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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 26, 2017 Mollypup 0
TRex2 wrote:

Missile or no missile?

All of these scenarios assume North Korea sets off a thermonuclear device in a controlled way – via aeroplane, barge, balloon, or some kind of stationary platform.

But the risk to people also largely depends on whether or not North Korea launches a nuclear warhead on an intercontinental ballistic missile or a shorter-range rocket, such as one launched from a submarine.

If successful, such a missile test would show North Korea has miniaturised its weapons. And if the blast appears to be caused by a hydrogen bomb, it would show North Korea could pull off a devastating thermonuclear strike on US soil.

But missiles are prone to failure in multiple ways, especially those in early development. A North Korean ICBM tipped with a nuclear warhead might miss its target by a significant distance, or explode en route.

This could lead to detonation in an unintended place and altitude.

I believe this, and the possibility that the warhead itself might become a dud (rocket launches are fairly rough, it isn’t smooth like taking off in a jet airliner), are the main reasons Crazy Fat Kid is delaying attacking us.

I think you’ve pointed out why he keeps testing them perhaps. Unfortunately, we won’t know when he’s finished “testing” & attack is incoming until the last possible second.

What has me wondering is that both Hawaii & California are preparing for war. Saw an article on each & can maybe find links later in the morning. I’m just home from work & too tired to bother. That they’re preparing wasn’t much of a surprise. Unless you’re blathering idiots, you’ve got to know by now we’re just a breath away from the next global war. That they went public about it, though, surprised me a little.

Statistics: Posted by Mollypup — Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:10 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 26, 2017 Mollypup 0
TRex2 wrote:

Missile or no missile?

All of these scenarios assume North Korea sets off a thermonuclear device in a controlled way – via aeroplane, barge, balloon, or some kind of stationary platform.

But the risk to people also largely depends on whether or not North Korea launches a nuclear warhead on an intercontinental ballistic missile or a shorter-range rocket, such as one launched from a submarine.

If successful, such a missile test would show North Korea has miniaturised its weapons. And if the blast appears to be caused by a hydrogen bomb, it would show North Korea could pull off a devastating thermonuclear strike on US soil.

But missiles are prone to failure in multiple ways, especially those in early development. A North Korean ICBM tipped with a nuclear warhead might miss its target by a significant distance, or explode en route.

This could lead to detonation in an unintended place and altitude.

I believe this, and the possibility that the warhead itself might become a dud (rocket launches are fairly rough, it isn’t smooth like taking off in a jet airliner), are the main reasons Crazy Fat Kid is delaying attacking us.

I think you’ve pointed out why he keeps testing them perhaps. Unfortunately, we won’t know when he’s finished “testing” & attack is incoming until the last possible second.

What has me wondering is that both Hawaii & California are preparing for war. Saw an article on each & can maybe find links later in the morning. I’m just home from work & too tired to bother. That they’re preparing wasn’t much of a surprise. Unless you’re blathering idiots, you’ve got to know by now we’re just a breath away from the next global war. That they went public about it, though, surprised me a little.

Statistics: Posted by Mollypup — Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:10 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 26, 2017 TRex2 0
Missile or no missile?

All of these scenarios assume North Korea sets off a thermonuclear device in a controlled way – via aeroplane, barge, balloon, or some kind of stationary platform.

But the risk to people also largely depends on whether or not North Korea launches a nuclear warhead on an intercontinental ballistic missile or a shorter-range rocket, such as one launched from a submarine.

If successful, such a missile test would show North Korea has miniaturised its weapons. And if the blast appears to be caused by a hydrogen bomb, it would show North Korea could pull off a devastating thermonuclear strike on US soil.

But missiles are prone to failure in multiple ways, especially those in early development. A North Korean ICBM tipped with a nuclear warhead might miss its target by a significant distance, or explode en route.

This could lead to detonation in an unintended place and altitude.

I believe this, and the possibility that the warhead itself might become a dud (rocket launches are fairly rough, it isn’t smooth like taking off in a jet airliner), are the main reasons Crazy Fat Kid is delaying attacking us.

Statistics: Posted by TRex2 — Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:18 am


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General California Discussion, News and Weather • Re: What to do if the SHTF and I am out…..way out.

