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Nebraska Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Prepping Fatigue?

September 26, 2017 kappydell 0

Us real preppers never stop; we incorporate it into our lifestyle. I must admit though, I do get tired of the constant sales pitches to try to sell prepper ‘stuff’ instead of the how-to info I used to see so much more of. Oh well.
I keep preppin’ regardless. There is ALWAYS something that occurs where prepping is a godsend – it does not have to be a cataclysm, a simple family emergency is enough. My prep have carried me comfortably through sudden job losses, catastrophic illnesses, huge storms causing 6 wks without electricity, and have also been a source of care packages to friends in need. So ‘keep calm & prep on” has been a way of life for decades now. Real preppers don’t need an ‘excuse’ to prep….life itself is reason enough!

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:01 am


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Introduce Yourself • Re: New but slowly making progress

September 21, 2017 kappydell 0

All good ideas mentioned here. As a long time prepper, most of my preps are/were put by on a low budget. Aldi’s has the best retail prices I’ve seen, Sams club can vary – around here it is expensive. As a retired person with more time than money, perhaps you can use some of my research ‘finds’….
1. Feed stores can be cheap sources of bulk grains, but you will have to put them into mylar or other storage on your own. You also need to make sure you purchase plain, untinkered with grain. But since the day a feed store employee told me he fed his own family from the feed store wheat & corn, I am comfortable with it. It hard to argue with being able to store whole dried field corn (for hominy, cornmeal, grits, etc) for the price of $12 for 50 lbs. Whole kernels of corn are superior anyway, as the natural oils in corn start turning rancid right after grinding.
I’ve also found red wheat in 50 lb sacks for a similar price. Very basic, but very cheap.
2. Check ethnic stores – you can often find terrific deals on rice and dried beans in a Mexican store, or an Indian store. Korean stores sometimes sell acorn flour (if you want to see how acorn meal would taste – might be nice to know if acorns are a potential resource). Canned goods from other countries often include foods you cant easily find canned in the US, but watch the prices.
3. Dented can places. I was lucky to find a canning company that sold dented cans (after they inspected them to make sure the seals were not affected) for $6 a case. Selection was whatever they had on hand, but generally I could get corn, green beans, beets & canned potatoes every time; other times I would find peas (I always grabbed those, they disappeared quickly), spinach, carrots, kraut, mixed vegetables and sometimes pickled beets or applesauce (in cases of glass jars). This place has a good turnover, as folks from several counties around would come to buy and their #10 cans ($1 apiece) were particularly popular with charity food kitchens, the VFW, and nursing homes. Its worth checking to see if there is such a place near you…I plan on returning annually (when I go to fish for Salmon) to stock up. Such a place is worth the search for it and imho will be worth the 480 mile drive to get to it annually after I move (unless I can find one closer).
4. Prep KNOWLEDGE, not stuff. Stuff can be taken/confiscated/stolen, get lost, break, and otherwise fail. Know-how (how to make a rocket stove from bricks lying around after a tornado hits, for example) can not be taken away from you and allows better improvisation to fit changing situations. The library is free; I used the free internet there for many years, downloading and taking notes, or putting on personal disks (and later thumb drives) until I could learn it, or print it out. Best though, is to try these new things out, learning as you go.
5. Learn to store and put up your own foods. A dehydrator is a good buy (often around Christmas) and you can easily dehydrated frozen veggies (no need to blanch, it is already done) easily, until you find alternate bulk food sources. 16 cups of frozen corn dries down to around 5 cups of dried corn – if your family likes corn, it is one of the most popular dried veggies, as it rehydrates well & with a good flavor & texture. You can also dry applesauce (on the little trays, or line your screen with plastic wrap) for home made fruit roll ups. Lots of fun, easy to do, takes only a little power. Canning is not all that hard, and canned foods are familiar comfort foods in a crisis. The canners can get expensive tho, so if you have an older relative with a canner, ask to borrow it (and maybe for lessons). Thrift shops in areas transitioning from rural to urban, or mixed areas often have canners available cheap. I got my first three canners for $10 each.

Yes, it can take a while, and in light of todays situations, I’d try to learn as much as possible of critical skills – what forage foods are in your particular area/neighborhood & how to cook them, how to make a shelter and a fire for starters. How to live reasonably well without power or help. A little networking is free. You are waaaay ahead of most folks in that you are aware of the need, and actively doing something. So congratulations, and keep up the good work.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:10 pm


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Trapping • Re: Trapping racoons

August 24, 2017 kappydell 0

We had a family of raccoons move into our attic while we were down South one winter. Marshmallows, two Havahart traps, and a .22 to the CPU took care of the issue. In our neighborhood, folks always shoot off fireworks, if anybody heard, I suspect that is what they thought the bangs were. Good fertilizer. But yes, laws vary, and although we loaned a trap to a neighbor who had problems, we declined removing them for him, as nuisance trappers we had the licenses (still do) but are required to relocate the animals; a silly requirement because who in their right mind wants someone else’s varmint? But its required of commercial nuisance trappers in my area. So we stayed ‘amateurs’…..

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:44 am


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Trapping • Re: Trapping racoons

August 24, 2017 kappydell 0

We had a family of raccoons move into our attic while we were down South one winter. Marshmallows, two Havahart traps, and a .22 to the CPU took care of the issue. In our neighborhood, folks always shoot off fireworks, if anybody heard, I suspect that is what they thought the bangs were. Good fertilizer. But yes, laws vary, and although we loaned a trap to a neighbor who had problems, we declined removing them for him, as nuisance trappers we had the licenses (still do) but are required to relocate the animals; a silly requirement because who in their right mind wants someone else’s varmint? But its required of commercial nuisance trappers in my area. So we stayed ‘amateurs’…..

