No Picture

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 16, 2017 Cast Iron 0
BK in KC wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Your facts do not reflect my personal experience or observations.

You stick with your facts.

I will stick with my personal experience and observations.

That’s fine except we’re giving advice to a person on a firearm that she may need to use to defend her life. If not for that I’d have no problem to agree to disagree.

object

How is it my fault to advise her to use quality ammunition that will fire every single time vs your advise to use faulty ammunition that may or may not fire?
I recommend anyone to use quality ammunition.
Not the Wal-Mart, bargain box green and yellow or white box ammunition.
You think Olympic biathlons use Remington, Winchester, or CCI?
No. They use Lapua, SK, RWS, Eley.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sat Apr 15, 2017 7:29 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
BK in KC wrote:
There is a reason the old Henry rifles that fired .44 rimfire used dual firing pins. Just saying.

The reliability issue is a limitation of physics. Rimfire cartridges have a thin hollow rim and the primer is “spun” into the hollow rim. Trouble is the priming compound isn’t always distributed evenly and sometimes doesn’t ignite when crushed. This makes rimfite inherently less reliable than centerfire.

Your facts do not reflect my personal experience or observations.

You stick with your facts.

I will stick with my personal experience and observations.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Apr 13, 2017 7:46 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Aunt Bee, Could you handle a P-90? No recoil, holds 21 rounds I think but it is a full sized pistol. Their kinda pricey though but accurate to 200 yards.

P90?
Or Five-seveN?

I do not think either are NY compliant.

Pending her eyesight, she may be better off with a .22LR that can accommodate a red dot or EO vs. iron sights.

Laser could be an option as well.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Apr 13, 2017 7:43 pm


No Picture

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 14, 2017 Cast Iron 0
oldasrocks wrote:
Aunt Bee, Could you handle a P-90? No recoil, holds 21 rounds I think but it is a full sized pistol. Their kinda pricey though but accurate to 200 yards.

P90?
Or Five-seveN?

I do not think either are NY compliant.

Pending her eyesight, she may be better off with a .22LR that can accommodate a red dot or EO vs. iron sights.

Laser could be an option as well.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Apr 13, 2017 7:43 pm


No Picture

Prepper Fiction • Re: The Fall

April 13, 2017 Cast Iron 0
pilgrimtr wrote:
Thank you Cast Iron,
I will keep reading if you will keep posting ;) And I won’t scold you. unless you need it. pilgrim :lol:

No worries Pilgrim.
Occasionally I need the kick in the posterior end to keep at it and stop looking at cookbooks.

I have the first town meeting written and a few re-writes, but it still needs something . . .
Need to post it soon, least NK does something crazy, that in alone in itself is highly amusing. The first draft of the first town meeting I mention NK before all this craZy started in the real world.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Apr 13, 2017 8:39 am


No Picture

Prepper Fiction • Re: The Fall

April 13, 2017 Cast Iron 0
pilgrimtr wrote:
Thank you Cast Iron,
I will keep reading if you will keep posting ;) And I won’t scold you. unless you need it. pilgrim :lol:

No worries Pilgrim.
Occasionally I need the kick in the posterior end to keep at it and stop looking at cookbooks.

I have the first town meeting written and a few re-writes, but it still needs something . . .
Need to post it soon, least NK does something crazy, that in alone in itself is highly amusing. The first draft of the first town meeting I mention NK before all this craZy started in the real world.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Apr 13, 2017 8:39 am


No Picture

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 12, 2017 Cast Iron 0
BK in KC wrote:

Cast Iron wrote: As for failure to fire, if you use quality ammunition will mitigate some if not all of those issues.
And, keep it reasonably clean.

I have experienced failure to fire even with premium match-grade .22 ammo. Better ammo does help but rimfire is inherently less reliable than center-fire ammo. It’s just a fact.

I ran several hundred rounds of Eley through a old Ruger MKII. Did not clean it once.
No issues.
I have had the same results with Lapua, SK, RWS.
Just saying.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:37 am


Image

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 12, 2017 Cast Iron 0
BK in KC wrote:

Cast Iron wrote: As for failure to fire, if you use quality ammunition will mitigate some if not all of those issues.
And, keep it reasonably clean.