September 26, 2017 PatrioticStabilist 0

I remember when hubs worked half way around the world for 15 years, I worried about that.
We pretty much concluded if something really serious happened he likely could never make
it back though he would try. I would have been on my own. He would have been with a group
of expats and they likely would be pretty resourceful but big limits too on what they could do.

Statistics: Posted by PatrioticStabilist — Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:17 am


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Virginia Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Prepping Fatigue?

September 26, 2017 PatrioticStabilist 0

I pray son gets out of there before it hits but don’t think he can, they have pushed
his leave date to almost a week or two before he is to report to his duty station
in the US in January. I’m scared sh****less, though I’m trying not to let on to him.
He is only 12 miles from the north.

He is also civilian and being replaced by military but they don’t want to let him
leave.

Statistics: Posted by PatrioticStabilist — Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:07 am


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Nebraska Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Prepping Fatigue?

September 26, 2017 kappydell 0

Us real preppers never stop; we incorporate it into our lifestyle. I must admit though, I do get tired of the constant sales pitches to try to sell prepper ‘stuff’ instead of the how-to info I used to see so much more of. Oh well.
I keep preppin’ regardless. There is ALWAYS something that occurs where prepping is a godsend – it does not have to be a cataclysm, a simple family emergency is enough. My prep have carried me comfortably through sudden job losses, catastrophic illnesses, huge storms causing 6 wks without electricity, and have also been a source of care packages to friends in need. So ‘keep calm & prep on” has been a way of life for decades now. Real preppers don’t need an ‘excuse’ to prep….life itself is reason enough!

Statistics: Posted by kappydell — Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:01 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 26, 2017 ReadyMom 0

This is frightening:

Here’s What Could Happen if North Korea Sets Off a Nuclear Explosion in The Pacific
http://www.sciencealert.com/here-s-what … he-pacific

24 SEP 2017

North Korea may be planning one of the most powerful nuclear explosions in history.

Ring Yong Ho, the foreign minister of the isolated nation, reportedly told journalists that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is considering such a test blast.

“It could be the most powerful detonation of an H-bomb in the Pacific,” Ri told reporters at the United Nations in New York on Thursday, according to a story by South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency.

“We have no idea about what actions could be taken as it will be ordered by leader Kim Jong Un.”

The suggestion came in response to bellicose rhetoric exchanged between US President Donald Trump and Jong Un.

In a speech before the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, Trump called Jong Un a suicidal “rocket man” and threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if the US is “forced to defend itself or its allies”.

Jong Un allegedly responded with a written statement, in which he called Trump a “mentally deranged US dotard” and said that “a frightened dog barks louder”.

Many experts have denounced Trump’s speech, suggesting his words could provoke Jong Un to take dramatic action.

“Trump is basically creating audience costs for Kim to back down,” Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, told Vox.

“If you dare Kim, it creates pressure for him to respond with his own provocation.”

North Korea has set off several powerful nuclear test blasts in recent years, but they all occurred deep inside a mountain. A nuclear explosion in the air, on the ground, underwater, or in space has not happened in decades.

If the nation sets off an above-ground nuclear explosion – and the most powerful ever detonated in the Pacific – the Cold War’s rich history of test blasts suggests what might happen.

Why atmospheric nuclear tests are dangerous

The US, Russia, China, and other countries have set off more than 2,000 nuclear test blasts since 1945.

More than 500 of these explosions occurred on soil, in space, on barges, or underwater. But most of these happened early in the Cold War – before the risks to innocent people and the environment were well-understood. (Nearly all countries now ban nuclear testing.)

The problem with nuclear test explosions is that they create radioactive fallout. Space detonations come with their own risks, including a more widespread electromagnetic pulse.

Only a fraction of a nuclear weapon’s core is turned into energy during an explosion; the rest is irradiated, melted, and turned into fine particles. This creates a small amount of fallout that can be lofted into the atmosphere and spread around.

But the risk of fallout vastly increases close to the ground or water.

There, a nuclear explosion can suck up dirt, debris, water, and other materials, creating many tons of radioactive fallout – and this material rises high into the atmosphere, where it drifts for hundreds of miles.

