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Medical Experts • Re: Anti-Biotics

March 15, 2018 Matte 0

Mentioned in a different thread (viewtopic.php?f=95&t=32961#p531792) that, in my opinion, doxycycline was maybe the single best all-around prepper antibiotic to have. Well, just finished reading "Venezuela Faces the Return of Forgotten Disea…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: E-Books

January 25, 2018 Matte 0

My company gives us the option of purchasing our current laptop when they issue new ones, so I’ve bought a couple. I prefer a desktop PC for personal use so the laptops are in faraday cages since they’re just backups and would largely sit unused anyw…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: E-Books

January 25, 2018 Matte 0

My company gives us the option of purchasing our current laptop when they issue new ones, so I’ve bought a couple. I prefer a desktop PC for personal use so the laptops are in faraday cages since they’re just backups and would largely sit unused anyw…

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Medical Experts • Re: POTASSIUM IODIDE TABLETS

January 18, 2018 Matte 0

I don’t work in Emergency Management but FWIW, there might not be any official statement until state/local emergency management had acquired KI (if they didn’t already have it) from the Strategic National Stockpile maintained by the CDC, and setup loc…

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A.N.T.S. • Re: Medical Emergencies

November 24, 2017 Matte 0

One thing I’ve noticed is that it’s not usually physicians or facilities that are in short supply during most disasters – but the supplies and drugs that are. Another is that there’s usually a black market where these items can be obtained for those …

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

November 17, 2017 Matte 0

NJMike wrote:It’s still not high up on my immediate threat radar, but I have begun researching the proper antibiotics to keep my fish healthy.This website details some ABs for treatment of Yersinia Pestis:https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/ … me…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

November 17, 2017 Matte 0

NJMike wrote:It’s still not high up on my immediate threat radar, but I have begun researching the proper antibiotics to keep my fish healthy.This website details some ABs for treatment of Yersinia Pestis:https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/ … me…

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Pandemic Preparedness • Re: Pneumonic Plague

November 3, 2017 Matte 0

Somewhat dated article, but just the most current example I could find that mentioned anything about possible antibiotic resistance:So far 11 Yersinia pestis strains have been isolated, and tests show that all are sensitive to antibiotics recommended …

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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Needful Things

October 29, 2017 Matte 0

3-in-1 post OK? Less common stuff maybe, or stuff it’s hard to have too many/much of (plus trade value).(Un)Fasteners:hose clampscable tiesgluesJB-Weldhacksaw bladespropane torchO-ringsGoopsoldering ironratchet strapsmoldable plasticmetal strappingMe…

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General Food Topics • Re: Comparing dried food companies

October 21, 2017 Matte 0

I’ve heard a lot of good about Mountain House, and lots of bad about Wise. Never tried either. I can vouch for Honeyville products, we don’t buy a lot of storage food in #10 cans but when we do it’s from them and never been disappointed on the produ…

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General Food Topics • Re: Comparing dried food companies

October 21, 2017 Matte 0

I’ve heard a lot of good about Mountain House, and lots of bad about Wise. Never tried either. I can vouch for Honeyville products, we don’t buy a lot of storage food in #10 cans but when we do it’s from them and never been disappointed on the produ…

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General Food Topics • Re: Comparing dried food companies

October 21, 2017 Matte 0

I’ve heard a lot of good about Mountain House, and lots of bad about Wise. Never tried either. I can vouch for Honeyville products, we don’t buy a lot of storage food in #10 cans but when we do it’s from them and never been disappointed on the produ…

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General Energy Discussion • Re: Off Grid? Really?

September 30, 2017 Matte 0

Off-grid here, or at least from the standpoint that we have no public utility services. Private well, private septic, solar electric power with generator backup. A land-line phone, sat internet, and DirecTV are our links to the outside world. I suppose we’re not off-grid by your definition, in fact as I type this I’m listening to a semi-loud cooling fan running on our ten year old Xantrex inverter/charger in the background – 3 mostly cloudy days in a row drained our batteries to the point that it started our propane generator to recharge them. Not really a problem, in fact we use this time to do the laundry, run the dishwasher, vacuum the carpeted areas, fill the empty toilet flush buckets, and fire up the computer I’m using now. All the electricity I want for about 4 hours, as long as I keep it under the 4kw limit of the inverter at any given time lol. Later we may even make some microwave popcorn and watch half a movie before falling asleep with the TV on, those are kind of special treat things for us when the generator is running.