I have experienced failure to fire even with premium match-grade .22 ammo. Better ammo does help but rimfire is inherently less reliable than center-fire ammo. It’s just a fact.

I ran several hundred rounds of Eley through a old Ruger MKII. Did not clean it once.
No issues.
I have had the same results with Lapua, SK, RWS.
Just saying.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:37 am


No Picture

Prepper Fiction • Re: The Fall

April 12, 2017 Cast Iron 0

The garden cart wobbled behind Jack as he strained to pull it across the field and up next to the raised bed garden box. The ‘box’ was more like a five foot wide by fifty foot long rectangle. It was the fourth new raised bed they built since that morning using slab wood they got from the Amish. Originally they were going to use the slab wood to make some rustic chairs, tables, and a coffee table for the back yard. Now their would be patio furniture was going to help them increase their food production.
Jack used the back of his work gloves to brush the sweat from his brow. His watch indicated it was in the upper sixties, the barometer was high and holding steady. Hauling cow, goat, and rabbit compost aged for two years from the back of the barn to the new gardens was a work out.
Jess was equally sweaty and dirty as she stood in the box, spreading out the compost into a six inch thick layer. They both paused, taking a moment to rest.
“What do you think?” Jess asked.
“About what?” Jack panted.
“The new gardens. Be enough?”
“Well, these new four, with the other three that is about 1,750 square feet of planting space. But we are doing the Three Sisters with the corn, the beans and squash. We train the cukes, and melons on the edges of the boxes into the space in between the boxes. So, that can gain us some more planting space. Go vertical where we can.”
“Do not forget the runner beans in the containers along the backyard fencing.”
“Right, that is another, what, 200 liner feet for beans. The potatoes in the tyre beds did really well last year. Plenty of unused tyres to be had. We can plant beets, carrots, in those too.” He paused. “It can not be worse than last year.” He gave her a reassuring smile. She smiled and they got back to work.