This kind of Cold War-era fallout killed scores of innocent people in the Pacific, including Japanese fishermen, and is still causing cancer and health problems around the world today.

Where and how big?

Ri did not specify where or how high its hypothetical Pacific “H-bomb” test might occur. However, the foreign minister did reportedly suggest it could be the most powerful ever detonated in the Pacific.

If this is not a matter of imprecise wording, it would mean the hypothetical blast would exceed the US’ strongest nuclear test ever.

On March 1, 1954, the US military set off the “Shrimp” thermonuclear device on a platform in the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands (about 2,300 miles (3,700 km) southeast of Japan and 2,700 miles (4,350 km) southwest of Hawaii).

This was part of the US military’s Castle Bravo test series, and the blast was equivalent to exploding 15 million tons of TNT, or roughly 1,000 times as powerful the US attack on Hiroshima that inflicted some 150,000 casualties.

While the military considered Shrimp and Bravo a success, its repercussions were disastrous.

Researchers underestimated the device’s explosive power by nearly three-fold – and many were nearly killed when an artificial earthquake shook their concrete observation bunker 20 miles away.

Author and film producer Eric Schlosser, writing in his book Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety, captures the raw power of the blast through the perspective of scientist Bernard O’Keefe:

“About ten seconds after Shrimp exploded, the underground bunker seemed to be moving. But that didn’t make any sense. The concrete bunker was anchored to the island, and the walls were three feet thick.

“‘Is this building moving or am I getting dizzy?’ another scientist asked. ‘My God, it is,’ O’Keefe said. ‘It’s moving!’

“O’Keefe began to feel nauseated, as though he were seasick, and held on to a workbench as objects slid around the room. The bunker was rolling and shaking, he later recalled, ‘like it was resting on a bowl of jelly.’ The shock wave from the explosion, travelling through the ground, had reached them faster than the blast wave passing through the air.”

The scientists ultimately escaped alive, but Marshall Islanders located 100 miles from the blast were not so lucky.

Shrimp’s four-mile-wide fireball vaporised about 200 billion tons of Bikini Atoll coral reef, turning much of it into radioactive fallout that spread all over the world. The worst of it sprinkled over atolls to the east, killing many people from radiation sickness.

Today, the 250-foot-deep (76 metre deep), 1-mile-wide (1.6 km wide) crater left by the blast is visible from space.

If North Korea decides to blow up a hydrogen or thermonuclear device – and the most powerful in the Pacific – we could only hope it is not close to the ground.

Missile or no missile?

All of these scenarios assume North Korea sets off a thermonuclear device in a controlled way – via aeroplane, barge, balloon, or some kind of stationary platform.

But the risk to people also largely depends on whether or not North Korea launches a nuclear warhead on an intercontinental ballistic missile or a shorter-range rocket, such as one launched from a submarine.

If successful, such a missile test would show North Korea has miniaturised its weapons. And if the blast appears to be caused by a hydrogen bomb, it would show North Korea could pull off a devastating thermonuclear strike on US soil.

But missiles are prone to failure in multiple ways, especially those in early development. A North Korean ICBM tipped with a nuclear warhead might miss its target by a significant distance, or explode en route.

This could lead to detonation in an unintended place and altitude.

This is especially true if the missile has no self-destruct capability – ICBMs maintained by the US don’t. In that case, only hacking the missile’s software in mid-air, or destroying it with another weapon, could stop the launch.

“The stakes and heat in this conflict have not been this high since the Korean War,” Tristan Webb, a senior analyst for NK News, said in a story published by the outlet on Friday.

“Kim Jong Un said in July that the … showdown was entering its final phase. He appears psychologically prepared for conflict.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:29 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: 2017 SEPTEMBER – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month

September 26, 2017 IceFire 0

Hauled the Husky pup in to the vet this evening to get her rattlesnake vaccine “booster.” While the vaccine does NOT eliminate the need for antivenin treatment if they get bitten, what it DOES do is reduce the SYMPTOMS (pain, swelling, and tissue damage), and gives them a little more TIME, and therefore a better chance of survival. Something to consider for those living in “rattlesnake country.”

