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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anti-Parasitic Remedies

March 19, 2017 Matte 0
MoosePath wrote:
Reading another article, the drug praziquantel which is used for intestinal infections and worms I found is available from Vet Suppliers. Google the drug name and there are all kinds of articles about it’s uses and side effects. But since it is available from Vet suppliers without a prescription it might be a good thing to add to your preps.

Sold, or used to be anyway, as Fish-Tapes by Thomas Labs too. Used it for round worm infection twice in our last dog (who never found anything lying dead in the woods that wasn’t still good enough to try eating). Speaking of which, I need to check the purchase date on that fish-tapes bottle… Mebendazole, metronidazole, and permethrin cream (10%) in the pharmacy as well. Public shelters, road kill cuisine, dumpster diving, incomplete water purification – parasitic infections may be common following a major disaster.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Mar 19, 2017 8:59 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMPs (Electro Magnetic Pulse)

March 2, 2017 Matte 0

pH meter, good idea.

Solar charge controllers, smoke/CO detectors, pulse oximeter, motion sensors, and someday spare NV scopes are some others in mine. Smart phone and Geiger counter will go in the cage once my company upgrades my current iPhone leaving me a spare one.

Solar panels (mono/polycrystalline types anyway) should be OK to leave unprotected if not installed in a system according to the testing in the attachment.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Thu Mar 02, 2017 6:42 am


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 26, 2017 Matte 0

I do not understand all those exclamation points Swamp. I’ve advised against making an anesthetic, recommended learning to treat more common ailments painlessly first, and only suggested general anesthesia in layman’s hands as an option to relieve suffering for the dying at the end of the world. What I have been suggesting, and I do follow my own advice, is that you may want to have the tools that the talented might need to save your a$$. I’m not going to pay the inflated rates for drugs in short supply during a disaster if I can acquire them inexpensively now. If you don’t see a need for anesthetics in a disaster/collapse, then don’t get any Swamp. I am sorry you’ve seen such tragedies, each is worthy of it’s own thread so we all might learn something from them?

But back on topic, and more basic, local anesthesia might be a better place to start putting a few dollars now. It’s not just good for local infiltration for suturing or ingrown toenails, in the right hands it can be used for nerve or Bier blocks, or epidurals, to anesthetize much larger areas for more invasive procedures. Lidocaine is good and relatively easy to acquire without a scrip, for longer term storage you can get it in powder form which has a longer shelf life than the liquid. Unless it’s going to be strictly for local infiltration you probably don’t want the kind with epinephrine in it. Stock the extra items they’ll most likely need, sterile syringes, needles (small, 20-23 gauge), and gloves at least. If going with the powdered lidocaine variety then the prefilled saline flush syringes would be a good idea, for dissolving the powder in. The prepacked and sterile laceration trays might be good too, even if it’s not a laceration being treated (~$10 and up, get the ones that include sterile gloves imo).

Regarding the professionals that avoid threads like this, maybe they’d be able to suggest what they’d hope a patient would bring with them if they were open for business but running low on supplies at the EOTW?

Murby wrote:
Well folks, it looks like my anesthesia problem has been solved!

In a word “Ether”… yup.. it is that simple and its something the average person can purchase. Its also safe, well… safe in relative context. its easy to use and from what I can tell, seems to be the type of drug that allows one to select the level of sedation.

While I will be purchasing a small supply of it, I also learned its not even that difficult to make if one has access to a grade school level chemistry set.. (which I do).. and I’ve downloaded the instructions and a video on the procedure to manufacture it.

I’m not an expert on it obviously and still have much research to do.. but from what I can tell, I can buy a 500ml bottle for $50 that is enough to completely anesthetize at least 20 to 30 times….

That’s what I chose, it’s the old school standard and no legal issues. You have more lab knowledge than me, I wouldn’t feel confident trying to produce it – some minor pharmaceutical compounding (and some pyrotechnics) are my only experience since high school chemistry. Be careful what ever you do, personally I wouldn’t use it (except as mentioned above) unless at the EOTW and the situation so bad that there was no penalty for surgical failure.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:46 pm


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 25, 2017 Matte 0

Could always consult a medical dictionary :) Won’t argue with someone’s personal feelings or religious beliefs daaswampman, if it’s wrong for you then it’s wrong.