No goats, chickens, or other livestock. Our garden is modest in the extreme and we don’t home can food. When the primary propane tank runs low 2-3 times a year, I call for a fill up. We’re not self-sufficient, just semi self-reliant for maybe up to a year with stored beans, bullets, and bandaids. We’re good with that, it’d be difficult to keep more than that amount of everything in rotation before it spoiled anyway. Not that we chose this lifestyle solely from a strict prepper/survival perspective, it’s just how we choose to live and we enjoy it.

Suppose I’m really not sure what you’re asking, and those that might meet your definition of off-grid likely wouldn’t have enough excess power to waste posting a response in an internet forum anyway. But whatever you define “off-grid” as, just do it if it appeals to you and find your own sweet spot would be my suggestion.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Sep 29, 2017 8:57 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 5, 2017 Matte 0
daaswampman wrote:
My best advice: be something worthwhile and maintain a solid relationship with your local Sheriff! The “Wild Card” is property rights and who determines them! Deeds are likely to be as valuable as currency. Swamp

Sounds like good advice. One of the reasons I’d be cautious about buying deeded or titled property if the SHTF, it’d be very difficult to confirm the seller was the owner (or even the sole owner) of the real estate or titled property. And even if they have title and sign it over for a fair price, the seller could argue they only agreed under duress after normalcy returns, assuming all private contracts made during the event weren’t just declared null and void afterwards. I think there may be some precedance for that occurring in past disasters, but too lazy to investigate at the moment.

MrDanB wrote:
Since history repeats itself, it is wise to remember that the average Gov. Issued paper note lasts about 250 years. The debt ceiling issue is coming soon, gold and (especially) silver are heavily manipulated and many nations have been buying up metals in record quantities.
We are in a currency war right now, and currency wars always lead to real wars. During the Weimar Republic crisis, a fistful of gold would have bought an entire city block of downtown Berlin. Many currencies have failed since then. We all see what’s going on in Venezuela right now. How far do you think metals will go during a full on currency crises? In Venezuela, today, a 1/10 Oz gold eagle will more than fill a freezer with meat. We pay roughly 140ish dollars for that same coin here in the US right now. Try filling your freezer with meat for 140 bucks!
It’s all going to depend on how things play out. If it’s full on SHTF, then metals will be the last thing on my mind. But if we continue down the “slow burn” road that were on, then metals will go up in value. At some point, the manipulation of the paper value of metals will end. An excellent video explaining all of this is:
https://youtu.be/iFDe5kUUyT0

Haven’t watched the vid yet, but Venezuela is a great example of a slow motion economic/political SHTF, and not too hard to imagine something similar in store for the US at some point. Like the frog in a slowly warmed pot of water, things just steadily get a little bit worse. I wonder how many Venezuelans wished they’d have packed up and left 5 years ago, and would love to do so now but just can’t afford to? Read a news article recently that obtaining a passport and travel permission in Venezuela requires bribing gov’t bureaucrats to get approved, so leaving isn’t an option for the poorer ones (now) who burned though their savings due to inflation over the years. In prepper parlance they didn’t bugout in time, and now they’re trapped.

Speaking of SHTF bribes, thought about mentioning them in my last post but it was getting long’ish enough already. It is worthy of discussion I think. Whether it’s bribing bureaucrats for an extra ration card, paying off the police/judge for some petty infraction enforced only as a means to generate revenue for the local government, or paying protection money to some criminal organization to leave you and your family/business alone. Still using Venezuela as an example, who (and how much) do you have to pay to keep you and your family members from getting ‘drafted’ into something like this?

I can imagine a lot of situations like this in any number of different severe SHTF scenarios. Government won’t just “go away” but instead turn corrupt. Call it corruption, serving the greater good, face-to-face local “tax” collection, or whatever you like, but I don’t see those in power giving it up willingly.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:10 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 5, 2017 Matte 0
daaswampman wrote:
My best advice: be something worthwhile and maintain a solid relationship with your local Sheriff! The “Wild Card” is property rights and who determines them! Deeds are likely to be as valuable as currency. Swamp

Sounds like good advice. One of the reasons I’d be cautious about buying deeded or titled property if the SHTF, it’d be very difficult to confirm the seller was the owner (or even the sole owner) of the real estate or titled property. And even if they have title and sign it over for a fair price, the seller could argue they only agreed under duress after normalcy returns, assuming all private contracts made during the event weren’t just declared null and void afterwards. I think there may be some precedance for that occurring in past disasters, but too lazy to investigate at the moment.