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:16 pm


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: 2017 SEPTEMBER – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month

September 26, 2017 IceFire 0

Hauled the Husky pup in to the vet this evening to get her rattlesnake vaccine “booster.” While the vaccine does NOT eliminate the need for antivenin treatment if they get bitten, what it DOES do is reduce the SYMPTOMS (pain, swelling, and tissue damage), and gives them a little more TIME, and therefore a better chance of survival. Something to consider for those living in “rattlesnake country.”

Statistics: Posted by IceFire — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:16 pm


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General California Discussion, News and Weather • Re: What to do if the SHTF and I am out…..way out.

September 26, 2017 mizery0317 0

There’s a couple of different things you can do to make the commute more prepper efficient.
1. Place caches I understand the concrete jungle not the most ideal place but I’m sure there is something you can do. Park or something similar.
2. Plan and plan thoroughly you definitely are doing a bug out level movement, which can be done. Plan how many miles you can cover in a day/night and be realistic about it. Also look into maybe a good bike or some sort of compact device to cover more ground.
3. As far as your cross country plan, you need to start thoroughly networking my longer term bug out plan also takes me cross country so I am currently networking to make that more feasible.
-loved the post really got me thinking so thank you, also thanks everyone for the responses already posted.

Statistics: Posted by mizery0317 — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:16 pm


No Picture

General California Discussion, News and Weather • Re: What to do if the SHTF and I am out…..way out.

September 26, 2017 mizery0317 0

There’s a couple of different things you can do to make the commute more prepper efficient.
1. Place caches I understand the concrete jungle not the most ideal place but I’m sure there is something you can do. Park or something similar.
2. Plan and plan thoroughly you definitely are doing a bug out level movement, which can be done. Plan how many miles you can cover in a day/night and be realistic about it. Also look into maybe a good bike or some sort of compact device to cover more ground.
3. As far as your cross country plan, you need to start thoroughly networking my longer term bug out plan also takes me cross country so I am currently networking to make that more feasible.
-loved the post really got me thinking so thank you, also thanks everyone for the responses already posted.

Statistics: Posted by mizery0317 — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:16 pm


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General Food Topics • Re: Six year-old powdered milk!

September 26, 2017 Kilo_11 0

So to update: we’re on our third week of delicious 6-year old powdered milk and I couldn’t be happier with my preps. We’re drinking it normally, going through about 2-3 quarts a day which is the standard amount of milk my family drinks.

A few bullet points:
– I stored eight quart-sized bags to a bucket and I just opened the 4th bag tonight. That’s at least 6 weeks to a Home Depot bucket under normal intake. Good to know.
– The bags were packed with oxygen absorbers, two to a bag, and the bags come out rock-hard until you break the seal… as if they had been vacuum-packed
– So far we haven’t been poisoned by free radicals or had any ill effects. If nothing else my daughters drink more milk since the novelty hasn’t worn off.

So my answer to some of the debate on this thread is this: Yes it’s scientific fact that food degrades over time. I think the smell and taste test are reasonable to root out whether its fit for consumption. Though I like my food fresh, I’m not prepping so that I can feed hundreds of dollars of preps, not to mention storage time and effort, to chickens and dogs because I’m picky. I said for 21 years as a Paratrooper in the US Army, you train like you fight. Periodically rotating your preps out is never a bad idea. I’m a little later than I planned with the milk but this is valuable information and a satisfying test of our preparations.

Statistics: Posted by Kilo_11 — Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:33 pm


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Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters

September 25, 2017 gman 0

Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters By H. Davis Technology is starting to dominate many aspects of the emergency planning profession. This is particularly true during a disaster response. Since the dawn of man, there have been countless natural disasters responsible for taking lives and causing chaos throughout cities. … Continue reading Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters

The post Emergency Management: How Technology Can Impact the Way We Prepare for Disasters appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 25, 2017 oldasrocks 0

No fence is going to keep out Squirrels, birds, mice, rats or snakes or moles and chipmunks which dig under. Much less Asian beetles which do more damage than animals.
I’m studying the cost of a hoop house covered with 1/8″ holed hail screen to keep out the beetles. The ate everything this year.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:23 pm


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General Homesteading Topics • Re: Fence to Keep Out Critters

September 25, 2017 oldasrocks 0

No fence is going to keep out Squirrels, birds, mice, rats or snakes or moles and chipmunks which dig under. Much less Asian beetles which do more damage than animals.
I’m studying the cost of a hoop house covered with 1/8″ holed hail screen to keep out the beetles. The ate everything this year.