Back on topic, the Anesthesia and Perioperative Care of the Combat Casualty details the different types of anesthesia in use today. Chapter 31 is the history of military anesthesia (or lack thereof). Chapter 7 is a detailed description of military anesthesia machines, including the UNIVERSAL PORTABLE ANESTHESIA CIRCUIT (PAC) which is a vaporizer/”draw over” anesthesia device for administering liquid anesthestics that doesn’t require supplemental oxygen. It has built in settings for use with diethyl ether, enflurane, halothane, and isoflurane. A significant improvement over open drop administration, and about as simple and portable as an anesthesia machine can be done (short of “bottle and rag” anyway). Following a collapse, and after the IV anesthetic agents are exhausted, seems reasonable this or it’s improvised analogues might be the standard both because of simplicity and the relative ease that ether can be produced in a lab. Military level 2 med units (the lowest level where emergency surgery can be performed) use these PACs, so you’d be likely to see them in any significant disaster where the military was sent to assist. Plan accordingly.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat Feb 25, 2017 1:20 pm


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 25, 2017 Matte 0
In medicine, specifically in end-of-life care, palliative sedation (also known as terminal sedation, continuous deep sedation, or sedation for intractable distress in the dying/of a dying patient) is the palliative practice of relieving distress in a terminally ill person in the last hours or days of a dying patient’s life, usually by means of a continuous intravenous or subcutaneous infusion of a sedative drug, or by means of a specialized catheter designed to provide comfortable and discreet administration of ongoing medications via the rectal route. Palliative sedation is an option of last resort for patients whose symptoms cannot be controlled by any other means. It is not a form of euthanasia, as the goal of palliative sedation is to control symptoms, rather than to shorten the patient’s life.

From the wiki just so we’re on the same page. Terminal sedation is not euthanasia.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Feb 24, 2017 7:00 pm


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 24, 2017 Matte 0

https://www.washingtonpost.com/postever … l-supplies

Leaving her daughter’s side, Yamila went on a frantic search for medical supplies so basic that no hospital — let alone one of the country’s largest teaching hospitals — should ever run out of them. But none of the hospitals or pharmacies she visited had them in stock. In the end, despite concerns about the quality of the supplies, and unsure whether she had the correct catheters and needles for a newborn, Yamila had no option but to buy whatever she could find on the black market — with no quality guarantees.

Venezuela’s health care system, long a source of pride for the government, is in deep crisis. Thousands of patients cannot get essential medical treatments, and thousands more have been wait-listed for potentially life-saving surgery because doctors don’t have the materials they need to operate.

http://time.com/4419186/photographing-v … -collapse/

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala puts it bluntly: “Venezuela has become hell.”

The photographer had just returned from one of his latest trips to the South American nation when he talked to TIME, and he was visibly affected by the chaos he had witnessed there. “There’s a complete collapse of society,” he said.

Once an example for the continent, Venezuela is now a country in freefall. “It’s hard to find food, there’s no medicine,” said Ybarra Zavala. “If you have to have surgery, you need to bring everything with you: the bandages, the gloves, everything. There are no anesthetics.”

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2016/05/1 … ls-or.html

Caracas, Venezuela – At Caracas University Hospital (HUC), the shortage of medical supplies is beyond painful.

Dozens of patients here have been waiting for months to undergo surgery as their health continues to deteriorate. In many cases, their lives are at risk and they are asked to bring their own medical supplies. Doctors say they want to help but can’t.

A physician who asked to remain anonymous told Fox News Latino this week that they are only performing emergency operations at this time due to the acute shortage of the most basic supplies and instruments at the state-run facility.

“We don’t even have stitching material, gauze pads or medical solution and most of the equipment for anesthesia is broken,” he said. “If the patient brings everything, we try to operate.”

Don’t think anyone would classify the Venezuelan crisis as an end-of-the-world situation, yet there’s the reality of medical care in Venezuela today. Plan accordingly. I completely agree on insurance, particularly in a collapse. Bring money (cash, gold, or lots of silver). You’ll need it to get to the front of the line, and to bribe, I mean show your appreciation, to the doctors, nurses, and orderlies for the best care possible.