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:44 am


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Canning • Re: Strange canning question

August 24, 2017 kappydell 0

powders can clog the vac sealer. rather than mess around with trying to seal with a coffee filter over the intake tube, I simply toss an oxygen absorber in each mini-pail (2 gal size, from the local convenience store) lined with mylar bag and seal up an assortment of seasonings in one pail.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:32 am


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Canning • Re: Strange canning question

August 24, 2017 kappydell 0

powders can clog the vac sealer. rather than mess around with trying to seal with a coffee filter over the intake tube, I simply toss an oxygen absorber in each mini-pail (2 gal size, from the local convenience store) lined with mylar bag and seal up an assortment of seasonings in one pail.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Thu Aug 24, 2017 2:32 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 29, 2017 kappydell 0

If things get that ugly, I do not rule out barricading the window; but I will be doing it with plywood, and complaining loudly to anyone who will listen that ‘someone’ broke it. Lets face it, anyone left in the area will be doing the same, so barricades would become ‘the new gray’ so to speak. (I would put in one of those screw in one-way viewers so I could look out, though…)

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Thu Jun 29, 2017 4:49 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #3 (JUNE 2017)

June 28, 2017 kappydell 0

I was amused to see the shocked look on the face of Ticker Carlson on Fox News when a guest speaker explained to him how disastrous a successful EMP attack would be. I guess he never heard about EMPs before, but his response was priceless….together with the shocked look, he said ‘you’re tempting me to buy a years’ supply of freeze dried foods during the next break’.
One of their sponsors is WiseFoods, a dehydrated food seller. Maybe he could finagle a price break for that blurted out comment.

Seriously folks, all my preps, including skill sets for years have been for non-electric, no-utilities, no infrastructure living. Not only can nobody take know-how from you, once you learn to think outside the box, you can adapt and prep for whatever occurs, even an EMP. My faraday boxes are very small, a couple of walkies & solar charging stuff is enough for me.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Jun 27, 2017 11:41 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Cooking in a Grid Down Event

June 28, 2017 kappydell 0

true, after propane is gone a Dakota fire hole or a rocket stove should work to heat up the thermal cooker pot just fine. Ive noticed that cooking odor gets stronger as the food gets closer to being ‘done’ so the wrap should help mimize that part. As far as smoke, like I said, the Dakota fire hole; or build a very small fire in a rocket stove under an overhanging tree (to scatter the smoke).

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Jun 27, 2017 11:20 pm


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Support • Re: Logging in

June 28, 2017 kappydell 0
msdeltamom wrote:
A week or so ago I kept having to request password recovery, even though I’ve used the same password here for years. It wouldn’t even accept the password recovery code sent to me at times. I’m logged in now, so hope to stay that way for awhile.

Me too; plus it wont let me reset my password claiming the password they sent me that I activated is incorrect. Methinks something is amiss. I’ll have to request a new password every time I sign on now, I guess. Whatta pain.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Jun 27, 2017 11:16 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: OK: lets Talk About the Nasty Stuff-Hygiene

June 27, 2017 kappydell 0

Hygiene is one of the most critical jobs in camp. The military has an excellent selection of improvised and more advanced camp ‘conveniences’ if you need ideas. Id utilize the techniques I learned from scout and family camping trips.

The camp cook keeps a pail of boiling water on the fire at all times (at least steaming hot) for folks to use for washing everything from hands to dishes (remove the water required into another container, and the user refills the boiler from the extra pail alongside). The cooks assistant helps keep those water pails full, as well as keeping the cook supplied with cooking water.

Tippy-taps (made from re-cycled bleach or milk bottles) are set up for hand washing stations wherever hands might be dirtied. Bodily bathing is via the old washcloth and container of water (steel pot) technique. Military females will LOL but the TPP bath and its male version will getcha thru until you can get solar or non solar gravity showers going.

Dishes are washed in a multiple station set up – one pail to scrape off solids to feed the dogs; one pail cold water for initial wash up, the next pail hot water with soap tp wash, another for clean water rinse, then into mesh bags for dunking in the boiling water pail for 10 seconds to kill any bacteria. Then over to a nearby clothesline to hang the bags for air drying (which will not take long from the extremely hot water). Each person can do their personal mess kit this way, and the cook & assistant do the cooking vessels. At the end, the hot soapy wash water can be used if desired to scrub latrine seats at least once a day.)

Sleeping bags are turned inside out and hung over the clotheslines daily, immediately upon waking. The UV light in sunshine kills many germs.

The bucket and plunger method is used for clothing; depending on manpower each can do their own, or an assigned person can do it (preferably several people, it is more strenuous than it looks). A scrubbing board will work if you do not want to use the plunger to clean clothes, but it, too is strenuous. It replaces beating on the rocks, and is less hard on the clothing. Agitation helps loosen soil for better results with less soap.

Under clothes (next to the skin) should be of a boil-able fabric (cotton that is pre-shrunk, for example) so it can be boiled for hygiene reasons. Remove from the boiling kettle with ye old stick, and hang on bushes or clothes line to dry in the sun. The boiling kills germs and is critical, especially if there is any sickness in camp. Towels and wash cloths and dish clothes also should be boiled & hung, not to mention handkerchiefs & head scarves/bandannas.

Water treatment is another aspect of camp hygiene; in a base camp you can have an assigned person to maintain adequate supplies of potable water. SODIS is one way of treating water, but takes time and attention to do. Boiling is the fastest way to create large amounts of safe water. (I’d save the chemical disinfection for on-the-move operations, and I use an iodine bottle (polar pure) followed with a pinch of ascorbic acid to take out the iodine taste. Its easy and compact to carry, and you can purify water in a canteen as you travel.) The assigned water person would also be able to help keep enough water on hand for cleaning & bathing.

Latrines are easy to make, but need to be an adequate distance from camp for health concerns. If someone can’t make the latrine, commodes (aka ‘thunder mugs’) can be used, but will require frequent emptying and rinsing out, with a daily scalding with boiling water all over, including the seat area to avoid germ transference. Hopefully the person can do it themselves, but if infirm, a personal aid will have to help.

I think I covered the high (if you can call them that) points. Hesperian Press puts out a booklet on water & sanitation which give excellent directions for making and caring for latrines and body wastes, including directions on making fertilizer from urine. I recommend their booklet, as well as the Humanure book which describes making a sawdust latrine for safe composting of human wastes. It’s gotta go somewhere!