Statistics: Posted by oldasrocks — Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:23 pm


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Washington Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Its a mistake….

September 25, 2017 daaswampman 0
DR1VENbyKNOWLEDGE wrote:
Right there with ya….lessons learned.

As Angie said, moving is the only real solution…anything else at this point results in zombies at the door.

Stashing your stuff might save you some loss but they’ll still be coming. desperation when nothing found will lead to further violence. So IF you survive it, sure, there’s supplies to fall back on.

I went with a combination of going grey, stashing and displaying hard target.

The cats outa the bag, cant put it back, so I decided to make myself a very visible hard target until we actually move. Verbally and visible. AR’s in full site going to the range every weekend for practice, 1000 rounds visible at purchase, Very frank talks with neighbors of training every weekend for long range and CQB training with vets and local sheriffs that have formed a network(Happens to be true)…..Discussions of how(And this actually happened) a work associate stated to me “They don’t need to prep, He’ll just show up at my front door if SHTF…ha, ha, ha”…..And how I told him very seriously I answered “If SHTF and anyone shows up at my door for anything that they will be met with the wrong end of a barrel by multiple Vets and myself…No one would be allowed in and no extra food will be available to leave and bodies on the lawn will help us deter the next door knocker.”………..

This was stated to the nosey neighbor that often offers his un-asked opinion on the neighborhood goings-on in day to day conversations……I know my message got out when another prepped neighbor told me he heard about the conversation….lol……he also heard from same said neighbor that I had sold my stuff(Food) as I was in financial hardship…lol…another white lie.

Truth is, nothing short of moving will fix this….But, hard target ideology will deter all but the most desperate and if it comes to that, neighbors would be hit first(softer targets), and then they’ll hit you after all others have been hit and they were going to hit you eventually anyways…..With enough time passing in a SHTF it’s inevitable whether you’re known as a prepper or not so better be prepped for that as well.

Anyone here can disagree but no one will state anything other than opinion since it’s not happened yet in the US……This is the route I chose. It doesn’t matter since the cats outa the bag and can never be put back in.

Best solution if you ever open your big fat mouth is to move….The only real security is to never open said mouth to begin with……
If you already have, like the dumb-asss that I was, broadcast :tank::gunsmile::gunshooting::gunsmile:hard target :gunsmile::gunshooting::gunsmile::tank: until you move.

We still wave to each other but the prepping jokes stopped immediately. ;)

my $.02

~D

You can have it both ways, but it is going to cost you! I am very open about storm preparation, have a large shelter, teach a local class, and am willing to help others get started.

The camp is never discussed with anyone, especially family. The master plan is simple. If things are not too bad I will stay and help everyone I can. Beyond that, I will walk away and let them have it.

Your first prep is yourself! Can you keep a secret and never tell anyone? Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:34 pm


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Check In Here Virginia Preppers • Re: Virgnina Preppers Roll Call 1/15/2012

September 25, 2017 Fishman 0

Hello, Virginians.

Checking in for the first time.

I go by the callsign/nickname “Fish”. I am from the Hampton Roads, Virginia area aka the “757”. Looking to meet other like minded individuals. Id like to get a steady group of people together for bushcraft, hiking and survival training. I look forward to meeting you all.

-Fish

Statistics: Posted by Fishman — Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:51 pm


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea crisis in 300 words
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-40871848

The North Korean stand-off is a crisis that, at worst, threatens nuclear war, but it’s complicated. Let’s take a step back.
Why does North Korea want nuclear weapons?

The Korean peninsula was divided after World War Two and the communist North developed into a Stalinesque dictatorship.

Almost entirely isolated on the global stage, its leaders say nuclear capabilities are its only deterrent against an outside world seeking to destroy it.

How close are they?

North Korea claims it has successfully tested a hydrogen bomb – many times more powerful than an atomic bomb – that can be miniaturised and loaded on a long-range missile.

