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Check In Here Montana Preppers • Re: Bug out drill

December 23, 2017 Permafrost 0

I would shudder to think what would happen if we had to bug out right now. With the warm temps the river ice has not set and we can not get to our cabin. Right now I should already have a trail in for the overland sections and be on my trap line, but …

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A.N.T.S. • Re: One Second After

December 15, 2017 Permafrost 0

Blondie wrote:Today?Permafrost’s sled & his sled team. 8-12" of snow and 0 degrees tonite.Want to trade? It was mid 20’s today and above freezing yesterday. It has been hovering just above or just below freezing for a while now. I am like 10…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: Why Only a Few States?

November 7, 2017 Permafrost 0

Illini Warrior wrote:Alaska doesn’t have food security – the little food they have stocked is just a week’s hedge for a couple of the cities – they are relying on FEMA to ride to the rescue just like all the other states – Alaska just realizes their c…

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General Canning Topics • Re: Vinegar

November 6, 2017 Permafrost 0

catfeet wrote:Use the cloudy bits to start a new "mother" for vinegar from fresh squeezed apple juice.If only we had a supply of apples here. I have tried many times to grow them but it has not happened.Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Mon…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: Why Only a Few States?

November 6, 2017 Permafrost 0

Illini Warrior wrote:most states have their own preparation office – with some buddy of the governor in charge – a PR budget that cranks up the commercials when a disaster season comes around …. real authority to actually get the various state respo…

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General Canning Topics • Vinegar

November 5, 2017 Permafrost 0

So I am in town, and I figured I would catch up on some housekeeping issues since I’m here. I was going through our storage area and I found some expired jugs of vinegar. I am not the biggest believer in expiration dates, but these are like 10 years p…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: Why Only a Few States?

November 5, 2017 Permafrost 0

I am interested to know what states are actively preparing for a nuclear attack. I know Alaska has stockpiles of food in two locations, but they are not for Alaskans. I think it is food for 100,000 people for 30 days, but some may have been added afte…

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General Energy Discussion • Re: Off Grid? Really?

September 30, 2017 Permafrost 0
handyman777 wrote:
Are you ever really “off the grid” ? ? ?

You still have to pay tax’s.

Some places have no property taxes, and if your income is low enough you pay no federal income tax. So yes you can be free, but most will not like the lifestyle they must live to achieve it. I know a few folks who fit in this group, they might get $3000 to $5000 a year trapping and that is their only income. It is not a bad life, if you don’t mind burning rendered bear fat in lamps for your only light all winter long when it’s dark 20 or more hours a day.

I myself am “off grid” at my cabin that I am at about 1/3 to 1/2 the year. The other part of the year I am in town working & living with my family. The only things I have that are electric out there are a solar panel for a 12v freezer, and a 2000W generator for the food-saver & meat grinder. One of these days I want to put in some 12v LED lights, because it is really dark in the winter and I miss the light.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:50 am


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BOL’s and Retreats • Re: You Have Just Finished a Remote BOL…

September 30, 2017 Permafrost 0
Saxon Violence wrote:
Just for the sake of argument—lets suppose that you have a rather remote cabin built somewhere and that you can’t drive any closer than 10 to 20-Miles from your cabin. You’ve stocked your cabin with all of the standard stuff. Given the difficulty of transporting stuff to your cabin, you have to be a bit selective as to exactly what you carry in.

My cabin is over 200 river miles from the nearest road, over 100 miles by snowmachine in the winter. To say that it is difficult to transport things is a understatement. Not only is there weight and space restrictions, but you also have a large amount of breakage. If I need fragile things like globes for my oil lamps or glass jars I need to figure on hauling out double what I need because they will break in transit. Even plastic buckets filled with rice will shatter in the cold if I haul them out there during the winter on a freight sled behind a snowmachine.

When it comes down to it, you need it all to make it in the wilderness for any length of time. If you have it in town and use it to fix or build anything, you will need it or the non-power equivalent of it at your homestead. Add to this everything that is needed too keep it all working, like grease or oil or screws or nails or spare parts or a simple needle & thread. If you sub out dogs or horses for a petroleum powered motor (ATV or snowmachine) you need not only food for them but also meds if they get sick or hurt. Then there are the hidden items like blue board foam insulation that is used for outhouse seats in the winter so your skin does not freeze to the seat, the squirrels love to chew on the stuff so you can count on going through at least a sheet a year. Then you have bear damage, and you either need to be able to make your own lumber to do repairs or have a stockpile of store-bought stuff to fix what gets chewed or clawed on. Then you have personal medical needs, everything from pain meds to suture kits to tree loppers for frostbitten fingers & toes to splints & slings to all the regular meds a person might need for chronic conditions like blood pressure.