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jun 26, 2017 10:08 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Camp Perimeter Defenses

June 27, 2017 kappydell 0

I have an assortment of tripwire activated devices. Some are audio, some are pyrotechnic, some just flash a light. Setup depends on situation, but all are small and portable. And not all are battery or electric dependent, either, some are mechanical. Add in some good dogs and motivated sentries to check on perimeter disturbances. No such thing as innocent if I have to put out perimeter alarms….anybody trips one and does not want to be detained they can always run (I ain’t back-shootin’…that’s murder.)
Anybody WANTS to talk or parley they can do the old fashioned walk and hail method. For those that have never seen a western it is simple. Walk up toward the camp while yelling ‘Hail, the camp!” That will alert us that you are not being sneaky/suspicious and we would send someone out to talk, under watchful eyes, of course.
Old fashioned, but workable.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jun 26, 2017 9:04 pm


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Gardening • Re: “Mittleider Method” Anyone doing this?Is it really worth

June 27, 2017 kappydell 0

Looks like a way to use a surfeit of sawdust, and I don’t have that issue. Anything requiring that much amendment and tinkering is too complicated for me to depend on it. I’ll stick to dirt & compost, thank you. It never ceases to amaze me though, the new techniques someone dreams up. I always wonder how much money they make off that stuff. But then again I am a life long cynic.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jun 26, 2017 8:54 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 25, 2017 kappydell 0
Cadit wrote:
Thank all of you for posting, some really great advice for those not in the know. And its all about blending in and not drawing attention to yourself. And that has come across very effectively. And Kappydell; if you have that presentation on file, I would like a copy to present it to my group if you don’t mind sharing. It sounds like a good presentation. Of course I’ll give you credit for its creation.

Thanks again for all the input, and ideas presented. 8)

I’ll see if its one I kept

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 25, 2017 4:24 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: Cooking in a Grid Down Event

June 25, 2017 kappydell 0

propane to boil up my covered pots of food for 10 min or so, then into a thermal wrap to finish cooking. saves fuel plus masks odors, no smoke, it works well with dehydrated and common storage foods. no burning the food, and doesn’t require tending in case you have other more critical stuff to attend to.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 25, 2017 4:17 am


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Solar • Re: Solar LED lights and chargers

June 25, 2017 kappydell 0

those solar shed lights from harbor freight are excellent – menards also carries them . harbor freight also carries a lantern type solar lamp for those that want a hand carried version. I buy them every time I see them. cheap, effective, and a swell gift cant have too many…at least 1 per room/workspace/person

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 25, 2017 4:07 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: What Do You Expect To Achieve in a GDS

June 15, 2017 kappydell 0

I hope, Cadit, you don’t think I am against a group; I certainly am not. I’m saying that the time to network is BEFORE things hit the fan. Know your neighbors, for example; join a prep group and network within it with other preppers. A prep group I belong to had quite a few newbies, who were all panicked about “I don’t have anybody to team up with!” but after some of us more experienced folks talked to them a bit, we were able to explain that was one reason our prep group formed: for mutual learning, networking, and just plain fun. They calmed down a bit then, and kept coming and doing just that, networking.

Networking naturally leads to forming a mutual interests group, and if things get knarly, networks pass the word, and their members tend to team up and work together. But you have to start ahead of a crises, allowing everyone time to get used to each other and build up trust in one another and clarify mutual goals and activities (who will do what), build teams and generally work together. Much better than doing it under the pressure of an emergency.

If you are not used to networking, it is a skill that is learnable. In ‘olden times’ it was called ‘being friendly/neighborly’ and it was considered a goal for those who wished to live among others to be good at it. However in today’s ego-driven society it is certainly not as common as it once was, and you might have to work harder to learn how to do it. Then incorporate into your lifestyle as a matter of course.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:53 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: What Do You Expect To Achieve in a GDS

June 15, 2017 kappydell 0

I hope, Cadit, you don’t think I am against a group; I certainly am not. I’m saying that the time to network is BEFORE things hit the fan. Know your neighbors, for example; join a prep group and network within it with other preppers. A prep group I belong to had quite a few newbies, who were all panicked about “I don’t have anybody to team up with!” but after some of us more experienced folks talked to them a bit, we were able to explain that was one reason our prep group formed: for mutual learning, networking, and just plain fun. They calmed down a bit then, and kept coming and doing just that, networking.

Networking naturally leads to forming a mutual interests group, and if things get knarly, networks pass the word, and their members tend to team up and work together. But you have to start ahead of a crises, allowing everyone time to get used to each other and build up trust in one another and clarify mutual goals and activities (who will do what), build teams and generally work together. Much better than doing it under the pressure of an emergency.

If you are not used to networking, it is a skill that is learnable. In ‘olden times’ it was called ‘being friendly/neighborly’ and it was considered a goal for those who wished to live among others to be good at it. However in today’s ego-driven society it is certainly not as common as it once was, and you might have to work harder to learn how to do it. Then incorporate into your lifestyle as a matter of course.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:53 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: my own update

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0

I agree, and always do prep hard. However I have been seeing glimmers of hope lately – an increasing disaffection for shenanigans and a surreptitious rolling of the eyes when Ms. You-Know-Who starts her litany of ‘those who done me wrong’. I think people in general are starting to see through the façade. I just hope it is soon enough and that they will take action to break this cycle of increasing lawlessness we seem to be getting into. We still are a nation of laws – not whims – LAWS – which is largely responsible for our relative stability and draws immigrants looking for a peaceful and productive life.

Yet a major event is possible. The courts keep affirming more and more outrageous actions as ‘freedom of speech’ and that does nothing to discourage destructive tantrums that become more and more ‘extreme’ to get our attention. The cycle needs to be broken – I for one do not want to hear a frightened whine of “I didn’t MEAN to….” from someone who has triggered a disaster while having a hissy fit.

The dems have been hijacked by ‘hard’ socialists who do not mind getting down & dirty & illegal & create anarchy to take over. Inciting bloodshed and terroristic acts in their ‘useful idiots’ is a favored technique for keeping their own hands (seemingly) clean. Too bad they purge those ‘useful idiots’ when they change regimes; their idiots do not seem to notice that part!)

I just keep on prepping – hard – and staying informed so I can discern BS from truth in life, and at the ballot box.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jun 12, 2017 11:24 am


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General Food Topics • Re: my own update

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0

I agree, and always do prep hard. However I have been seeing glimmers of hope lately – an increasing disaffection for shenanigans and a surreptitious rolling of the eyes when Ms. You-Know-Who starts her litany of ‘those who done me wrong’. I think people in general are starting to see through the façade. I just hope it is soon enough and that they will take action to break this cycle of increasing lawlessness we seem to be getting into. We still are a nation of laws – not whims – LAWS – which is largely responsible for our relative stability and draws immigrants looking for a peaceful and productive life.