State media called the test “a perfect success”, and although analysts said the claims should be treated with caution, leaked information suggests US intelligence officials do believe North Korea is capable of miniaturisation.

Pyongyang views the US as its main adversary but also has rockets aimed at South Korea and Japan, where thousands of US troops are based.

What has been done to stop them?

Attempts to negotiate aid-for-disarmament deals have repeatedly failed.

The UN has implemented increasingly tough sanctions – to little effect. China, the North’s only real ally, has also put economic and diplomatic pressure on the North.

The US has now threatened military force.

Is it for real this time?

The crisis has been brewing for years, but is at a new level now.

The US is within reach of a strike now, which coupled with the miniaturisation is a game changer. And over the summer, North Korea has grown increasingly provocative, threatening the US Pacific territory of Guam and Japan.

The US responded to the latest test by saying its patience is “not unlimited” and it was ready to respond militarily.

Never has the rhetoric exchanged been more incendiary and personal, and experts are increasingly alarmed.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:27 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea-US tensions: How worried should you be?
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-40882877

24 September 2017

The US president has threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea if his country is forced to defend itself or its allies.

North Korea, meanwhile, has conducted its sixth nuclear test, threatened to fire off missiles towards the US island territory of Guam and said it might test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean.

And all this comes amid reports that Pyongyang may have finally succeeded in miniaturising a nuclear weapon that could fit on an inter-continental missile – a prospect long-dreaded by the US and its Asian allies.

Is this a precursor to military conflict?

Experts say you should not panic – just yet. This is why:

1. Nobody wants war

This is one of the most important things to keep in mind. A war on the Korean peninsula serves no-one’s interests.

The North Korean government’s main goal is survival – and direct conflict with the US would seriously jeopardise it. As BBC defence correspondent Jonathan Marcus notes, any North Korean attack against the US or its allies in the current context could quickly spiral into a wider war – and we have to assume the Kim Jong-un government is not suicidal.

In fact, this is why North Korea has been trying so hard to become a nuclear-armed power. Having this capability, it reasons, would protect the government by raising the costs of toppling it. Kim Jong-un does not want to go the way of Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi or Iraq’s Saddam Hussein.

Andrei Lankov of Kookmin University in Seoul told the UK’s Guardian newspaper there was “very little probability of conflict” but North Koreans were equally “not interested in diplomacy” at this point.

“They want to get the ability to wipe out Chicago from the map first, and then they will be interested in diplomatic solutions,” Mr Lankov said.

What about a pre-emptive US strike?

The US knows that a strike on North Korea would force the government there to retaliate against US allies South Korea and Japan.

This would result in a massive loss of life, including the deaths of thousands of Americans – troops and civilians.

Additionally, Washington does not want to risk any nuclear-tipped missiles being fired off towards the US mainland.

Finally, China – Pyongyang’s only ally – has helped to prop up the North Korean government precisely because its collapse is deemed to be a strategically worse outcome. US and South Korean troops just across the Chinese border is a prospect that Beijing does not want to have to face – and that is what war would bring.
2. What you are seeing are words, not actions

President Trump might have threatened North Korea with language uncommon for a US president but this does not mean the US is actively moving on to a war footing.

As one anonymous US military official told Reuters news agency back in August: “Just because the rhetoric goes up, doesn’t mean our posture changes.”

New York Times columnist Max Fisher agrees: “These are the sorts of signals, not a leader’s offhand comments, that matter most in international relations.”

What is more, after North Korea’s sixth nuclear test in early September and missile tests over Japan, the US has reverted to a tried and true tactic: squeezing Pyongyang through UN Security Council and unilateral sanctions.

And its diplomats are still speaking hopefully of returning to the negotiating table – pointing to support from China and Russia.

These send conflicting signals to Pyongyang but also moderate the tough rhetoric coming from President Trump.

Still, some analysts say a misinterpreted move in the current tense environment could lead to an accidental war. And it is worth noting that US bombers have recently flown close to North Korea in a show of force.

“There could be a power outage in North Korea that they mistake as a part of a pre-emptive attack. The United States might make a mistake on the [Demilitarised Zone],” Daryl Kimball, of US think tank Arms Control Association, told the BBC. “So there are various ways in which each side can miscalculate and the situation escalates out of control”.

