a primary reason for groups, and I thought I would illustrate why not all people need to worry about security. Granted my situation is different than most down there, not everybody is isolated in thousands of miles of roadless wilderness and surrounded by a roaming pack of sled dogs, but it is actually fairly common here with subsistence hunters and trappers.

In a week or two I will be back in the world for a few days, and I would actually like to have a discussion about groups vs individuals. Until I get back I hope my post has given you something to think about. Everybody has different circumstances, the goal it to help each other through advice that is best suited to their situation. There is no cookie cutter answer for survival.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Jul 01, 2017 2:39 am