Yet a major event is possible. The courts keep affirming more and more outrageous actions as ‘freedom of speech’ and that does nothing to discourage destructive tantrums that become more and more ‘extreme’ to get our attention. The cycle needs to be broken – I for one do not want to hear a frightened whine of “I didn’t MEAN to….” from someone who has triggered a disaster while having a hissy fit.

The dems have been hijacked by ‘hard’ socialists who do not mind getting down & dirty & illegal & create anarchy to take over. Inciting bloodshed and terroristic acts in their ‘useful idiots’ is a favored technique for keeping their own hands (seemingly) clean. Too bad they purge those ‘useful idiots’ when they change regimes; their idiots do not seem to notice that part!)

I just keep on prepping – hard – and staying informed so I can discern BS from truth in life, and at the ballot box.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jun 12, 2017 11:24 am


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General Food Topics • Re: my own update

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0

I agree, and always do prep hard. However I have been seeing glimmers of hope lately – an increasing disaffection for shenanigans and a surreptitious rolling of the eyes when Ms. You-Know-Who starts her litany of ‘those who done me wrong’. I think people in general are starting to see through the façade. I just hope it is soon enough and that they will take action to break this cycle of increasing lawlessness we seem to be getting into. We still are a nation of laws – not whims – LAWS – which is largely responsible for our relative stability and draws immigrants looking for a peaceful and productive life.

Yet a major event is possible. The courts keep affirming more and more outrageous actions as ‘freedom of speech’ and that does nothing to discourage destructive tantrums that become more and more ‘extreme’ to get our attention. The cycle needs to be broken – I for one do not want to hear a frightened whine of “I didn’t MEAN to….” from someone who has triggered a disaster while having a hissy fit.

The dems have been hijacked by ‘hard’ socialists who do not mind getting down & dirty & illegal & create anarchy to take over. Inciting bloodshed and terroristic acts in their ‘useful idiots’ is a favored technique for keeping their own hands (seemingly) clean. Too bad they purge those ‘useful idiots’ when they change regimes; their idiots do not seem to notice that part!)

I just keep on prepping – hard – and staying informed so I can discern BS from truth in life, and at the ballot box.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Mon Jun 12, 2017 11:24 am


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A.N.T.S. • Re: What Do You Expect To Achieve in a GDS

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0
daaswampman wrote:
If it happens and I pray it doesn’t, I believe communities of self reliant people will eventually form – just like communities have developed throughout human history! Groups without religious dogma as its core, will fail – just like they have throughout human history!

All these Prepper Groups will suffer the same fates as the communes of the sixties! Been there and done that one! My greatest concern for the Prepper Groups, they will be heavily armed when the fighting starts!

And contrary to popular belief, most of the fighting was not over tangible things, it was over who was doing who! Too much time together and nobody is getting enough! If you have children, I suggest you watch them. Swamp

I remember those days too. Never underestimate the “lowest common denominator” I human nature before you sign up to join a large group. Many hands make light work, but they can also make much MISCHIEF. Vet who you reveal to verrrrrrry carefully, and always leave yourself a back door in case you need to make a hasty exit. If that makes you a curmudgeon, so be it.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:26 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: What Do You Expect To Achieve in a GDS

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0
daaswampman wrote:
If it happens and I pray it doesn’t, I believe communities of self reliant people will eventually form – just like communities have developed throughout human history! Groups without religious dogma as its core, will fail – just like they have throughout human history!

All these Prepper Groups will suffer the same fates as the communes of the sixties! Been there and done that one! My greatest concern for the Prepper Groups, they will be heavily armed when the fighting starts!

And contrary to popular belief, most of the fighting was not over tangible things, it was over who was doing who! Too much time together and nobody is getting enough! If you have children, I suggest you watch them. Swamp

I remember those days too. Never underestimate the “lowest common denominator” I human nature before you sign up to join a large group. Many hands make light work, but they can also make much MISCHIEF. Vet who you reveal to verrrrrrry carefully, and always leave yourself a back door in case you need to make a hasty exit. If that makes you a curmudgeon, so be it.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:26 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0

Thank you Swampie, I’ve noticed the same thing.

I learned grayness growing up Republican during the Vietnam War Protest era in a very liberal town. I remember the more extreme self-proclaimed ‘liberals’ trying to ruin peoples lives because they did not agree with their politics – getting people fired from their jobs, thrown out from their apartments, wrecking their cars (the poor man’s revenge) and the like. Nowdays they are a little more in your face, but seem to remain just as treacherous. I expect being gray to become a more critical part of opsec in the coming days.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 12, 2017 kappydell 0

Thank you Swampie, I’ve noticed the same thing.

I learned grayness growing up Republican during the Vietnam War Protest era in a very liberal town. I remember the more extreme self-proclaimed ‘liberals’ trying to ruin peoples lives because they did not agree with their politics – getting people fired from their jobs, thrown out from their apartments, wrecking their cars (the poor man’s revenge) and the like. Nowdays they are a little more in your face, but seem to remain just as treacherous. I expect being gray to become a more critical part of opsec in the coming days.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 11:06 pm


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A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 11, 2017 kappydell 0

I did a presentation on going gray for my prepper group and to sum things up, you blend in.

You keep your eyes open, ears open, and mouth shut. You don’t advertise your stuff – or leave it where others can see it. You do not talk politics or religion with neighbors (giving them a grudge or a reason to remember you out of many other strangers, or interesting them in a sudden visit). You talk about local sports and the weather instead – innocuous subjects. You don’t wear camo, you wear work clothes (if that is what everyone else wears around you). You drive a similar car to everyone elses (that was hard for many of the men to accept, they liked their personal vehicles). You don’t ‘open carry’ . Concealed is OK, but it is strictly don’t ask, don’t tell. (Why give a predator pre-knowledge of your ability to defend?)