MrDanB wrote:
Since history repeats itself, it is wise to remember that the average Gov. Issued paper note lasts about 250 years. The debt ceiling issue is coming soon, gold and (especially) silver are heavily manipulated and many nations have been buying up metals in record quantities.
We are in a currency war right now, and currency wars always lead to real wars. During the Weimar Republic crisis, a fistful of gold would have bought an entire city block of downtown Berlin. Many currencies have failed since then. We all see what’s going on in Venezuela right now. How far do you think metals will go during a full on currency crises? In Venezuela, today, a 1/10 Oz gold eagle will more than fill a freezer with meat. We pay roughly 140ish dollars for that same coin here in the US right now. Try filling your freezer with meat for 140 bucks!
It’s all going to depend on how things play out. If it’s full on SHTF, then metals will be the last thing on my mind. But if we continue down the “slow burn” road that were on, then metals will go up in value. At some point, the manipulation of the paper value of metals will end. An excellent video explaining all of this is:
https://youtu.be/iFDe5kUUyT0

Haven’t watched the vid yet, but Venezuela is a great example of a slow motion economic/political SHTF, and not too hard to imagine something similar in store for the US at some point. Like the frog in a slowly warmed pot of water, things just steadily get a little bit worse. I wonder how many Venezuelans wished they’d have packed up and left 5 years ago, and would love to do so now but just can’t afford to? Read a news article recently that obtaining a passport and travel permission in Venezuela requires bribing gov’t bureaucrats to get approved, so leaving isn’t an option for the poorer ones (now) who burned though their savings due to inflation over the years. In prepper parlance they didn’t bugout in time, and now they’re trapped.

Speaking of SHTF bribes, thought about mentioning them in my last post but it was getting long’ish enough already. It is worthy of discussion I think. Whether it’s bribing bureaucrats for an extra ration card, paying off the police/judge for some petty infraction enforced only as a means to generate revenue for the local government, or paying protection money to some criminal organization to leave you and your family/business alone. Still using Venezuela as an example, who (and how much) do you have to pay to keep you and your family members from getting ‘drafted’ into something like this?

I can imagine a lot of situations like this in any number of different severe SHTF scenarios. Government won’t just “go away” but instead turn corrupt. Call it corruption, serving the greater good, face-to-face local “tax” collection, or whatever you like, but I don’t see those in power giving it up willingly.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:10 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 4, 2017 Matte 0
daaswampman wrote:
Your links make a wonderful argument for owning precious metals in small units! Swamp

Divisibility being one of the requirements for real money, people (and governments) have been cutting PM coins for millennia. Unlike eggs, a shotshell, or Federal Reserve Notes, dividing a PM bullion coin into pieces doesn’t destroy its value. Each piece retains its same fractional value as the whole. Fiat currency is not money, try tearing a $1 FRN in half see if you can get .50 for each piece ;)

There was a study sponsored by FEMA back in the 80’s on how barter/exchanges/markets might function following a disaster on the scale of nuclear war, “Markets, Distribution, and Exchange After Societal Cataclysm”.

Beyond just descriptions of the different types of exchanges and markets that would develop, the use of money (and where it’s used and not used) for each is discussed too. The almost interchangeable way the authors use the terms “money”, “cash”, and “currency” might frustrate any goldbugs here, but the Keynesians probably won’t even notice at all. :D

It’s a long, mostly boring, read – But my take away from it, in short, is that barter will dominate at the subsistence and peasant marketplace levels. This is “hand-to-mouth” existence level exchanges mostly, a small amount of surplus salt exchanged for a small amount of surplus fish/meat. A few rifle cartridges exchanged for shoe repair. A days worth of food for 8 hours of unskilled labor. Preppers may not need to operate in these exchanges/markets much in the early SHTF days since we’ll likely be living off stored goods or growing/producing much of them ourselves, but these will be important as the first markets that develop and form the basis for the larger ones to come. Establishing some level of trust with other buyers and sellers through these small exchanges in the early days might be beneficial later.