3. We have been here before

As former US Assistant Secretary of State PJ Crowley points out, the US and North Korea came close to armed conflict in 1994, when Pyongyang refused to allow international inspectors into its nuclear facilities. Diplomacy won out.

Over the years, North Korea has regularly made incendiary threats against the US, Japan and South Korea, several times threatening to turn Seoul into a “sea of fire”.

And Mr Trump’s rhetoric – in content, if not style – is also not exactly unprecedented from a US president.

“In many different forms, albeit not as colourful, the US has always said that if North Korea ever attacks, the regime will cease to exist,” Mr Crowley writes.

The difference this time, he adds, is the US president has appeared to suggest he might take pre-emptive action (though Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has played this down.)

This kind of unpredictable, bellicose rhetoric coming from the White House is unusual and does have people worried, analysts say.

South Korea – the US ally with the most to lose from a confrontation with the North – has called for a cooling of rhetoric from both Pyongyang and the White House.

No one wants Kim Jong-un to think an attack might be imminent.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:26 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

:o:o:o

North Korea accuses US of declaring war
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-41391978

North Korea’s foreign minister has accused US President Donald Trump of declaring war on his country.

Ri Yong-ho told reporters in New York that North Korea reserved the right to shoot down US bombers.

This applied even when they were not in North Korean airspace, the minister added. The world “should clearly remember” it was the US that first declared war, Mr Ri said.

The two sides have been engaged in an increasingly angry war of words.

Despite weeks of tension, experts have played down the risk of direct conflict between the two.

After Mr Ri addressed the United Nations on Saturday, the US president responded by tweeting that Mr Ri and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “won’t be around much longer” if they continued their rhetoric.

Mr Ri’s response came as he was leaving New York, following the UN General Assembly.

“In light of the declaration of war by Trump, all options will be on the operations table of the supreme leadership of the DPRK [North Korea],” he added.

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N. If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won’t be around much longer!
11:08 PM – Sep 23, 2017

North Korea has continued to carry out nuclear and ballistic missile tests in recent weeks, in defiance of successive rounds of UN sanctions.

The country’s leaders say nuclear capabilities are its only deterrent against an outside world seeking to destroy it.

After the North’s latest and most powerful nuclear test earlier this month, the UN Security Council approved new sanctions on the country.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:23 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Trump Will Not Strike North Korea Because Pyongyang Can Hit Back, Unlike Iraq, Says Russia
http://www.newsweek.com/trump-will-not- … sia-670364

9/25/17

The U.S. won’t take on North Korea by force, Russia’s top diplomat has said, because Pyongyang has weapons that would posed a credible retaliatory threat.

Pointing to the end of Saddam Hussein’s regime, Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told the state-run NTV channel the U.S. only invaded Iraq after being totally sure that the country could not hit back, and the knowledge that North Korea can do so will prevent action from Washington.

Speaking about the budding crisis around the Korean peninsula, where the North has demonstrated numerous times this summer that it is both expanding the range of its missiles and the intensity of its nuclear detonation abilities, Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov harked back to 2003 invasion.

Part of the justification for the operation in Iraq was the allegation by the U.S. and U.K. that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction. However, Lavrov suggested the U.S. knew there were no such weapons, that the U.S. “struck entirely because they had 100 percent information that there were no weapons of mass destruction there.”

The U.S. deployed troops to Iraq and did not hit use any weapons of mass destruction of its own.

“The Americans will not hit North Korea because they not only suspect but they know that [North Korea] has a nuclear bomb,” Lavrov told his interviewer. “I am not defending North Korea right now, I am only saying that practically everyone agrees with this analysis.”

Should the tensions on the Korean Peninsula escalate into conflict with targeted strikes, Lavrov said “tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands” of innocent civilians in North and South Korea, as well as possibly Japan and elsewhere would suffer.

Lavrov spoke in response to the mounting war of words between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea’s state media, with a particular highlight of the feud coming during Trump’s first address to the U.N. General Assembly. In his address Trump doubled down on his nuclear warnings to Pyongyang, telling North Korean leader Kim Jong-un that he is “rocket man on a suicide mission.”