The scenario/pics at the end of my last post was meant in the context of humane terminal sedation (palliative end-of-life) in an EOTW situation, not as part of first-aid care. i.e., “Relax Son, we need to sedate you so we can get you out of there. Just breathe normally and you’ll be waking up in your bed before you know it”, even though you know that’s probably not going to be the case. Just clarifying that as it may not have been clear the way I stated it earlier. It’s just an option some may want to consider, although diethyl ether wouldn’t be my first choice of an agent.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Feb 24, 2017 6:10 pm


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 21, 2017 Matte 0
MoosePath wrote:
I’ve been reading this thread and I thought I would add my 2 cents for what it is worth. While I have no desire to make any anesthesia (heck I can hardly spell it). I have to say that if we are in a total collapse/grid down situation with out hospitals and doctors a phone call away I do not see a problem with people trying to find a way to put someone under.

Ether was used for anesthesia for over 100 years, it was the standard up to the 1960’s. It’s been suggested it still has its uses.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4608178

Ether in the developing world: rethinking an abandoned agent

Diethyl ether anesthesia deserves to be reconsidered for widespread use in the developing world. In countries that lack the resources to fund anesthesiology development, ether could greatly improve the safety and economics of anesthesia practices.

Developing nations rarely have the personnel and equipment to provide safe anesthesia. Anesthesia is most commonly delivered by non-physicians who have little or no formal training. Cardiac monitors, pulse-oximeters, supplemental oxygen and endotracheal intubation are rarely available, and anesthesia is delivered using drawover techniques. Halothane, the most common inhalation anesthetic in the developing world, is a potent agent and, without monitoring equipment and trained providers, can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. Ether, on the other hand is nontoxic to the cardiovascular system and it does not depress respiratory activity. It is safe to use by anesthetists who have not received formal training and without complicated monitoring, supplemental oxygen and endotracheal intubation. Ether has the added benefit of providing surgical analgesia. In areas where resources are scarce, patients are often not given supplemental intraoperative analgesia. While halothane provides little analgesia, ether provides excellent intra-operative pain control that can extend for several hours into the postoperative period.

It’s not without it’s problems, extremely flammable, forms explosive peroxides if not stored properly, nausea/vomiting are common afterwards. It’s still the reference used in medical school to teach the stages of anesthesia, so while it may not be used anymore every doctor knows how it works and how it’s administered. Along the same lines as taking your own sterile syringes/IV catheters if travelling to developing countries in case you require medical care while there, or storing antibiotics in the event the one your doctor prescribes isn’t available, some might wish to have ether in the event there is a doctor available but he doesn’t have a better anesthestic.

And as already mentioned, there’s always the possibility of something like this at the EOTW…

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Statistics: Posted by Matte — Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:40 am


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 21, 2017 Matte 0
MoosePath wrote:
I’ve been reading this thread and I thought I would add my 2 cents for what it is worth. While I have no desire to make any anesthesia (heck I can hardly spell it). I have to say that if we are in a total collapse/grid down situation with out hospitals and doctors a phone call away I do not see a problem with people trying to find a way to put someone under.

Ether was used for anesthesia for over 100 years, it was the standard up to the 1960’s. It’s been suggested it still has its uses.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4608178

Ether in the developing world: rethinking an abandoned agent

Diethyl ether anesthesia deserves to be reconsidered for widespread use in the developing world. In countries that lack the resources to fund anesthesiology development, ether could greatly improve the safety and economics of anesthesia practices.

Developing nations rarely have the personnel and equipment to provide safe anesthesia. Anesthesia is most commonly delivered by non-physicians who have little or no formal training. Cardiac monitors, pulse-oximeters, supplemental oxygen and endotracheal intubation are rarely available, and anesthesia is delivered using drawover techniques. Halothane, the most common inhalation anesthetic in the developing world, is a potent agent and, without monitoring equipment and trained providers, can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. Ether, on the other hand is nontoxic to the cardiovascular system and it does not depress respiratory activity. It is safe to use by anesthetists who have not received formal training and without complicated monitoring, supplemental oxygen and endotracheal intubation. Ether has the added benefit of providing surgical analgesia. In areas where resources are scarce, patients are often not given supplemental intraoperative analgesia. While halothane provides little analgesia, ether provides excellent intra-operative pain control that can extend for several hours into the postoperative period.

It’s not without it’s problems, extremely flammable, forms explosive peroxides if not stored properly, nausea/vomiting are common afterwards. It’s still the reference used in medical school to teach the stages of anesthesia, so while it may not be used anymore every doctor knows how it works and how it’s administered. Along the same lines as taking your own sterile syringes/IV catheters if travelling to developing countries in case you require medical care while there, or storing antibiotics in the event the one your doctor prescribes isn’t available, some might wish to have ether in the event there is a doctor available but he doesn’t have a better anesthestic.