But the further you get away from subsistence level bartering and start dealing in larger and more diverse markets, then that’s where “money” will dominate. The study uses the term “lumpy goods” to describe these types of transactions, “lumpy” not just meaning large or bulky (like housing, or livestock), but also for things like medical care (imagine purchasing an appendectomy, where you’re trying to procure a surgeon, nurse, maybe an anesthesiologist, and all the necessary supplies – and purchase it as a single transaction). Lumpy would also include services such as transport/shipping, like hiring cowboys (Old West style) to drive those livestock you purchased to your door from 3 counties away – or contracting a rail train owner/operator with a working steam engine and a cattle car. This is where you want and need PMs, because they have always been money.

Oh, and lest anything think the study is just a politically correct and academic discussion with little real SHTF worth and skip it, things like criminal markets, militias, survivalists, warlords, and assassination services are mentioned too.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:34 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

August 4, 2017 Matte 0
daaswampman wrote:
Your links make a wonderful argument for owning precious metals in small units! Swamp

Divisibility being one of the requirements for real money, people (and governments) have been cutting PM coins for millennia. Unlike eggs, a shotshell, or Federal Reserve Notes, dividing a PM bullion coin into pieces doesn’t destroy its value. Each piece retains its same fractional value as the whole. Fiat currency is not money, try tearing a $1 FRN in half see if you can get .50 for each piece ;)

There was a study sponsored by FEMA back in the 80’s on how barter/exchanges/markets might function following a disaster on the scale of nuclear war, “Markets, Distribution, and Exchange After Societal Cataclysm”.

Beyond just descriptions of the different types of exchanges and markets that would develop, the use of money (and where it’s used and not used) for each is discussed too. The almost interchangeable way the authors use the terms “money”, “cash”, and “currency” might frustrate any goldbugs here, but the Keynesians probably won’t even notice at all. :D

It’s a long, mostly boring, read – But my take away from it, in short, is that barter will dominate at the subsistence and peasant marketplace levels. This is “hand-to-mouth” existence level exchanges mostly, a small amount of surplus salt exchanged for a small amount of surplus fish/meat. A few rifle cartridges exchanged for shoe repair. A days worth of food for 8 hours of unskilled labor. Preppers may not need to operate in these exchanges/markets much in the early SHTF days since we’ll likely be living off stored goods or growing/producing much of them ourselves, but these will be important as the first markets that develop and form the basis for the larger ones to come. Establishing some level of trust with other buyers and sellers through these small exchanges in the early days might be beneficial later.

But the further you get away from subsistence level bartering and start dealing in larger and more diverse markets, then that’s where “money” will dominate. The study uses the term “lumpy goods” to describe these types of transactions, “lumpy” not just meaning large or bulky (like housing, or livestock), but also for things like medical care (imagine purchasing an appendectomy, where you’re trying to procure a surgeon, nurse, maybe an anesthesiologist, and all the necessary supplies – and purchase it as a single transaction). Lumpy would also include services such as transport/shipping, like hiring cowboys (Old West style) to drive those livestock you purchased to your door from 3 counties away – or contracting a rail train owner/operator with a working steam engine and a cattle car. This is where you want and need PMs, because they have always been money.

Oh, and lest anything think the study is just a politically correct and academic discussion with little real SHTF worth and skip it, things like criminal markets, militias, survivalists, warlords, and assassination services are mentioned too.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:34 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 30, 2017 Matte 0

Years ago anyway, many accountants and financial planners recommended holding 5% of your net worth in PMs. I moved about 10% of mine into PMs 16 years back, and in hindsight it was a good financial decision – or has been so far anyway.

The US Dollar being the world’s reserve currency today creates demand for them which artificially increases their value. When the USD loses it’s reserve currency status those dollars will come flooding back to our country as other countries sell our dollar to buy whatever the new reserve currency is. An overabundance (supply) of US Dollars combined with less demand for them means their value will fall, that’s economics 101. From a historical perspective, the USD likely won’t remain as the reserve currency too much longer.

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Whether or not there’s a change in reserve currencies in your lifetime is anyone’s guess, but if it does happen you’ll be thankful that you bought PMs.

Gold is the standard that fiat money is compared against, I think a lot of people don’t grasp that fact. The value of gold doesn’t change, it’s the value of paper / fiat money that does. If the Fed/Treasury doubled the dollar supply tonight, gold would instantly jump to twice the current price. That doesn’t mean gold is worth more, it just means each dollar is worth less. Gold (and silver) has had roughly the same purchasing power in terms of the goods/services it will buy as it has always had for thousands of years. Sure it varies some, but over the long term it averages out. Just using very recent modern times as an example, a loaf of bread in the early 1960’s was about .22 cents, or about 2 silver dimes. Those same two 90% silver dimes today have a value of about $2.40, which is still about a loaf of bread in today’s money.