An hour and half and a dozen carts of compost later, Jack and Jess sat down at the picnic table with a pitcher of tea between them.
“Thank goodness wild mint comes up so early,” Jess took a sip of the mint tea. “I was getting bored with that industrial tea we traded for.”
“It got us through the winter.”
“I know.” She sighed, “What I would do for a cup of real coffee. The good stuff. Not that burnt crap in the green and white bag.”
“Yeah.” He changed topics, “As long as we do not have any catastrophic incidents, like a drought or flooding, I think we will be ok. We have the gardens. The winter wheat I plated last year will be ready by mid summer. The spring wheat I planted a month or so ago will be ready in late fall. Keep half for flour, the other half for seed.” He took a sip of his tea. “The goats kidded out, doubling the herd size. Sally farrowed ten good looking piglets. Not bad for her first litter.”
“The chickens are going to need replaced. This is their third year. We are not getting as many eggs.”
“Well, that should settle up our trade with Greg: three gallons of maple syrup, ten cords of seasoned fire wood, cut, split and delivered. And figure forty replacement chicks, half hens, half roos. Should be a good deal for one fully grown hog. In the mean time, we have stew birds for Sunday dinner for fifteen Sundays.”
“You know we have never gone though ten cords of wood in a winter. We still have three in the wood shed.”
“True enough. But we are cooking with wood nearly every day now. I want to build up a few extra cords every year so we will have two years worth at any given time. We will use whatever dead fall out on our land to cook with.”
“Well howdy stranger!” Jess called over Jack’s shoulder as Claire was walking up to the picnic table. “Have not seen you in a few days, was beginning to think Jack’s stink offended you!”
“It should!” Jack said.
Claire smiled at the ground, and blushed.
“I have been over to your house nearly every day since I came here. I thought maybe you and Jack might like some time alone without me always around.”
“Nonsense, Claire! You are always welcome. Have a seat, I will get you a glass for some mint tea. Got to make a head call anyways.” Jack got up and went into the farm house.
“I-, I went and saw Mrs. Anderson like you suggested,” Claire said quietly as she took a seat across from Jess.
‘Oh?”
“Yes. We are going to meet once a week . . . to talk about things.”
“Good, that is good.”
“Yeah. She said I should start a journal and write down my thoughts . . . if I could find any paper and something to write with.” Claire smiled.
Jess gave her a reassuring smile back. “Yes, paper is kind of hard to come by. Who would of thought how valuable it would be. I will keep my eyes out for some at the market for you.”
“Oh, no, that is ok. Mrs. Anderson told me I should,” Claire rolled her eyes but blushed, “I should talk out loud about things, and then think on them from a third person point of view.”
“Well if that works, then it works right?”
“Yeah, but it kind weird pacing around the house talking to myself,” Claire made a face but then smiled and laughed.
“What is so funny,” Jack returned, took a seat next to Jess, and poured Claire a glass of tea.
“Oh, nothing. Thank you,” Claire said as she took the glass from Jack. “So, what are you two talking about?” Claire changed the conversation.
Jack and Jess gave each other a look and then began to laugh.
“What else does it seem like we are always talking about,” Jack asked.
“Food!” Jess answered.
“Speaking of food,” Claire straightened up in her seat and announced proudly, “I made my first rabbit stew last night.”
“Hey! Good for you!”
“How did it go?” Jess asked.
“Well, the slaughtering was not easy. Gutting is just gross, so is skinning. But I am confident I can do it again. And my stew turned out pretty good if I do say so myself. Thank you for the rabbit.”
“Hey, no need to say thank you. You earned that rabbit helping Jess muck out the barn while I was out with the livestock.”
“The two litters of rabbits we had over the winter will be ready soon. You help us plant seeds tomorrow in trade for your own breed pair. Deal?” Jess held out her hand.
“Deal!” Jess and Claire shook. “What are we planting?”
“Well, I have a flat of broccoli seedlings, a flat of cabbage seedlings, a flat of beet seedlings that all need transplanted. Then I have two flats of different herb seedlings. Basil, parsley, tarragon, marjoram, and dill. Seeds: chard, carrots, beets, rutabaga, parsnips, lettuce, and some others I am forgetting.”
“That is a lot.”
“We are expanding,” Jess explained, “Last year was rough. Like ‘are we going to make it?’ rough.”
“We got a late start with the gardens,” Jack added.
“Why is that?” Claire asked.
Both Jess and Jack went quiet. Their bodies seemed to stiffen.
“Some things happened last year,” Jack said quietly and glanced down at the table. He did not offer further explanation.
“The War?” Claire pressed. Jack’s head snapped up, then he looked to Jess. Neither said anything. “I hear it mentioned once in awhile but only in passing. At the market. At other gatherings.” Claire continued. “But just as it is mentioned, they change the subject. What happened?”
“It is a long, and not very pretty story,” Jack stated after a pause.
Claire simply shrugged.
Jack looked at Jess, “Where do we start?”
Jess thought for a moment.
“The first town hall meeting,” she answered.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:30 am


Image

Prepper Fiction • Re: The Fall

April 12, 2017 Cast Iron 0

The garden cart wobbled behind Jack as he strained to pull it across the field and up next to the raised bed garden box. The ‘box’ was more like a five foot wide by fifty foot long rectangle. It was the fourth new raised bed they built since that morning using slab wood they got from the Amish. Originally they were going to use the slab wood to make some rustic chairs, tables, and a coffee table for the back yard. Now their would be patio furniture was going to help them increase their food production.
Jack used the back of his work gloves to brush the sweat from his brow. His watch indicated it was in the upper sixties, the barometer was high and holding steady. Hauling cow, goat, and rabbit compost aged for two years from the back of the barn to the new gardens was a work out.
Jess was equally sweaty and dirty as she stood in the box, spreading out the compost into a six inch thick layer. They both paused, taking a moment to rest.
“What do you think?” Jess asked.
“About what?” Jack panted.
“The new gardens. Be enough?”
“Well, these new four, with the other three that is about 1,750 square feet of planting space. But we are doing the Three Sisters with the corn, the beans and squash. We train the cukes, and melons on the edges of the boxes into the space in between the boxes. So, that can gain us some more planting space. Go vertical where we can.”
“Do not forget the runner beans in the containers along the backyard fencing.”
“Right, that is another, what, 200 liner feet for beans. The potatoes in the tyre beds did really well last year. Plenty of unused tyres to be had. We can plant beets, carrots, in those too.” He paused. “It can not be worse than last year.” He gave her a reassuring smile. She smiled and they got back to work.