You watch what you tell people – disinformation can be a friend, but keep it to a minimum or you will get mixed up. Better just give the impression of being the quiet type.
Cultivate the neighborhood snoopy-pants. They will be able to tell you about the neighbors, their friends, strangers, wildlife in the ‘hood, etc. If you can do it, a little dis-information can be put into play – just tell them it is a secret, and it will invariably get broadcast. So make sure it is what you want people to think, ie, you too think the way that everyone else does. So utilize that nosy snoop for intelligence. Be discreet, but make friends (sort of) with them. If you squirm at disinformation, just be a great listener. Spy agencies collect data that way, so can you.

Start networking now with your neighbors – discreetly, of course, talking sports and the like, so you can get a feel for how they might handle a critical situation. Several of my neighbors are preppers, though nobody has openly discussed it. They are self reliant, and in a crunch we will team up; we all know that instinctively, and have an unspoken agreement on it born from borrowing each others power tools, and swapping veggies and canning recipes over the back fence. We have given out firewood, they have helped us split wood when we get a new load in. The one legged Viet Vet, the construction worker, the do-it-yourselfer who is a hunter, and the motorcycle mechanic down the block we all know, and have learned enough about to network with them. The ultra liberal elderly lady across the street – no, we will help her get to her family, but not depend on her one whit. Ditto the harried family man next door who is always too tired from work, or when he is laid off too tired from smoking weed, to help his wife with the upkeep of their home. We will help him and his children sign up for help from FEMA (he does not know where to go, while we have researched it for him). But depend on him? Noooooo. Let him in out home? Noooooo. Give him anything? Hell, Nooooooo.

Depending on circumstances you might need to be gray around your whole family, especially when your children are too young to know about opsec. Show and Tell at school does not need to know about Daddy’s (or Mommy’s) new gun and how they carry it everywhere (it tends to freak out the teachers anyway); nor about the full store room. If you decorate in ‘colonial’ or ‘historical’ style, it is easier to have such things as hand tools and non-electric appliances on hand. Just tell people you are ‘old school’ or if you want, that you are ‘trying to lessen my carbon footprint’ (LOL). Treat such things matter of factly, without fanfare (if you cant keep it secret) and hopefully the little shavers will just assume it is nothing unusual or interesting enough to bring up to anyone else, until they are old enough to understand not talking about some things to their peers. Camping is a good socially acceptable way to practice your self reliance skills. If you have a nosy neighbor who sees you practicing pitching a tent or some such in the back yard, it is ‘advertised’ as family togetherness, not something out of the ordinary. Ditto visiting historical sites and tours to see how things were done in the eras before electricity. History buffs tend to be thought of as faceless geeks, while preppers are looked upon as lunatics with cool stuff you want to take.

Clothing, even in a crisis should NOT be military or hunting camo, it stands out. Work clothes, preferably broken in, in gray, beige or denim; a bike helmet, NOT a military style one (sorry folks, I like that stuff too). Work boots, not military ones. A common backpack in a neutral color, not a LL Bean (pricey, makes you a target) or a military (makes you a militia suspect) one. You don’t want to stand out at all.

So, to sum up about going gray: look, act, talk, dress the same as the neighbors; keep display items that are flashy or more expensive strictly out of sight. Keep your yard up more or less the same way; drive a similar car. No obvious stuff that most neighbors don’t already have. No gorgeous slate shingles if everybody else has asphalt ones. No boat worthy of a drug smuggler when everyone else has a bass boat. Leave the HumVee in the garage and drive the used pickup truck around town. The life of the party, the neighborhood block party guy, is NOT who you want to be in a crises. You don’t even want your name being associated with charity events – donate anonymously. You want to be nobody special. You want to blend is so well that when your name is mentioned, people’s first reaction is “Who? Never noticed them. ” Its safer that way. That is what living gray is to me.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 5:45 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: The Gray House

June 11, 2017 kappydell 0

I did a presentation on going gray for my prepper group and to sum things up, you blend in.

You keep your eyes open, ears open, and mouth shut. You don’t advertise your stuff – or leave it where others can see it. You do not talk politics or religion with neighbors (giving them a grudge or a reason to remember you out of many other strangers, or interesting them in a sudden visit). You talk about local sports and the weather instead – innocuous subjects. You don’t wear camo, you wear work clothes (if that is what everyone else wears around you). You drive a similar car to everyone elses (that was hard for many of the men to accept, they liked their personal vehicles). You don’t ‘open carry’ . Concealed is OK, but it is strictly don’t ask, don’t tell. (Why give a predator pre-knowledge of your ability to defend?)

You watch what you tell people – disinformation can be a friend, but keep it to a minimum or you will get mixed up. Better just give the impression of being the quiet type.
Cultivate the neighborhood snoopy-pants. They will be able to tell you about the neighbors, their friends, strangers, wildlife in the ‘hood, etc. If you can do it, a little dis-information can be put into play – just tell them it is a secret, and it will invariably get broadcast. So make sure it is what you want people to think, ie, you too think the way that everyone else does. So utilize that nosy snoop for intelligence. Be discreet, but make friends (sort of) with them. If you squirm at disinformation, just be a great listener. Spy agencies collect data that way, so can you.

Start networking now with your neighbors – discreetly, of course, talking sports and the like, so you can get a feel for how they might handle a critical situation. Several of my neighbors are preppers, though nobody has openly discussed it. They are self reliant, and in a crunch we will team up; we all know that instinctively, and have an unspoken agreement on it born from borrowing each others power tools, and swapping veggies and canning recipes over the back fence. We have given out firewood, they have helped us split wood when we get a new load in. The one legged Viet Vet, the construction worker, the do-it-yourselfer who is a hunter, and the motorcycle mechanic down the block we all know, and have learned enough about to network with them. The ultra liberal elderly lady across the street – no, we will help her get to her family, but not depend on her one whit. Ditto the harried family man next door who is always too tired from work, or when he is laid off too tired from smoking weed, to help his wife with the upkeep of their home. We will help him and his children sign up for help from FEMA (he does not know where to go, while we have researched it for him). But depend on him? Noooooo. Let him in out home? Noooooo. Give him anything? Hell, Nooooooo.