And as already mentioned, there’s always the possibility of something like this at the EOTW…

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Statistics: Posted by Matte — Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:40 am


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 20, 2017 Matte 0

Terrible situation, sounds like you did everything you could.

I’d prefer to be given the choice, some might want to be prepared to offer that choice to others. That many others have died painfully throughout history wouldn’t be much consolation for a spouse or parent of the deceased. Different strokes I suppose.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:22 pm


First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 19, 2017 Matte 0

Starting smaller with common/minor procedures that can be done with local anesthesia makes sense, but you don’t get to choose the injury you may be presented with at the EOTW either.

Maybe I’m just in a particularly morbid mood today, but what’s the plan for dealing with an eviscerating chainsaw accident? Or a crushed pelvis and internal hemorrhaging if someone is run over by a car? No 911, no EMS, no hospitals. Conscious patient in agony, maybe only for minutes or maybe death is still hours away. Deal with it as you might for an animal? This is where I think Murby’s question has merit.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Feb 19, 2017 2:45 pm


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 19, 2017 Matte 0
Murby wrote:
This is turning out to be more complicated than I was initially giving it credit for… Lots more work to be done.

Same here. Don’t get discouraged, maybe just back up and start with something simpler. Ingrown toenails? Incision and drainage? Tooth extraction? If you put some study and resources into how to deal with those near-painlessly I’d rather have you as my TEOTWAWKI medic than any ten First Aid&compression only CPR&AED certificate holders. Maybe not at the scene of my injury auto accident or in the next cubicle if I have a heart attack or go into cardiac arrest tomorrow, but definitely at the EOTW.

Murby wrote:
You all have to admit, being able to successfully anesthetize someone in a SHFT situation could make life a lot easier and a lot less ugly when it comes to the inevitable injuries that will occur.

True, burn debridement comes to mind. Could make an inevitable death a lot easier too.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat Feb 18, 2017 7:38 pm


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 18, 2017 Matte 0

I’m with you up to a point but then you lose me. The “some kind of “knock you unconscious” drug” comment suggests some more study may be beneficial if that’s the best way you can describe what the goal is.

But more than that, seems to me you’re coming at this from the wrong direction too. Why not build a list of the anesthetics that have the properties you require and that fit the constraints/limitations you’ll be working under first.

– Level of sedation required
– Route of administration limitations
– Doesn’t have respiratory / cardio depressive effects
– High margin of safety between therapeutic and lethal dosages
– Reversal agent availability

Then determine if it’s possible to manufacture those (if you must)? Think you’ll find it’s going to be a very short list, and even shorter if you remove those that are scheduled drugs.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat Feb 18, 2017 11:34 am


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Economic Disasters • Re: So for investors who hold physical gold and silver, 2017

February 17, 2017 Matte 0
In the scramble for surviving resources, survivors may develop a domestic mode of production in which currency will be displaced by barter for exchanges of subsistence goods and a system of fixed allocations may be established. Currency is likely to be confined to the prestige sphere, or for obtaining particularly lumpy goods, and probably will consist of precious metals and gems.

From the article I posted a link to above. That’s the researchers conclusion based on studies of prior events, history may not repeat but it often rhymes.

A few rifle cartridges for a few eggs, some batteries for a blanket, boot repair in exchange for a few pounds of salt, that is subsistence type bartering. It will likely occur between neighbors or those in close proximity very early following a collapse. Later, once some order and security and a means for dispute arbitration exists, then in peasant marketplaces set up for trading subsistence type goods. Hand to mouth existence stuff, small quantities of silver might be useful here.

Lumpy goods/services would be things like medical services, land or homes, multiple head of cattle, getting your 1000 gallon propane or diesel tank refilled, a new tractor, or a winter’s worth of split firewood. Prestige is power within the group, clan, or community, the ability to influence people and get favorable outcomes in disputes. It might be fun to fantasize about the stupid rich people or clueless community leaders begging you to take their luxury items in exchange for a loaf of bread, but it’s not very realistic. At least some of their pre-collapse prestige will carry over initially and they’ll be trying to organize people and resources, whether you’re seen as one of the organizers or one of the organizees (is that a word?) depends on your prestige.

And there’s going to be black markets, even during the siege of Leningrad when some had resorted to cannibalism there was still food for purchase if you could afford it. If you want larger quantities of rationed or contraband items, or extra ration cards, this is probably where you’ll need to shop.