An hour and half and a dozen carts of compost later, Jack and Jess sat down at the picnic table with a pitcher of tea between them.
“Thank goodness wild mint comes up so early,” Jess took a sip of the mint tea. “I was getting bored with that industrial tea we traded for.”
“It got us through the winter.”
“I know.” She sighed, “What I would do for a cup of real coffee. The good stuff. Not that burnt crap in the green and white bag.”
“Yeah.” He changed topics, “As long as we do not have any catastrophic incidents, like a drought or flooding, I think we will be ok. We have the gardens. The winter wheat I plated last year will be ready by mid summer. The spring wheat I planted a month or so ago will be ready in late fall. Keep half for flour, the other half for seed.” He took a sip of his tea. “The goats kidded out, doubling the herd size. Sally farrowed ten good looking piglets. Not bad for her first litter.”
“The chickens are going to need replaced. This is their third year. We are not getting as many eggs.”
“Well, that should settle up our trade with Greg: three gallons of maple syrup, ten cords of seasoned fire wood, cut, split and delivered. And figure forty replacement chicks, half hens, half roos. Should be a good deal for one fully grown hog. In the mean time, we have stew birds for Sunday dinner for fifteen Sundays.”
“You know we have never gone though ten cords of wood in a winter. We still have three in the wood shed.”
“True enough. But we are cooking with wood nearly every day now. I want to build up a few extra cords every year so we will have two years worth at any given time. We will use whatever dead fall out on our land to cook with.”
“Well howdy stranger!” Jess called over Jack’s shoulder as Claire was walking up to the picnic table. “Have not seen you in a few days, was beginning to think Jack’s stink offended you!”
“It should!” Jack said.
Claire smiled at the ground, and blushed.
“I have been over to your house nearly every day since I came here. I thought maybe you and Jack might like some time alone without me always around.”
“Nonsense, Claire! You are always welcome. Have a seat, I will get you a glass for some mint tea. Got to make a head call anyways.” Jack got up and went into the farm house.
“I-, I went and saw Mrs. Anderson like you suggested,” Claire said quietly as she took a seat across from Jess.
‘Oh?”
“Yes. We are going to meet once a week . . . to talk about things.”
“Good, that is good.”
“Yeah. She said I should start a journal and write down my thoughts . . . if I could find any paper and something to write with.” Claire smiled.
Jess gave her a reassuring smile back. “Yes, paper is kind of hard to come by. Who would of thought how valuable it would be. I will keep my eyes out for some at the market for you.”
“Oh, no, that is ok. Mrs. Anderson told me I should,” Claire rolled her eyes but blushed, “I should talk out loud about things, and then think on them from a third person point of view.”
“Well if that works, then it works right?”
“Yeah, but it kind weird pacing around the house talking to myself,” Claire made a face but then smiled and laughed.
“What is so funny,” Jack returned, took a seat next to Jess, and poured Claire a glass of tea.
“Oh, nothing. Thank you,” Claire said as she took the glass from Jack. “So, what are you two talking about?” Claire changed the conversation.
Jack and Jess gave each other a look and then began to laugh.
“What else does it seem like we are always talking about,” Jack asked.
“Food!” Jess answered.
“Speaking of food,” Claire straightened up in her seat and announced proudly, “I made my first rabbit stew last night.”
“Hey! Good for you!”
“How did it go?” Jess asked.
“Well, the slaughtering was not easy. Gutting is just gross, so is skinning. But I am confident I can do it again. And my stew turned out pretty good if I do say so myself. Thank you for the rabbit.”
“Hey, no need to say thank you. You earned that rabbit helping Jess muck out the barn while I was out with the livestock.”
“The two litters of rabbits we had over the winter will be ready soon. You help us plant seeds tomorrow in trade for your own breed pair. Deal?” Jess held out her hand.
“Deal!” Jess and Claire shook. “What are we planting?”
“Well, I have a flat of broccoli seedlings, a flat of cabbage seedlings, a flat of beet seedlings that all need transplanted. Then I have two flats of different herb seedlings. Basil, parsley, tarragon, marjoram, and dill. Seeds: chard, carrots, beets, rutabaga, parsnips, lettuce, and some others I am forgetting.”
“That is a lot.”
“We are expanding,” Jess explained, “Last year was rough. Like ‘are we going to make it?’ rough.”
“We got a late start with the gardens,” Jack added.
“Why is that?” Claire asked.
Both Jess and Jack went quiet. Their bodies seemed to stiffen.
“Some things happened last year,” Jack said quietly and glanced down at the table. He did not offer further explanation.
“The War?” Claire pressed. Jack’s head snapped up, then he looked to Jess. Neither said anything. “I hear it mentioned once in awhile but only in passing. At the market. At other gatherings.” Claire continued. “But just as it is mentioned, they change the subject. What happened?”
“It is a long, and not very pretty story,” Jack stated after a pause.
Claire simply shrugged.
Jack looked at Jess, “Where do we start?”
Jess thought for a moment.
“The first town hall meeting,” she answered.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:30 am