Depending on circumstances you might need to be gray around your whole family, especially when your children are too young to know about opsec. Show and Tell at school does not need to know about Daddy’s (or Mommy’s) new gun and how they carry it everywhere (it tends to freak out the teachers anyway); nor about the full store room. If you decorate in ‘colonial’ or ‘historical’ style, it is easier to have such things as hand tools and non-electric appliances on hand. Just tell people you are ‘old school’ or if you want, that you are ‘trying to lessen my carbon footprint’ (LOL). Treat such things matter of factly, without fanfare (if you cant keep it secret) and hopefully the little shavers will just assume it is nothing unusual or interesting enough to bring up to anyone else, until they are old enough to understand not talking about some things to their peers. Camping is a good socially acceptable way to practice your self reliance skills. If you have a nosy neighbor who sees you practicing pitching a tent or some such in the back yard, it is ‘advertised’ as family togetherness, not something out of the ordinary. Ditto visiting historical sites and tours to see how things were done in the eras before electricity. History buffs tend to be thought of as faceless geeks, while preppers are looked upon as lunatics with cool stuff you want to take.

Clothing, even in a crisis should NOT be military or hunting camo, it stands out. Work clothes, preferably broken in, in gray, beige or denim; a bike helmet, NOT a military style one (sorry folks, I like that stuff too). Work boots, not military ones. A common backpack in a neutral color, not a LL Bean (pricey, makes you a target) or a military (makes you a militia suspect) one. You don’t want to stand out at all.

So, to sum up about going gray: look, act, talk, dress the same as the neighbors; keep display items that are flashy or more expensive strictly out of sight. Keep your yard up more or less the same way; drive a similar car. No obvious stuff that most neighbors don’t already have. No gorgeous slate shingles if everybody else has asphalt ones. No boat worthy of a drug smuggler when everyone else has a bass boat. Leave the HumVee in the garage and drive the used pickup truck around town. The life of the party, the neighborhood block party guy, is NOT who you want to be in a crises. You don’t even want your name being associated with charity events – donate anonymously. You want to be nobody special. You want to blend is so well that when your name is mentioned, people’s first reaction is “Who? Never noticed them. ” Its safer that way. That is what living gray is to me.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 5:45 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Bicycles; are they worth the Investment

June 11, 2017 kappydell 0

The deer hauler works great – made for off roading. I bought one when my husband became disabled. He was worried a bout having to go cross country in a wheel chair. We set it up so he would ride on the cart with some gear, and would cover our backside while I pulled it via a harness from the front. We could both easily access firearms if needed that way.
A little physical, but it worked. He also liked his adult trike, with a good size basket on the back. It would haul two 5 gal buckets of water at a time, and folded to fit in the van, so we would be able to use it if roads got blocked. I still have that trike, its quite comfortable and very stable.
I have seem several takes on the tactical bicycle – panniers over the back tires, luggage racks front and back with either a flat platform for lashing things on, or in one case a ‘milk crate’ attached to hold items. For weather–proofing, military surplus packs come in a multitude of sizes and shapes. Bug out bikers have told me you can load a bike up quite heavily, especially if you walk alongside and push it; many bikes have 150 pound or higher weight capacities. Just be sure to purchase a sturdy one. Carts for bikes can be adapted from child carriers, but I have also found nice boxy luggage carts (with waterproof tops) on the internet – Walmart carries them, so does Amazon. So between 150 pounds on the bicycle, and another 100 lb on a trailer, you can carry an amazing amount of stuff. I also purchased bike repair guides, tools, etc and try keep spare tires on hand – just in case.
Bikes are a viable, and affordable tool for toting stuff….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 4:22 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Bicycles; are they worth the Investment

June 11, 2017 kappydell 0

The deer hauler works great – made for off roading. I bought one when my husband became disabled. He was worried a bout having to go cross country in a wheel chair. We set it up so he would ride on the cart with some gear, and would cover our backside while I pulled it via a harness from the front. We could both easily access firearms if needed that way.
A little physical, but it worked. He also liked his adult trike, with a good size basket on the back. It would haul two 5 gal buckets of water at a time, and folded to fit in the van, so we would be able to use it if roads got blocked. I still have that trike, its quite comfortable and very stable.
I have seem several takes on the tactical bicycle – panniers over the back tires, luggage racks front and back with either a flat platform for lashing things on, or in one case a ‘milk crate’ attached to hold items. For weather–proofing, military surplus packs come in a multitude of sizes and shapes. Bug out bikers have told me you can load a bike up quite heavily, especially if you walk alongside and push it; many bikes have 150 pound or higher weight capacities. Just be sure to purchase a sturdy one. Carts for bikes can be adapted from child carriers, but I have also found nice boxy luggage carts (with waterproof tops) on the internet – Walmart carries them, so does Amazon. So between 150 pounds on the bicycle, and another 100 lb on a trailer, you can carry an amazing amount of stuff. I also purchased bike repair guides, tools, etc and try keep spare tires on hand – just in case.
Bikes are a viable, and affordable tool for toting stuff….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sun Jun 11, 2017 4:22 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: What Do You Expect To Achieve in a GDS

May 17, 2017 kappydell 0

This is an interesting topic. In many ways in a long term GDS it would be life as usual for me, since I have incorporated many prepper skills into habits of daily living (I save a lot of money doing things myself and it is fun). I know my neighbors well, and what they would bring to the table should we team up. I also know which neighbors won’t be bringing much to the table because they don’t prep; but they do have construction skills they can barter for food.

I am fortunate in that my area contains quite a few folks who value self reliance – they do not think of it as being part of those ‘crazy preppers’ but it is a small step to make the change if needed.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue May 16, 2017 10:18 pm


A.N.T.S. • Re: What Do You Expect To Achieve in a GDS

May 17, 2017 kappydell 0

This is an interesting topic. In many ways in a long term GDS it would be life as usual for me, since I have incorporated many prepper skills into habits of daily living (I save a lot of money doing things myself and it is fun). I know my neighbors well, and what they would bring to the table should we team up. I also know which neighbors won’t be bringing much to the table because they don’t prep; but they do have construction skills they can barter for food.

I am fortunate in that my area contains quite a few folks who value self reliance – they do not think of it as being part of those ‘crazy preppers’ but it is a small step to make the change if needed.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue May 16, 2017 10:18 pm


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Gardening

May 14, 2017 kappydell 0

Fencing of chicken wire for the bunnies; plus live traps to get the numbers down (I took them to a man who trained beagles and needed live bunnies to lay a trail for the beagles to learn to follow. He let them go afterwards, many miles away.)

