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Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 22, 2017 maxwonderdog 0
theoutback wrote:
Thanks for posting Max. I’m just finishing up building a barn and probably have about 80% of what is needed left over from the barn build. Looks like it would be much more efficient than other ones I’ve seen. :thumbup:

Sure, this is the book I picked up cheap at a used bookstore, it isn’t as cheap on Amazon, but I wanted a dehydrator smaller and more portable than the plans I was seeing online, so I’m going to give this one a try: https://www.amazon.com/Solar-Food-Dryer … 0865715440

Let us know how your build goes!

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 22, 2017 4:51 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 22, 2017 maxwonderdog 0
theoutback wrote:
Thanks for posting Max. I’m just finishing up building a barn and probably have about 80% of what is needed left over from the barn build. Looks like it would be much more efficient than other ones I’ve seen. :thumbup:

Sure, this is the book I picked up cheap at a used bookstore, it isn’t as cheap on Amazon, but I wanted a dehydrator smaller and more portable than the plans I was seeing online, so I’m going to give this one a try: https://www.amazon.com/Solar-Food-Dryer … 0865715440

Let us know how your build goes!

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 22, 2017 4:51 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 15, 2017 maxwonderdog 0
Fullmoon wrote:
I built a large food dryer to hang bunches of grapes in and make raisins. Keeps the flies off the fruit and stops the birds from stealing the harvest. I used wooden dowels to hang the grapes from. Remove the dowels and insert some galvanized metal lath to place other fruits on to de-hydrate. Works great. Built mine out of 2×2″ frame with a hinged top to allow access from the top and covered with screen door material.

Are you using any materials to concentrate/collect the sun’s rays to heat the food dryer or is it more just an enclosure to keep flies/birds away?

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 15, 2017 5:15 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 15, 2017 maxwonderdog 0
Fullmoon wrote:
I built a large food dryer to hang bunches of grapes in and make raisins. Keeps the flies off the fruit and stops the birds from stealing the harvest. I used wooden dowels to hang the grapes from. Remove the dowels and insert some galvanized metal lath to place other fruits on to de-hydrate. Works great. Built mine out of 2×2″ frame with a hinged top to allow access from the top and covered with screen door material.

Are you using any materials to concentrate/collect the sun’s rays to heat the food dryer or is it more just an enclosure to keep flies/birds away?

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 15, 2017 5:15 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 15, 2017 maxwonderdog 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Ain’t real hard. I stapled nylon screen to frames. Place sliced veggies on screen, sit in sunshine. Take off when dry.

Not rocket science.

The Indians had this figured out long ago. Kill deer. cut into thin strips. Possibly dip into salt, hang to dry.

Yes, except when it takes multiple days to dry, keeping a constant temperature, good airflow and keeping the birds and other animals away can be problematic.

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 15, 2017 4:56 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Re: Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 15, 2017 maxwonderdog 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Ain’t real hard. I stapled nylon screen to frames. Place sliced veggies on screen, sit in sunshine. Take off when dry.

Not rocket science.

The Indians had this figured out long ago. Kill deer. cut into thin strips. Possibly dip into salt, hang to dry.

Yes, except when it takes multiple days to dry, keeping a constant temperature, good airflow and keeping the birds and other animals away can be problematic.

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 15, 2017 4:56 pm


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 15, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

I just picked up a used book in the bookstore that has plans in it to build your own solar dehydrator. Here is another plan on line, this dehydrator is a lot larger than the plans in the book I have, http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/tools/solar-food-dehydrator-plans-zm0z14jjzmar.

Have any of you built a solar dehydrator? It probably won’t happen for me this year but by next year, I would like to build one…

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 15, 2017 1:21 am


No Picture

Drying, Dehydrating, & Smoking • Have you built your own solar dehydrator?

May 15, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

I just picked up a used book in the bookstore that has plans in it to build your own solar dehydrator. Here is another plan on line, this dehydrator is a lot larger than the plans in the book I have, http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/tools/solar-food-dehydrator-plans-zm0z14jjzmar.

Have any of you built a solar dehydrator? It probably won’t happen for me this year but by next year, I would like to build one…

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 15, 2017 1:21 am


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Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

rickdun: you are correct, the lifesaver does not filter heavy metals. I looked at the big berkey but for some reason didn’t purchase it. I will have to look back at my notes and see what stopped me, perhaps incorrect information! You have to have the 2nd arsenic/flouride filters with the big berkey to catch the heavy metals don’t you? Aren’t there two filters, the standard black ones and then the 2nd white flouride filters that filters the heavy metals?

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 3:43 pm


:wave:

Water • Re: Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

rickdun: you are correct, the lifesaver does not filter heavy metals. I looked at the big berkey but for some reason didn’t purchase it. I will have to look back at my notes and see what stopped me, perhaps incorrect information! You have to have the 2nd arsenic/flouride filters with the big berkey to catch the heavy metals don’t you? Aren’t there two filters, the standard black ones and then the 2nd white flouride filters that filters the heavy metals?

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 3:43 pm


:wave:

Water • Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

Hi I recently joined the forum; and just joined the Colorado A.N.T.S. It is great to find like-minded people!