No Picture

Guns • Re: Handgun recommendation requested

April 12, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Aunt Bee,
Have you personally handled either of those hand guns? The ergonomics should be your deciding factor. Best if you can take one out and put a box or three of ammunition through it.
Some of those will have aftermarket grips that may feel more comfortable or give you better control.
I have shot a .22LR Ruger revolver. It was nice, but the grip was way too small for me. It may fit better in your hands if you choose to go that route.
As for failure to fire, if you use quality ammunition will mitigate some if not all of those issues.
And, keep it reasonably clean.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:01 am


No Picture

Guns • Re: Gun sales depending on the presidency

April 11, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Post election euphoria?

Sales and prices have come down. I see this as a buying opportunity.

I do not know of anyone who was a first time buyer during the previous admin. More repeat buyers.

I think we will see another rise in sales as 2020 comes closer. Especially who appears to be the front runner for the Dem ticket.
Read an article of Cumo was a possible 2020 contender. He is very shady and very anti-2A.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:10 am


Guns • Re: Gun sales depending on the presidency

April 11, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Post election euphoria?

Sales and prices have come down. I see this as a buying opportunity.

I do not know of anyone who was a first time buyer during the previous admin. More repeat buyers.

I think we will see another rise in sales as 2020 comes closer. Especially who appears to be the front runner for the Dem ticket.
Read an article of Cumo was a possible 2020 contender. He is very shady and very anti-2A.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:10 am


No Picture

Prepper Fiction • Re: The Fall

April 10, 2017 Cast Iron 0
pilgrimtr wrote:
well it looks like I have reeled in once again. march 13 was the last post of this story. almost a month. I keep getting hooked into these stories and then the author quits writing. oh well I guess I’ll learn not to start reading these stories. and just read the one’s that are posted as complete. :angry: pilgrim

Pilgrim and others who have read along, my apologies.

I have been slack.

I have been working on it, I have a substantial outline written . . . I just need to sit down and put it to paper.

Again, my apologies.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:12 am


No Picture

Texas Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Who to let in your group, the how’s and why’s.

April 8, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Best way to mitigate the need for certain professions is to gain those skill sets yourself.
Granted, easier said than done but it can be done.

Join the military to gain expertise not only in small arms, and small team tactics, but leadership, logistics, communications etc.

As Swampy said, take away the modern medical support and doctors just got kicked back 50 or 100 years. An EMT course followed up by a NOLS WIlderness EMT course can get you by a lot of medical issues, at least physical ones.
Some basic biology equipment can get you a small lab to do basic testing. College level biology class with a lab can help you get a foundation of lab procedures.

Farmer. Get out there and become one. Read a lot. There are online classes you can take, Cornell offers a number of them. They have a great small farmer website.
Most farmers are their own vets, or at least if you do not want to incur medical bills.

If there is a skill set, say blacksmith, your group needs do the cost/risk analysis, then make a decision.
The blacksmith has a family, well that comes with gaining that asset.
How group dynamics play out I think is a yet to be seen issue. Take it as it comes along.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sat Apr 08, 2017 7:36 am


No Picture

Louisiana Discussion, News and Weather • Re: The big one is coming!