I found that foil pie tins (like the little pies sold in Wal mart for 50 cents or so) strung over my corn patch kept the grackles from pulling out the sprouting corn to eat the seeds (the little stinkers).

And for the destructive woodchuck, I poured used kitty litter down the hole. Worked for me, plus a number of other folks. Those are the only critters I’ve had to battle so far….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sat May 13, 2017 10:22 pm


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Gardening

May 14, 2017 kappydell 0

Fencing of chicken wire for the bunnies; plus live traps to get the numbers down (I took them to a man who trained beagles and needed live bunnies to lay a trail for the beagles to learn to follow. He let them go afterwards, many miles away.)

I found that foil pie tins (like the little pies sold in Wal mart for 50 cents or so) strung over my corn patch kept the grackles from pulling out the sprouting corn to eat the seeds (the little stinkers).

And for the destructive woodchuck, I poured used kitty litter down the hole. Worked for me, plus a number of other folks. Those are the only critters I’ve had to battle so far….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Sat May 13, 2017 10:22 pm


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

From the Andean mountains

Since cuys are small, recipes call for one per person, unless the meat is cut into smaller portions. Most often, the cuy is split apart and cooked whole, with the head still attached.

A typical recipe for baked or barbequed cuy with a hot sauce:
3 or 4 cuys
50 grams of ground toasted corn, or cornmeal
2 kilos of parboiled potatoes, cut in slices
8 cloves of garlic
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
½ cup oil
½ cup water
salt, pepper and cumin to taste
Rub the cuys with a mix of the pepper, salt, pepper and cumin and bake. You can also skewer over a barbeque.
Prepare a sauce with the oil, peppers, garlic and cornmeal with the water from the potatoes or broth. Cook a few minutes until the peppers are cooked. When tender, place the meat in a serving dish and spoon the sauce over it. Serve with the boiled potatoes.
Another recipe calls for:
4 cuys
1 teaspoon hot pepper
1 tablespoon pisco (hot sauce)
garlic to taste
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
1/4 cup oil
salt, pepper to taste Season the cleaned cuys with salt, pepper, hot pepper and pisco. Fry in oil five minutes or until cooked.
Serve with a hot pepper sauce, potatoes, either fried or boiled and a salad of cucumber, tomato, lettuce and onion.

roasted cuy
2 lrg animals
marinade
2 x red onions, minced
4 x cloves of garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp of salt
2 Tbsp. water
2 Tbsp. oil
pinch  annatto (for coloring)
to rub on before roasting: 2 Tbsp. lard
dipping sauce:
more  annatto coloring
2 x white onions, minced
2 x cloves garlic
salt
healthy pinch of cumin
1 lrg cup. of roasted and grnd coffee
peanuts
3 1/2 c. lowfat milk
Directions
Mix ingredients well and spread over the inside and outside of the animal. Allow to marinate for up to one day to allow flavors to meld. Before roasting, remove excess marinade to avoid scalding. The spit should be inserted into the back part of the animal and exit from the jaw. Once on the stick, tie the front and back feet, stretching out the legs. Put on grill, turning manually. Continue to apply lard to the skin to avoid drying out the meat. The cuy is ready when the skin is close to bursting. Serve with boiled potatoes sprinkled with coriander, chilies, and the peanut sauce. If your community is especially progressive, rice may be substituted for the potatoes.
Peanut Dipping Sauce: Fry onions till golden, then add in other ingredients. Cook at low heat for at least half an hour.

fibbing cuy (so called because the Peruvian cook couldn’t find cuy in the US so he used rabbit and cooked by the cuy recipe (he didn’t know where to look)
Ingredients
1 rabbit, 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 lb (1.5 to 2 kg), cut into serving pieces
 
Marinade
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
 
Braise
2 tbsp olive oil
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon Amarillo Chile Paste
1 tablespoon Panca Chile Paste
7 tablespoons (100 ml) white wine
1 cup (250 ml) good-quality chicken stock
1/3 cup (50 g) roasted peanuts, ground
12 new potatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Directions
1.
Put the rabbit pieces in a bowl. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a bowl and use your hands to massage the marinade into the rabbit pieces, making sure they are well covered. Season with salt and pepper and leave to marinate for at least a couple hours.
2.
Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Fry the rabbit pieces on all sides until evenly browned. Remove the rabbit from the pan with a slotted spoon and add the onion. Sauté the onion until translucent and then add the chile pastes. Cook for a further couple minutes and then deglaze the pan with the white wine. Scrape vigorously to make sure nothing is sticking and then add the stock. Return the pieces of rabbit to the pan. Cover and simmer over low heat for about 1 hour.
3.
Meanwhile, boil the potatoes in plenty of water until they are firm but tender inside. Drain, and when cool enough to handle, cut the potatoes in half crosswise.
4.
Stir in the peanuts and leave to simmer uncovered for a further 30 minutes, until the sauce has thickened and the rabbit is very tender. Add the potatoes and leave them to heat through. Serve sprinkled with the parsley.

Methods of Making Cuy Recipes
• Frying – This is quite acceptable method for making cuy dishes. This cooking method is also known as Frito or choctado.
• Broiling – This is the best method adopted for making cuy recipes. Broiling makes the meat tender as well as retains the juices.
• Roasting – Al horno or roasting is the traditional cooking method for cuy.
• Baking – This is the most contemporary method of making this meat and highly adopted in urban restaurants.
• Barbequing – Huatia is the term given to this cooking process and it is highly recommended for cuy cooking. Barbeque cuy recipes are popularly served corn beer.

Cuisines Commonly Making Cuy Recipes
Andean highland is the main region where cuy is fondly eaten as one of the varieties of meat. Peruvian and Bolivian cuisines are highly famous for using this meat in their regular as well as ceremonial dishes.

Buying and Storing of Cuy (in Bolivia)
Cuy can easily be procured from the local meat shops and if needed in bulk then municipal fairs in Andes are the good option. Like other meats, this meat should also be fresh. The appearance of this meat is quiet similar to rabbit meat or dark chicken flesh.
It can be stored in freezer if storage period is longer. Prepared dishes can either be stored in refrigerator it freezer and should be consumed with in 2-3 days.