If you can afford to pay cash for expensive prestige/lumpy goods now, without using payment plans or insurance or credit, and you want to be able to continue to do so following a major societal collapse, that’s where gold is likely to be your best bet. This is how I see it paying out in a sudden societal collapse anyway, within a few weeks some structure (not necessarily good) will start to take shape out of the chaos.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Feb 17, 2017 10:10 am


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 17, 2017 Matte 0
Murby wrote:
If you needed a limb amputated or a bullet pulled, would you rather die in your sleep from an anesthetic mistake or die in agony from shock?? Not sure about everyone else but I’d choose the anesthesia.

That’s interesting, from the standpoints of say needing an emergency anesthetic for amputating a trapped limb to free a victim or for use as a euthanasia drug (whether that was the intent or not). If it was my arm that was mangled and stuck in a piece of equipment, or my leg trapped under building debris, I might agree that you anesthetize me before taking a hacksaw to my limb.

Still not understanding why you want to manufacture an anesthetic agent yourself however. You wouldn’t be able to produce an agent nearly as pure as even lab grade reagent quality in your kitchen, it’ll require time to do so that you may not have, the supplies and equipment would likely be ten times or more the cost of just purchasing it, and the purchased product will come in an appropriate container (with preservatives and stabilizers, if needed) for transport and storage already. Why make it?

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:09 am


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First Aid & Medicine • Re: Anesthesia – How?

February 16, 2017 Matte 0

Why make it? I don’t advise this, it’s just been an incredibly slow day at work and I’m killing time :)

Might see the “SHTF Pain Killers” thread, near the end. Then google on “open drop ether”.

See the attachment on this post for a different method.

For local anesthesia, google “lidocaine survival”.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Thu Feb 16, 2017 5:08 pm


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Economic Disasters • Re: So for investors who hold physical gold and silver, 2017

February 16, 2017 Matte 0

Saw this referenced elsewhere, Markets, Distribution, and Exchange after Societal Cataclysm.

It’s somewhat dated but the different scenarios it presents makes sense in my unlearned opinion. If you’re in a hurry skip to chapter 7 (“The Worst Case”). But the “Resource Abundance” or “Institution Intensive” scenarios may be more likely if you live in rural/agricultural or an urban area, respectively.

Very dry reading, maybe best saved for a rainy day ( :) ) but I thought it was informative and a good starting point for a rational/responsible discussion on how barter and markets might work following a disaster. Gold isn’t always best for example, and yes you will still have to pay taxes (with something, to somebody).

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:03 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Shall we play a game, IV?

February 15, 2017 Matte 0

You just laid out what I consider the best-case scenario for us if a prolonged SHTF event occurred. One that started in December would be much worse for the unprepared around here, but really might be the best for us. We have what we need to live semi-comfortably til spring and then some, and remoteness and unplowed roads blocking most vehicle travel will help isolate us from anyone looking to cause trouble. We’d be happy to be snowed in and just wait it out.

How do you get there? Snowmobile.
How do you get back? Same
What do you take with you? See below
What clothing/equipment do you have for the journey? We’re prepared clothing wise, suits, boots, helmets, gloves, facemasks, etc. Slung rifle. HT radio. Have a 3′ X 8′ sled we could tow for larger items if needed, ratchet straps and cordage. Each snowmobile has a small emergency kit, heavy on fire-making and first aid, but some food (candy/power/clif bars), spare AA batts, and a tow rope. The snowmobiles each have factory toolkits already (and I added a few extra items), plus a spare drive belt and spare spark plugs. In suit pockets I have an area map, compass, flashlight, spare batteries, and more fire-making equipment (this gear stays in my suit year round).

This scenario is an easy one for us, been doing this for decades for fun and have experience rescuing stranded people and recovering stuck/dead snowmobiles. Our safety/trip rules have changed over the years with new techology and much more reliable snowmobiles now than in decades past. Currently, if traveling with just one snowmobile we stay within VHF radio range of home (about 16 miles with our 50′ base antenna, cell service is spotty at best), if going further we take two snowmobiles in case one breaks down. Even for short rides we communicate our trip plan to those staying behind, if nobody is home to file the plan with we leave it in the note. Have two sets of cross-county skis and a pair of snowshoes but breaking trail is slow, hard work. With a snowmobile (and a half gallon of gas) I’d be there and back in about 15 minutes.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:01 am


:offtopic:

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Shall we play a game, IV?