April 8, 2017 Cast Iron 0
MoosePath wrote:
Call me a conspiracy theorist, I think all of us preppers have a little of that in us, but I feel this could be the next big thing. The world is getting over crowded and the “powers that be” know this. We are using up all the natural resources of this planet and the “pretty people” need a way to stop this from happening. Wars destroy property and infrastructure, poisons land and water and could potentially lead to nuclear war or melt downs of power plants. The powers that be certainly do not want this. EMP’s could accomplish huge population declines but also could destroy property by riots and power plant meltdowns. But a planned pandemic could keep much of the planets resources intact. Strategic people could be put in place to power down nuclear plants as the pandemic wanes and the people in power have a vaccination to keep the “right” people safe. Most likely riots would be to a minimum because people will not venture outside for fear of getting the flu, and if they did they would avoid large crowds. They’d make a half hearted effort to appear to be doing something but the cure would never happen until populations plummeted. They wouldn’t let everyone die because you would need the servants to work for their new world masters. I don’t know maybe this way of thinking is off the deep end but I wouldn’t be surprised if this scenario came to fruition. You can call me nuts but we just bombed a man who poisoned his own people, humans in power over the length of history have shown the propensity to eliminate undesirable people. Resources on this planet are slowly running out and there will be lots and lots of unnecessary undesirable people using up those valuable resources. Food for thought.

Interesting theory. Has merit. I would be inclined to agree.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Sat Apr 08, 2017 7:08 am


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Today is The First Day of The Rest of Your Life

April 7, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Dirk Williams wrote:
Like RM, I live in a sun division, in Klamath Falls Oregon. A look at the nuke map shows we are ideally placed for zero targeting, or fall out problems. That being said, if your associates and you haven’t had this conversation already. Ya better get jiggy.

We have a core group of 5/8 houses on my short street, that are preppers, and have agreed to work together for mutual benifit,,and protection.

Two summers ago, a new sub division was put in at the end of our dead end street. The street is now a thru street with roughly 10 new homes. Things did change that area was intended to be used for pasture and row crops.

The animals were to be used and harvested as needed, but more importantly as breeding stock, for the future. Times change plans change. I suppose we’ll just move them yard to yard as needed for their preservation.

Dirk

By the way, while I’ve been very vocally in support of Trump, I have doubled my prepper food purchases. We generally purchase one case of freeze dried food a month we are now doubling this. We’re at 7 years on about 90/100 cases of #10 can cases, or regular food. We’re slowly switching this out.

Donating it to homelass shelters and to ” urban campers” as our local police chief wants to,call these folks, what a joke.

Anyways if your not communicating with others on the block it’s to late after the ballon goes up. We have actually agreed with several small farms and families within a 4 mile circle to assist as QRF, in a critical situation. They will respond likewise.

Of course the goal is to never have to cross this bridge.

Dirk

A sound plan you have there.

Better than being a Spider Person or bunker bunny.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:34 pm


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Today is The First Day of The Rest of Your Life

April 7, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Dirk Williams wrote:
Like RM, I live in a sun division, in Klamath Falls Oregon. A look at the nuke map shows we are ideally placed for zero targeting, or fall out problems. That being said, if your associates and you haven’t had this conversation already. Ya better get jiggy.

We have a core group of 5/8 houses on my short street, that are preppers, and have agreed to work together for mutual benifit,,and protection.

Two summers ago, a new sub division was put in at the end of our dead end street. The street is now a thru street with roughly 10 new homes. Things did change that area was intended to be used for pasture and row crops.

The animals were to be used and harvested as needed, but more importantly as breeding stock, for the future. Times change plans change. I suppose we’ll just move them yard to yard as needed for their preservation.

Dirk

By the way, while I’ve been very vocally in support of Trump, I have doubled my prepper food purchases. We generally purchase one case of freeze dried food a month we are now doubling this. We’re at 7 years on about 90/100 cases of #10 can cases, or regular food. We’re slowly switching this out.

Donating it to homelass shelters and to ” urban campers” as our local police chief wants to,call these folks, what a joke.