As for moving PMs, a standard 20 coin tube of 1 oz Gold Eagles weighs about 1.4 pounds and will buy a little over $25,000 USDs today.

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Not too bad in terms of weight and size, and a lot easier to carry than $25,000 worth of rice or ammo anyway. If that coin roll melts and rehardens into a golden blob in a house fire (unlikely), it’s still worth $25k in USD, minus a small assaying cost.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Jul 30, 2017 9:17 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 30, 2017 Matte 0

Years ago anyway, many accountants and financial planners recommended holding 5% of your net worth in PMs. I moved about 10% of mine into PMs 16 years back, and in hindsight it was a good financial decision – or has been so far anyway.

The US Dollar being the world’s reserve currency today creates demand for them which artificially increases their value. When the USD loses it’s reserve currency status those dollars will come flooding back to our country as other countries sell our dollar to buy whatever the new reserve currency is. An overabundance (supply) of US Dollars combined with less demand for them means their value will fall, that’s economics 101. From a historical perspective, the USD likely won’t remain as the reserve currency too much longer.

Image

Whether or not there’s a change in reserve currencies in your lifetime is anyone’s guess, but if it does happen you’ll be thankful that you bought PMs.

Gold is the standard that fiat money is compared against, I think a lot of people don’t grasp that fact. The value of gold doesn’t change, it’s the value of paper / fiat money that does. If the Fed/Treasury doubled the dollar supply tonight, gold would instantly jump to twice the current price. That doesn’t mean gold is worth more, it just means each dollar is worth less. Gold (and silver) has had roughly the same purchasing power in terms of the goods/services it will buy as it has always had for thousands of years. Sure it varies some, but over the long term it averages out. Just using very recent modern times as an example, a loaf of bread in the early 1960’s was about .22 cents, or about 2 silver dimes. Those same two 90% silver dimes today have a value of about $2.40, which is still about a loaf of bread in today’s money.

As for moving PMs, a standard 20 coin tube of 1 oz Gold Eagles weighs about 1.4 pounds and will buy a little over $25,000 USDs today.

Image

Not too bad in terms of weight and size, and a lot easier to carry than $25,000 worth of rice or ammo anyway. If that coin roll melts and rehardens into a golden blob in a house fire (unlikely), it’s still worth $25k in USD, minus a small assaying cost.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Jul 30, 2017 9:17 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 30, 2017 Matte 0

Years ago anyway, many accountants and financial planners recommended holding 5% of your net worth in PMs. I moved about 10% of mine into PMs 16 years back, and in hindsight it was a good financial decision – or has been so far anyway.

The US Dollar being the world’s reserve currency today creates demand for them which artificially increases their value. When the USD loses it’s reserve currency status those dollars will come flooding back to our country as other countries sell our dollar to buy whatever the new reserve currency is. An overabundance (supply) of US Dollars combined with less demand for them means their value will fall, that’s economics 101. From a historical perspective, the USD likely won’t remain as the reserve currency too much longer.

Image

Whether or not there’s a change in reserve currencies in your lifetime is anyone’s guess, but if it does happen you’ll be thankful that you bought PMs.

Gold is the standard that fiat money is compared against, I think a lot of people don’t grasp that fact. The value of gold doesn’t change, it’s the value of paper / fiat money that does. If the Fed/Treasury doubled the dollar supply tonight, gold would instantly jump to twice the current price. That doesn’t mean gold is worth more, it just means each dollar is worth less. Gold (and silver) has had roughly the same purchasing power in terms of the goods/services it will buy as it has always had for thousands of years. Sure it varies some, but over the long term it averages out. Just using very recent modern times as an example, a loaf of bread in the early 1960’s was about .22 cents, or about 2 silver dimes. Those same two 90% silver dimes today have a value of about $2.40, which is still about a loaf of bread in today’s money.

As for moving PMs, a standard 20 coin tube of 1 oz Gold Eagles weighs about 1.4 pounds and will buy a little over $25,000 USDs today.

Image

Not too bad in terms of weight and size, and a lot easier to carry than $25,000 worth of rice or ammo anyway. If that coin roll melts and rehardens into a golden blob in a house fire (unlikely), it’s still worth $25k in USD, minus a small assaying cost.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Jul 30, 2017 9:17 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 30, 2017 Matte 0

Years ago anyway, many accountants and financial planners recommended holding 5% of your net worth in PMs. I moved about 10% of mine into PMs 16 years back, and in hindsight it was a good financial decision – or has been so far anyway.