My foray into more serious prepping this past year has been on water and learning more and everything I can about it. The focus has been:
1) We want healthier water NOW to use day to day!
2) We wanted devices/systems that help us day-to-day and also could function if the public water supply suddenly goes away. We are in the city and don’t have a well :(
3) Devices/systems that can be sustained for years to provide drinking water. Portable, replacement parts that can be stored for years, etc.

Water storage and water filtering information is abundant; weeding through it for factual information takes some time! A few things have happened so far for some water independence on our city “homestead” (rain barrels and some experimental UV solar filtering). The item I wanted to discuss today is the Icon LifeSaver products.

On June 24, 2016, we invested in a Lifesaver Cube. I am in no way associated with their company, so am not writing this to “push their product”. After researching, we hoped that this device would meet our above 3 criteria. I wanted to share our experiences, and see if any of the rest of you have tried the LifeSaver devices?

Icon is based in the UK and it is now easier in the US to purchase their products. I see they are selling some devices on Amazon now, they weren’t really selling anywhere else when I purchased. And for something like this, I prefer to purchase direct from the manufacturer for warranty issues if necessary and to insure it is tamper-free, hasn’t been used and repackaged, isn’t some cheap knock-off, etc. So I ordered direct off the Icon LifeSaver website.

Here is the website: http://www.iconlifesaver.com/products/l … r-cube.htm

On their website, they have independent ratings and statistics on what is filtered out of the water. Bacteria, viruses, cycsts are filtered at 99.9% or more (various levels and certifications). This company provides these devices for emergency, humanitarian and military uses as well.

The cube has a built in ceramic filter rated at 5 years with proper care. And the option I purchased has a 5yr supply of carbon filters that are replaced monthly (the filters are sealed in aluminum packaging to prolong their life as carbon filters will degrade quickly). Additional supplies can be purchased in advance and stored for years as Icon seals them in aluminum foil. The cube holds 5 litres of water (about 1.5 gallons), and is rated to filter 5,000 litres of water before the replaceable ceramic filter becomes ineffective. Other than an Icon personal water bottle device, this was the cheapest option to try out their product and see if it works for day-to-day use (basically for two people) easily and effectively.

Thus far we have been using it only to filter tap water for drinking, cooking, and recently watering the seeds we started. We split the seedlings and watered half with water from the lifesaver and the others with tap water. The seedlings watered with the filtered water are definitely growing better, the difference is visible, they are growing faster. However, this could probably be expected with any cheap water filter (bria, etc.) as just removing the chlorine is probably what the plants dislike the most…?

I can tell that the water definitely tastes better, but that is no indication of water if is going to kill you :) I at least drink more because it taste better, and I am one who in the past, does did not stay hydrated enough.

There is an extensive manual about care and maintenance of the ceramic filter of which you really need to read and follow if you want the filtering to work (don’t let the ceramic filter dry out, how to clean it, etc.). It is very durable, I actually dropped the cube from about two feet out of the car the other day and it scratched the outer surface, but nothing broke. I’m not sure it wouldn’t crack if dropped from slightly higher than that, so I’m not planning on trying it :)

My initial plan was to take a sample of local lake water before and after filtering and then send the samples to the local university that does water tests for a reasonable price. This filter isn’t cheap though; so now I am hesitant to put scummy water in it to run the test as what if I can’t get the ceramic filter totally cleaned and then I am going to be worrying about what is left in the filter that is now sitting in the house in the fridge for another 4 years?

I think from the reviews and independent tests that at a minimum, it is a great filter to use in your house with tap water. The cube fits easily on the counter or in the fridge. Because you do pump it to get water, the flow rate is pretty slow, so I usually fill several glass jugs at the same time so when you want to cook or need a larger volume of water, it is already filtered and available quickly. And it is portable to take camping or to the park for picnics, etc. When driving around town working or on roadtrips, I take it along. And following the maintenance is pretty easy as is replacing parts. I really like the design of the cube and the durability.

The con’s are the shipping from the UK, and the price (for the cube, 5yr supply of carbon, and shipping it was $315.95). And for long term SHTF use, I would need to purchase probably another $300 in parts every 3-4 years. The price of the cube is worth it for me as just a tap water filtering device for the home. It is more effective and not really more expensive (over 5 years) than a lot of other home-use advertised systems that probably don’t work as well at filtering, and won’t last as long.

My remaining concern is will the LifeSaver come through in an emergency and we need to filter lake water?
Has anyone else done their own water test without me having to fill mine with lake water and run the tests myself?
Can LifeSaver’s independent tests be trusted for accuracy?
Does anyone else have Icon LifeSaver devices and have you drank lake or stream water filtered out of it, and lived to talk about it? It you have had a device for a while and used non-tap water sources, does the ceramic filter get clogged and stop working prematurely? Does it continue to function with prolonged non-tap water use?

Thanks for your thoughts!

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 2:37 pm


No Picture

Water • Lifesaver Cube Water Filtration Review and Thoughts

May 8, 2017 maxwonderdog 0

Hi I recently joined the forum; and just joined the Colorado A.N.T.S. It is great to find like-minded people!