Health Facts Related to Cuy Recipes
Protein content is quiet high in cuy meat and it is relatively lower in fat and cholesterol.

You might say I specialize in odd recipes…….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:01 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

From the Andean mountains

Since cuys are small, recipes call for one per person, unless the meat is cut into smaller portions. Most often, the cuy is split apart and cooked whole, with the head still attached.

A typical recipe for baked or barbequed cuy with a hot sauce:
3 or 4 cuys
50 grams of ground toasted corn, or cornmeal
2 kilos of parboiled potatoes, cut in slices
8 cloves of garlic
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
½ cup oil
½ cup water
salt, pepper and cumin to taste
Rub the cuys with a mix of the pepper, salt, pepper and cumin and bake. You can also skewer over a barbeque.
Prepare a sauce with the oil, peppers, garlic and cornmeal with the water from the potatoes or broth. Cook a few minutes until the peppers are cooked. When tender, place the meat in a serving dish and spoon the sauce over it. Serve with the boiled potatoes.
Another recipe calls for:
4 cuys
1 teaspoon hot pepper
1 tablespoon pisco (hot sauce)
garlic to taste
6 fresh hot peppers, either red or yellow
1/4 cup oil
salt, pepper to taste Season the cleaned cuys with salt, pepper, hot pepper and pisco. Fry in oil five minutes or until cooked.
Serve with a hot pepper sauce, potatoes, either fried or boiled and a salad of cucumber, tomato, lettuce and onion.

roasted cuy
2 lrg animals
marinade
2 x red onions, minced
4 x cloves of garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp white pepper
2 tsp of salt
2 Tbsp. water
2 Tbsp. oil
pinch  annatto (for coloring)
to rub on before roasting: 2 Tbsp. lard
dipping sauce:
more  annatto coloring
2 x white onions, minced
2 x cloves garlic
salt
healthy pinch of cumin
1 lrg cup. of roasted and grnd coffee
peanuts
3 1/2 c. lowfat milk
Directions
Mix ingredients well and spread over the inside and outside of the animal. Allow to marinate for up to one day to allow flavors to meld. Before roasting, remove excess marinade to avoid scalding. The spit should be inserted into the back part of the animal and exit from the jaw. Once on the stick, tie the front and back feet, stretching out the legs. Put on grill, turning manually. Continue to apply lard to the skin to avoid drying out the meat. The cuy is ready when the skin is close to bursting. Serve with boiled potatoes sprinkled with coriander, chilies, and the peanut sauce. If your community is especially progressive, rice may be substituted for the potatoes.
Peanut Dipping Sauce: Fry onions till golden, then add in other ingredients. Cook at low heat for at least half an hour.

fibbing cuy (so called because the Peruvian cook couldn’t find cuy in the US so he used rabbit and cooked by the cuy recipe (he didn’t know where to look)
Ingredients
1 rabbit, 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 lb (1.5 to 2 kg), cut into serving pieces
 
Marinade
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
 
Braise
2 tbsp olive oil
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon Amarillo Chile Paste
1 tablespoon Panca Chile Paste
7 tablespoons (100 ml) white wine
1 cup (250 ml) good-quality chicken stock
1/3 cup (50 g) roasted peanuts, ground
12 new potatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Directions
1.
Put the rabbit pieces in a bowl. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a bowl and use your hands to massage the marinade into the rabbit pieces, making sure they are well covered. Season with salt and pepper and leave to marinate for at least a couple hours.
2.
Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Fry the rabbit pieces on all sides until evenly browned. Remove the rabbit from the pan with a slotted spoon and add the onion. Sauté the onion until translucent and then add the chile pastes. Cook for a further couple minutes and then deglaze the pan with the white wine. Scrape vigorously to make sure nothing is sticking and then add the stock. Return the pieces of rabbit to the pan. Cover and simmer over low heat for about 1 hour.
3.
Meanwhile, boil the potatoes in plenty of water until they are firm but tender inside. Drain, and when cool enough to handle, cut the potatoes in half crosswise.
4.
Stir in the peanuts and leave to simmer uncovered for a further 30 minutes, until the sauce has thickened and the rabbit is very tender. Add the potatoes and leave them to heat through. Serve sprinkled with the parsley.

Methods of Making Cuy Recipes
• Frying – This is quite acceptable method for making cuy dishes. This cooking method is also known as Frito or choctado.
• Broiling – This is the best method adopted for making cuy recipes. Broiling makes the meat tender as well as retains the juices.
• Roasting – Al horno or roasting is the traditional cooking method for cuy.
• Baking – This is the most contemporary method of making this meat and highly adopted in urban restaurants.
• Barbequing – Huatia is the term given to this cooking process and it is highly recommended for cuy cooking. Barbeque cuy recipes are popularly served corn beer.

Cuisines Commonly Making Cuy Recipes
Andean highland is the main region where cuy is fondly eaten as one of the varieties of meat. Peruvian and Bolivian cuisines are highly famous for using this meat in their regular as well as ceremonial dishes.

Buying and Storing of Cuy (in Bolivia)
Cuy can easily be procured from the local meat shops and if needed in bulk then municipal fairs in Andes are the good option. Like other meats, this meat should also be fresh. The appearance of this meat is quiet similar to rabbit meat or dark chicken flesh.
It can be stored in freezer if storage period is longer. Prepared dishes can either be stored in refrigerator it freezer and should be consumed with in 2-3 days.

Health Facts Related to Cuy Recipes
Protein content is quiet high in cuy meat and it is relatively lower in fat and cholesterol.

You might say I specialize in odd recipes…….

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:01 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

I stand on my “don’t ask, don’t tell” rule when purchasing certain items…like feed store grains for human consumption, or “pets” as protein. I’m told rats taste like squirrel….makes sense they are all rodents……one cuy is generally one serving in a South American restaurant, weight varies.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 2:30 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 kappydell 0

I stand on my “don’t ask, don’t tell” rule when purchasing certain items…like feed store grains for human consumption, or “pets” as protein. I’m told rats taste like squirrel….makes sense they are all rodents……one cuy is generally one serving in a South American restaurant, weight varies.

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Wed Apr 05, 2017 2:30 am