Anyways if your not communicating with others on the block it’s to late after the ballon goes up. We have actually agreed with several small farms and families within a 4 mile circle to assist as QRF, in a critical situation. They will respond likewise.

Of course the goal is to never have to cross this bridge.

Dirk

A sound plan you have there.

Better than being a Spider Person or bunker bunny.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:34 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: “There Are Dead People In The Street”

April 7, 2017 Cast Iron 0

I do not know how it will be reported in todays biased media.

In the past, a mass shooting, nearly immediate calls for gun control. The scene would be played out for days or weeks.
Until the past few mass shootings turned out to be people who have been radicalized by events in the ME or ISIS. Then the tune seemed to change. Still got reported on, but seemed muted.
Of course part of it is the governments need to not admit radical terrorism is here. No direct link to ISIS and the such as if that made the situation better. From my point of view the non-link is worse as it is much harder to detect. But the government can not say that.

If there was a truck or vehicle attack here in the US today, how would it be reported, again, in todays biased media?

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Fri Apr 07, 2017 10:31 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: “There Are Dead People In The Street”

April 7, 2017 Cast Iron 0

I do not know how it will be reported in todays biased media.

In the past, a mass shooting, nearly immediate calls for gun control. The scene would be played out for days or weeks.
Until the past few mass shootings turned out to be people who have been radicalized by events in the ME or ISIS. Then the tune seemed to change. Still got reported on, but seemed muted.
Of course part of it is the governments need to not admit radical terrorism is here. No direct link to ISIS and the such as if that made the situation better. From my point of view the non-link is worse as it is much harder to detect. But the government can not say that.

If there was a truck or vehicle attack here in the US today, how would it be reported, again, in todays biased media?

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Fri Apr 07, 2017 10:31 am


Image

New Hampshire Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Small Arms .22 for hunting

April 6, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Face in the wind wrote:
I have plenty of .22 guns but my favorite small game gun is my .25 cal Benjamin Marauder air rifle. This thing is whisper quiet. My neighbors have no idea when I am shooting it. It fires off a .25 caliber pellet at 900 fps and is extremely accurate. I can repeatedly shoot the same blade of grass at 75 yards. I’ve never owned a rifle so accurate. I use it for hunting many types of small game.

http://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Benjamin_ … /1774/6467

Best of all there is no shortage of ammo.

I have the MRod in .22.
Great for pest control and target practice, especially at longer ranges. Really learn how to read the wind.
Great way to train or maintain the fundamentals without advertising it to the whole neighborhood. OPSEC.
Great thing about the MRod, you can mod it in a variety of ways.
For the price of some 500ct .22LR, I can have 2k of match grade pellets delivered to my door. No hazmat charges.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:54 am


Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
3ADScout wrote:
Is it me or are we really on the brink of a major 2 front conflict? Don’t want to use “War” since it won’t look like any “War” we have ever known. Watch for cyber attacks both from and in N. Korea to increase. Cyber is the FIRST strike weapon now a days. Besides the Korea issue we have President Trump talking tough on Syria. In my opinion this have nothing on the later days of the Cold War. Hopefully it doesn’t start looking like the Cuban Missile crisis but aren’t we actually dealing with the same issue?

Good observation.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 6:28 pm


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
3ADScout wrote:
Is it me or are we really on the brink of a major 2 front conflict? Don’t want to use “War” since it won’t look like any “War” we have ever known. Watch for cyber attacks both from and in N. Korea to increase. Cyber is the FIRST strike weapon now a days. Besides the Korea issue we have President Trump talking tough on Syria. In my opinion this have nothing on the later days of the Cold War. Hopefully it doesn’t start looking like the Cuban Missile crisis but aren’t we actually dealing with the same issue?

Good observation.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 6:28 pm


No Picture

Construction Cornerstone • Re: Hide in plain sight OR Wall around home

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Cin wrote:
Sometimes, I wonder of the nomadic people were nomadic just to stay out harm’s way. Especially the Native Americans could up and move without anyone knowing they’d gone or where they taken off to. something to be said for traveling light and only being about to take what you could carry. They followed their food during the seasons, but I’m sure they went hungry a lot, too.