My foray into more serious prepping this past year has been on water and learning more and everything I can about it. The focus has been:
1) We want healthier water NOW to use day to day!
2) We wanted devices/systems that help us day-to-day and also could function if the public water supply suddenly goes away. We are in the city and don’t have a well :(
3) Devices/systems that can be sustained for years to provide drinking water. Portable, replacement parts that can be stored for years, etc.

Water storage and water filtering information is abundant; weeding through it for factual information takes some time! A few things have happened so far for some water independence on our city “homestead” (rain barrels and some experimental UV solar filtering). The item I wanted to discuss today is the Icon LifeSaver products.

On June 24, 2016, we invested in a Lifesaver Cube. I am in no way associated with their company, so am not writing this to “push their product”. After researching, we hoped that this device would meet our above 3 criteria. I wanted to share our experiences, and see if any of the rest of you have tried the LifeSaver devices?

Icon is based in the UK and it is now easier in the US to purchase their products. I see they are selling some devices on Amazon now, they weren’t really selling anywhere else when I purchased. And for something like this, I prefer to purchase direct from the manufacturer for warranty issues if necessary and to insure it is tamper-free, hasn’t been used and repackaged, isn’t some cheap knock-off, etc. So I ordered direct off the Icon LifeSaver website.

Here is the website: http://www.iconlifesaver.com/products/l … r-cube.htm

On their website, they have independent ratings and statistics on what is filtered out of the water. Bacteria, viruses, cycsts are filtered at 99.9% or more (various levels and certifications). This company provides these devices for emergency, humanitarian and military uses as well.

The cube has a built in ceramic filter rated at 5 years with proper care. And the option I purchased has a 5yr supply of carbon filters that are replaced monthly (the filters are sealed in aluminum packaging to prolong their life as carbon filters will degrade quickly). Additional supplies can be purchased in advance and stored for years as Icon seals them in aluminum foil. The cube holds 5 litres of water (about 1.5 gallons), and is rated to filter 5,000 litres of water before the replaceable ceramic filter becomes ineffective. Other than an Icon personal water bottle device, this was the cheapest option to try out their product and see if it works for day-to-day use (basically for two people) easily and effectively.

Thus far we have been using it only to filter tap water for drinking, cooking, and recently watering the seeds we started. We split the seedlings and watered half with water from the lifesaver and the others with tap water. The seedlings watered with the filtered water are definitely growing better, the difference is visible, they are growing faster. However, this could probably be expected with any cheap water filter (bria, etc.) as just removing the chlorine is probably what the plants dislike the most…?

I can tell that the water definitely tastes better, but that is no indication of water if is going to kill you :) I at least drink more because it taste better, and I am one who in the past, does did not stay hydrated enough.

There is an extensive manual about care and maintenance of the ceramic filter of which you really need to read and follow if you want the filtering to work (don’t let the ceramic filter dry out, how to clean it, etc.). It is very durable, I actually dropped the cube from about two feet out of the car the other day and it scratched the outer surface, but nothing broke. I’m not sure it wouldn’t crack if dropped from slightly higher than that, so I’m not planning on trying it :)

My initial plan was to take a sample of local lake water before and after filtering and then send the samples to the local university that does water tests for a reasonable price. This filter isn’t cheap though; so now I am hesitant to put scummy water in it to run the test as what if I can’t get the ceramic filter totally cleaned and then I am going to be worrying about what is left in the filter that is now sitting in the house in the fridge for another 4 years?

I think from the reviews and independent tests that at a minimum, it is a great filter to use in your house with tap water. The cube fits easily on the counter or in the fridge. Because you do pump it to get water, the flow rate is pretty slow, so I usually fill several glass jugs at the same time so when you want to cook or need a larger volume of water, it is already filtered and available quickly. And it is portable to take camping or to the park for picnics, etc. When driving around town working or on roadtrips, I take it along. And following the maintenance is pretty easy as is replacing parts. I really like the design of the cube and the durability.

The con’s are the shipping from the UK, and the price (for the cube, 5yr supply of carbon, and shipping it was $315.95). And for long term SHTF use, I would need to purchase probably another $300 in parts every 3-4 years. The price of the cube is worth it for me as just a tap water filtering device for the home. It is more effective and not really more expensive (over 5 years) than a lot of other home-use advertised systems that probably don’t work as well at filtering, and won’t last as long.

My remaining concern is will the LifeSaver come through in an emergency and we need to filter lake water?
Has anyone else done their own water test without me having to fill mine with lake water and run the tests myself?
Can LifeSaver’s independent tests be trusted for accuracy?
Does anyone else have Icon LifeSaver devices and have you drank lake or stream water filtered out of it, and lived to talk about it? It you have had a device for a while and used non-tap water sources, does the ceramic filter get clogged and stop working prematurely? Does it continue to function with prolonged non-tap water use?

Thanks for your thoughts!

Statistics: Posted by maxwonderdog — Mon May 08, 2017 2:37 pm