The US Dollar being the world’s reserve currency today creates demand for them which artificially increases their value. When the USD loses it’s reserve currency status those dollars will come flooding back to our country as other countries sell our dollar to buy whatever the new reserve currency is. An overabundance (supply) of US Dollars combined with less demand for them means their value will fall, that’s economics 101. From a historical perspective, the USD likely won’t remain as the reserve currency too much longer.

Image

Whether or not there’s a change in reserve currencies in your lifetime is anyone’s guess, but if it does happen you’ll be thankful that you bought PMs.

Gold is the standard that fiat money is compared against, I think a lot of people don’t grasp that fact. The value of gold doesn’t change, it’s the value of paper / fiat money that does. If the Fed/Treasury doubled the dollar supply tonight, gold would instantly jump to twice the current price. That doesn’t mean gold is worth more, it just means each dollar is worth less. Gold (and silver) has had roughly the same purchasing power in terms of the goods/services it will buy as it has always had for thousands of years. Sure it varies some, but over the long term it averages out. Just using very recent modern times as an example, a loaf of bread in the early 1960’s was about .22 cents, or about 2 silver dimes. Those same two 90% silver dimes today have a value of about $2.40, which is still about a loaf of bread in today’s money.

As for moving PMs, a standard 20 coin tube of 1 oz Gold Eagles weighs about 1.4 pounds and will buy a little over $25,000 USDs today.

Image

Not too bad in terms of weight and size, and a lot easier to carry than $25,000 worth of rice or ammo anyway. If that coin roll melts and rehardens into a golden blob in a house fire (unlikely), it’s still worth $25k in USD, minus a small assaying cost.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Jul 30, 2017 9:17 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: BOL vs Camping or Base

July 16, 2017 Matte 0

Just had to login and comment since this thread has two of my favorite prepper fallacies, 1) “People with money are stupid and will be the first to die”, and 2) “If the SHTF I’ll just steal what I need”.

The former often heard from posters having self-professed financial difficulties. I don’t want to pour salt on that wound, but if you’re having difficulty surviving in times of plenty then a disaster isn’t going to improve your odds. It may be fun to fantasize about those lazy, unprepared, undeserving, affluent people ending up at the bottom of the pecking order before they die of starvation because no one will take their gold or Cadillacs in exchange for a loaf of bread, but that’s not reality. The single biggest factor on who survives disasters is wealth, poor people die in much greater numbers.

On the latter, the law protects criminals as much (or more) than it protects the law abiding in civilized society. As much as I’d like to beat the living S out of shoplifters and thieves, I can’t today without likely getting arrested for assault and then sued by the perp in civil court. The law protects the criminals. It’s for this same reason I have sirens on the burglar alarms in my homes and outbuildings, because today I just want to scare off thieves – not risk a confrontation that results in injury and possible legal and financial consequences. Today I’ll just call the police and file an insurance claim if needed. In a WROL situation that changes, the sirens will be turned off so it’s just a silent alarm. I’ve given considerable thought to, and made preparations for, how to deal with looters and thieves in a SHTF/WROL environment, including how to ensure my actions appear justified (in case there might be some doubt, as mistakes could happen) once the rule of law is restored. No “shovel and shutup” here most likely, just roll the bodies up in a tarp, spray-paint “armed looter” on them, and dump them in a ditch at a nearby intersection. Should help cut down on the crime rate in our area, and if or when questioned by the authorities on what happened later, they’ll just be one story told, mine, and I have it memorized already.

On the question of BOLs, imo it’s only those that can’t afford one that don’t see the need for one. Would you want only one firearm? One vehicle? One first aid kit? Why would having one house be any different? If you’re an avid all-weather camper, then OK. Have a cousin like that, he doesn’t self-identify as a prepper (self-identifying being the only requirement to be a “prepper” I guess), but spends at least a week each year tent camping in a national forest while deer hunting in northern Michigan in November. People with that kind of experience might pull it off, the risk of failure and death (or just a very miserable existence) seems pretty high otherwise.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:02 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Camp Perimeter Defenses

June 27, 2017 Matte 0

Decided to beat the rush and headed for the hills a decade ago. If we had to bugout deeper, or back to the The City, the major pieces of our bugout perimeter security kit.