February 15, 2017 Matte 0

You just laid out what I consider the best-case scenario for us if a prolonged SHTF event occurred. One that started in December would be much worse for the unprepared around here, but really might be the best for us. We have what we need to live semi-comfortably til spring and then some, and remoteness and unplowed roads blocking most vehicle travel will help isolate us from anyone looking to cause trouble. We’d be happy to be snowed in and just wait it out.

How do you get there? Snowmobile.
How do you get back? Same
What do you take with you? See below
What clothing/equipment do you have for the journey? We’re prepared clothing wise, suits, boots, helmets, gloves, facemasks, etc. Slung rifle. HT radio. Have a 3′ X 8′ sled we could tow for larger items if needed, ratchet straps and cordage. Each snowmobile has a small emergency kit, heavy on fire-making and first aid, but some food (candy/power/clif bars), spare AA batts, knife (small folder), and a tow rope. The snowmobiles each have factory toolkits already (and I added a few extra items), plus a spare drive belt and spare spark plugs. In suit pockets I have an area map, compass, flashlight, knife (4″ semi-serrated folder), spare batteries, and more fire-making equipment (this gear stays in my suit year round).

This scenario is an easy one for us, been doing this for decades for fun and have experience rescuing stranded people and recovering stuck/dead snowmobiles. Our safety/trip rules have changed over the years with new technology and much more reliable snowmobiles now than in decades past. Currently, if traveling with just one snowmobile we stay within VHF radio range of home (about 16 miles with our 50′ base antenna, cell service is spotty at best), if going further we take two snowmobiles in case one breaks down. Even for short rides we communicate our trip plan to those staying behind, if nobody is home to file the plan with we leave it in the note. Have two sets of cross-county skis and a pair of snowshoes but breaking trail is slow, hard work. With a snowmobile (and a half gallon of gas) I’d be there and back in about 15 minutes.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:01 am


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Personal Safety and Home Security • Re: Dakota alert

February 6, 2017 Matte 0

Two battery holders like this would fit in the case: http://www.ebay.com/itm/6-0-Volt-DC-Bat … 2018937421 Just connect the black wire on one holder to the red wire on the other, then the remaining black and red from each holder to the +/- on the transmitter.

Mil spec/mil std reliability for a reasonable cost would be great. They’re 95% as is imo, but better weather proofing, a built in programmable relay, and external jacks for power and relay contacts, and being able to program your own alert message(s) maybe.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Mon Feb 06, 2017 7:27 am


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Medical Experts • Re: SHTF Pain Killers?

February 5, 2017 Matte 0
sageprice wrote:

Pedro wyoming wrote:

Major French wrote:For emergency surgery, you could use starting fluid to put somebody order. It has ether. You could use it for things like dental extraction.

No. starting fluid is MOSTLY ether but also has light aromatic hydrocarbons (VOCs) that are very hazardous to ones health. They target the liver and central nervous system primarily but also cause other problems.
However…
It can be easily manufactured using a variety of methods. The simplest is alcohol condensation. I checked as i was writing this and there are youtube videos on this very subject. The one i watched is simple, safe and straightforward…boil ethyl alcohol and pass the vapour through a hot sulphuric acid bath and then through a reflux condenser. Google reflux condenser, vigreux (sp?) column or packed column. this is the only specialised piece of equipment that is needed. One can easily make this as well once the design is understood.

The only caveat is that ALL heat sources MUST be oil bath electrical. Any spark or flame or even electric coil glowing any shade of red will likely result in disasterous conflagration.

pW

TRY this instead https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Z2oE8-uthU Make your own

Or go the easy route. Assayed 99.+% pure, and much safer for storage this way too.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Feb 05, 2017 9:48 am


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Personal Safety and Home Security • Re: Dakota alert

February 5, 2017 Matte 0

Congrats, I’m a fan of them as well. You may find this article helpful: http://modernsurvivalonline.com/mat-mod … ansmitter/

Still running a couple of mine off ~12v since that article was written without any problems or failures. My oldest MAT is about 10 years old now and still works, the MURS HT I bought at the same time has been bulletproof as well even with some fairly regular abuse by kids.

I know Dakota Alert changed the recorded alert messages to a woman’s voice in recent years, if the boards in your MATs are different than the ones in the article I’d appreciate seeing a pic of them if possible. Thanks and good luck with them.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Feb 05, 2017 8:43 am