I don’t have some of the other stuff you mentioned. No posters or paintings. No books other than a few fiction books that I pick up for free wherever I can get them when I’m in town, when they get stale they are good toilet paper or fire starter. No curtains, it is dark all winter and I will take all the light I can get.

As a general rule, if it goes out there it does not come back. Get quality stuff, because repairs are a pain if you have to charter a plane to drop you parts. If you need a few bolts or a pound of nails, get 10 times what you need because going back to the store is not really a option and they will eventually get used up.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sat Sep 30, 2017 2:32 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 13, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
so if someone has a flat and no spare – OK to ”borrow” a tire off your vehicle and leave you stranded ? … rummage thru someone’s garage for a tool you don’t happen to have … I’m guessing it’s all OK until it happens to U – that’s usually the way it is

Think it depends on your location and frame of mind. I don’t lock my cabin because someone may need something, just about everybody I know does the same as long as they are out of the major cities. Many villages I have lived in people will borrow tools without asking and then bring them back later. I have left my truck at trailheads and come back to find a note saying someone has grabbed one of the three spare tires I carry, they leave contact info and drop it off to me as soon as I am in town to contact them. It is a whole different mentality here. I’ve even seen a state trooper grab a loader off of a construction site to clear a landslide, because it was going to be days for a state crew to get out to do a hour of work.

Different mentality Illini. In a urban or suburban area a breakdown or road blockage is a inconvenience, in a rural area it can be life or death. Get trapped on a drifted in highway (granted ours are 2 lane gravel) at 50 below zero that only gets 4 or 5 vehicles on it in a week and it will kill people if it is not opened to get to those that are trapped in the middle. Even cops & judges understand this here and make allowances for the grater good, just like other everyday folks that own cabins or construction companies. We even have laws on the books that say it is illegal to pass hitchhikers if it is colder than 35 below zero, because if you do they will die. Like I said it’s a different mentality here.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:31 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 13, 2017 Permafrost 0
Illini Warrior wrote:
so if someone has a flat and no spare – OK to ”borrow” a tire off your vehicle and leave you stranded ? … rummage thru someone’s garage for a tool you don’t happen to have … I’m guessing it’s all OK until it happens to U – that’s usually the way it is

Think it depends on your location and frame of mind. I don’t lock my cabin because someone may need something, just about everybody I know does the same as long as they are out of the major cities. Many villages I have lived in people will borrow tools without asking and then bring them back later. I have left my truck at trailheads and come back to find a note saying someone has grabbed one of the three spare tires I carry, they leave contact info and drop it off to me as soon as I am in town to contact them. It is a whole different mentality here. I’ve even seen a state trooper grab a loader off of a construction site to clear a landslide, because it was going to be days for a state crew to get out to do a hour of work.

Different mentality Illini. In a urban or suburban area a breakdown or road blockage is a inconvenience, in a rural area it can be life or death. Get trapped on a drifted in highway (granted ours are 2 lane gravel) at 50 below zero that only gets 4 or 5 vehicles on it in a week and it will kill people if it is not opened to get to those that are trapped in the middle. Even cops & judges understand this here and make allowances for the grater good, just like other everyday folks that own cabins or construction companies. We even have laws on the books that say it is illegal to pass hitchhikers if it is colder than 35 below zero, because if you do they will die. Like I said it’s a different mentality here.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:31 am


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BOB’s & BOV’s • Re: Heavy Equipment Escort

September 10, 2017 Permafrost 0
PatrioticStabilist wrote:
But I sure wouldn’t be trying them out, might be hard to explain to a cop. LOL!

Nice thing about Alaska, there just isn’t that many cops. In the 300 mile stretch between North Anchorage (Wasilla) and Fairbanks I think there are like 3 or 4 state troopers for the whole road. That and it is not uncommon for people to “borrow” equipment from road construction sites on the side of the highway to clear accidents or move the moose that get hit, as long as the site is within 30 miles or so of where the equipment is needed. Although that always freaks out the tourists when you tell them you have to go 10 or 20 miles down the road to grab a loader to pull them out of the ditch, and then show up a hour later in a loader that has random company or state markings on it.

Statistics: Posted by Permafrost — Sun Sep 10, 2017 2:21 am