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Dakota Alerts, HTs, a combo motion sensor and contact (door/window/tripwire) switch alarm, monofilament line, and eye bolts. Dogs not shown. Picked up a 6-pack of those motion sensor/contact alarms cheap pre-Y2k, they’re pretty versatile but not really weather resistant. The Dakota Alerts with the stock antennas have a range of about 3/4 of a mile to a HT on flat ground through the woods, handy for monitoring a trail or the approach to your camp, or for hunting.

Slaves? lol

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Tue Jun 27, 2017 8:38 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Camp Perimeter Defenses

June 27, 2017 Matte 0

Decided to beat the rush and headed for the hills a decade ago. If we had to bugout deeper, or back to the The City, the major pieces of our bugout perimeter security kit.

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Dakota Alerts, HTs, a combo motion sensor and contact (door/window/tripwire) switch alarm, monofilament line, and eye bolts. Dogs not shown. Picked up a 6-pack of those motion sensor/contact alarms cheap pre-Y2k, they’re pretty versatile but not really weather resistant. The Dakota Alerts with the stock antennas have a range of about 3/4 of a mile to a HT on flat ground through the woods, handy for monitoring a trail or the approach to your camp, or for hunting.

Slaves? lol

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Tue Jun 27, 2017 8:38 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 9, 2017 Matte 0

My home is tan. :)

Since you post your identity in your signature I spent a couple minutes looking at your locale, area demographics, and home details. Our situations could hardly be more opposite. Like Gunns, my home stands out although you have to view it from satellite images since it’s not visible from the road (or even from my gate). You’re in a metro area of over 2 million people, my home is over 150 miles away from a city that large. Your population density is about 1,300 per sq mile, my county has less than 20 per sq mile and I know for a fact there’s only 4 people in the sq mile around us. You have a 1/3 acre lot in a subdivision about 50′ from the road, we have 10 acres (two acres fenced/gated) and bordered by public land on three sides with a 200 yard driveway. Not to suggest either situation is better in all scenarios, just highlighting the differences and why “the gray home” isn’t always the right answer.

I suppose what I really don’t get however, particularly in regards to this post, is why you tell everyone who you are, where you live, details of your preparedness situation, what your plans are, and sometimes even when you’ll be away from home – but also that you want to go unnoticed as the gray man living in the gray house. Not trying to argue or insult, just seems to me you give out way too much information publicly if that’s your plan. You’ve left an online trail of bread loaves leading right to your door :lol: Preppers usually have an abundance of nice firearms and cash/PMs stashed away at least, and from your latest “Who will be your Doctor” post it’s not hard to guess you probably have a nice assortment of prescription drugs too, right? Aren’t you at least concerned someone might use this information to plan a burglary (or worse) of your home now?

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Fri Jun 09, 2017 7:49 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: They know Who You Are

May 20, 2017 Matte 0

The lists are built as needed. Data from myriad sources can be queried to look for individuals that match the particular profile being searched for, even trying to predict future behavior based on past behavior.

Companies do it all the time to target their advertising. Government for other reasons, such as police depts to build criminal watch lists (ex. http://chicago.suntimes.com/politics/wh … watchdogs/)

The FCC license database is just another data source. An amateur radio license by itself is just a single data point, but add “Costco membership” + “NICS firearm check in the last two years” + “TEOTWAWKI related books in Amazon wishlist” and maybe you’d end up on a likely prepper list if they wanted to build one. Forum membership and what you like/follow on social media being other data sources. That my name might show up on a gov’t list of “preppers, >90% confidence” doesn’t bother me personally, that I’d be targeted by the gov’t based on matching that profile seems pretty unlikely. That said, I chose not to have a ham license because I prefer not to have my home and BOL on someone’s list of “fixed, private radio transmitter sites”. Remember it’s not just our gov’t that builds lists, foreign gov’ts and individuals can ‘mine’ the available data as well. If you wanted to build a list of likely preppers in your area then searching the FCC database for licensees in your zip code might be a good place to start for example. I’m more concerned with nearby neighbors associating me with preppers than the gov’t personally.

To each his own. I’d just suggest caution if you want to make your identity and location known in a public forum; stating you own firearms, gold/silver, and will be away from home on the weekend of June 16th (A.N.T.S. camp) might be interesting to someone.

Statistics: Posted by Matte — Sat May 20, 2017 6:03 am