Of course, with the billions of folks on this planet now, that way of life is hardly sustainable.

Well, is not the American way of life so myopic, many to most would die in the first few months and to a degree, after the first year?

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 6:25 pm


No Picture

Construction Cornerstone • Re: Hide in plain sight OR Wall around home

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
Cin wrote:
Sometimes, I wonder of the nomadic people were nomadic just to stay out harm’s way. Especially the Native Americans could up and move without anyone knowing they’d gone or where they taken off to. something to be said for traveling light and only being about to take what you could carry. They followed their food during the seasons, but I’m sure they went hungry a lot, too.

Of course, with the billions of folks on this planet now, that way of life is hardly sustainable.

Well, is not the American way of life so myopic, many to most would die in the first few months and to a degree, after the first year?

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 6:25 pm


No Picture

Other weapons • Re: chemical pest control

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Who the heck thought that was a good idea?

I agree with RickDun.

I know in some areas out in the West they have coy competitions.
In the summer, every year, I wake up from a dead sleep to the sound of coy howling in the not so far distance.
Once, while the wife and I were moving the cows, late one afternoon, early evening, heard a pack close by. Like still on our property, quarter mile close. Enough to make your hair stand on end.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:44 pm


No Picture

Other weapons • Re: chemical pest control

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Who the heck thought that was a good idea?

I agree with RickDun.

I know in some areas out in the West they have coy competitions.
In the summer, every year, I wake up from a dead sleep to the sound of coy howling in the not so far distance.
Once, while the wife and I were moving the cows, late one afternoon, early evening, heard a pack close by. Like still on our property, quarter mile close. Enough to make your hair stand on end.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:44 pm


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:06 am


No Picture

Livestock and more • Re: Guinea pigs as livestock??????

April 5, 2017 Cast Iron 0
IceFire wrote:

Cast Iron wrote:Thank you very much for that information.

I am actually looking at getting a buck this week.

Make sure you keep him well downwind! When we brought our little buckling home, he stank from the two bucks in the herd. After a couple of days, however, the “billy goat funk” was gone (thankfully) Once the hormones kick in, however, the stank will return. Bucks have two sets of “scent” glands…one set where you’d expect it…near the “nether portions.” To make sure that their scent will “surround” them so as to attract the “ladies”, a buck will pee on the backs of his front legs, as well as on his beard! The OTHER billy goat scent glands are located at the back of the head, behind the horns. Those scent gland pretty much are inactive until a buck goes into rut. Then the stink will begin. A wether (castrated male) will NOT develop the stink as long as you get the deed done BEFORE he gets old enough to develop those hormones.

If you do decide to castrate a buckling, it is really easy. There is a tool that has 4 prongs, over which you place the bands. Then, just open it up to stretch the band, then place it over the sac, close to the body (just make sure that you don’t catch the vestigial teats in there) close it enough to get the band off the prongs, and that’s it. The bank will cut off the circulation, to the testicles, and in a couple of weeks, they will fall off (much like a baby’s umbilical cord does.) The best thing about that method is that you don’t have the risk of infection like you would if they were cut off. He’ll just walk a little funny for a few days. :p

Ok.
Now I get the smell.

The upside, he is already trying to service two of the girls.
This is what we bought him for so all is well.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:06 am


No Picture

Construction Cornerstone • Re: Hide in plain sight OR Wall around home

April 4, 2017 Cast Iron 0

Both would require serious heavy machinery.
In the woods, that machinery would leave tracks and be visible from aerial views.
Right now, on google maps, I can see my ATV tracks. I can even see the livestock, their fencing, and tell old paddocks from new ones.

If it is possible, build the walled house, then sheath it in vinyl siding and make it look like every other house built in the past twenty or so years.

Realistically comes down to cost.
Might be cheaper and more realistic to make modifications to the surroundings to make the homestead more defensible.

Traps are a bad idea. You have to know about the location of every single one of them, every time. So does the rest of the family or those members in your group. Trying to explain to the authorities how little Timmy got a shotgun blast to the face might be interesting. Post-SHTF might not be a big deal, but little Timmy might think it is.

Statistics: Posted by Cast Iron — Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:05 am