Although Russia and China supported the last U.S. drafted batch of sanctions on Pyongyang, earlier this month, Moscow and Beijing oppose further action against the regime that does not involve diplomatic talks.

In principle both countries object to North Korea’s nuclear proliferation goals, however, Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to move toward acceptance that Pyongyang achieving nuclear capabilities was inevitable earlier this month.

He told reporters that no amount of sanctions would curb Pyongyang’s program as North Koreans would “eat grass” before they gave up on their militarization.

Russia and China finished the second stage of their joint naval drill in Pacific waters near the Korean peninsula on Monday, drafting over a dozen ships in it.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:21 am


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Introduce Yourself • Re: New Members, Welcome to our forum!

September 25, 2017 Fishman 0

Hi!

I go by the callsign/nickname “Fish”

I am from the Hampton Roads, Virginia area aka the “757”. Looking for a local group to meet other like minded individuals. Id like to get a steady group of people together for bushcraft, hiking and survival training. I look forward to meeting you all.

-Fish

Statistics: Posted by Fishman — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:56 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Trump: North Korean leaders ‘won’t be around much longer’ if they strike US
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/09/24 … ke-us.html

September 24 2017

If North Korea’s foreign minister hoped to draw a response from U.S. President Donald Trump with his Saturday speech to the U.N. General Assembly, he succeeded.

“Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N.,” the president tweeted late Saturday. “If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won’t be around much longer!”

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N. If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won’t be around much longer!
11:08 PM – Sep 23, 2017

The president was referring to Ri Yong Ho, who on Saturday called Trump “a mentally deranged person full of megalomania,” and promised that a strike on the U.S. mainland was “inevitable.”

“Little Rocket Man” was Trump’s now-infamous label for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

With his tweet, Trump seemed to reiterate a previous asserton that any strike by North Korea against the U.S. or its allies would be met with an overwhelming response.

The address by Ri in New York City began as the Pentagon announced it had flown bombers and fighter escorts to the farthest point north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone by any such American aircraft this century.

“This mission is a demonstration of U.S. resolve and a clear message that the president has many military options to defeat any threat,” Defense Department spokesman Dana White said in a statement.

“North Korea’s weapons program is a grave threat to the Asia-Pacific region and the entire international community. We are prepared to use the full range of military capabilities to defend the U.S. homeland and our allies,” White said.

The Pentagon said B-1B bombers from Guam, along with F-15C Eagle fighter escorts from Okinawa, Japan, flew in international airspace over waters east of North Korea on Saturday. Unlike on previous so-called “show of force” missions, the U.S. aircraft were not accompanied by South Korean or Japanese planes.

“While conducted unilaterally, this mission was coordinated with regional allies – namely the Republic of Korea and Japan – and was a strong testament to our ironclad alliance,” U.S. Pacific Command spokesman Cmdr. Dave Benham told Fox News, using the official name for South Korea.

B-1 bombers are no longer part of the U.S. nuclear force, but they are capable of dropping large numbers of conventional bombs.

U.S. Pacific Command would not be more specific about many years it had been since U.S. bombers and fighters had flown that far north of the DMZ, but Benham noted that this century “encompasses the period North Korea has been testing ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons.”

At the United Nations, Ri said that his country’s nuclear force is “to all intents and purposes, a war deterrent for putting an end to nuclear threat of the U.S. and for preventing its military invasion, and our ultimate goal is to establish the balance of power with the U.S.”

He also said that Trump’s depiction of Kim as “Rocket Man” makes “our rocket’s visit to the entire U.S. mainland inevitable all the more.”

Trump on Friday had renewed his rhetorical offensive against Kim.

“Kim Jong Un of North Korea, who is obviously a madman who doesn’t mind starving or killing his people, will be tested like never before!” the president tweeted.

On Thursday, Trump announced more economic sanctions against the impoverished and isolated country, targeting foreign companies that deal with the North.

“North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile development is a grave threat to peace and security in our world and it is unacceptable that others financially support this criminal, rogue regime,” Trump said as he joined Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in for a meeting in New York.

Hours later, Kim responded by saying Trump was “deranged” and vowed the president would “pay dearly” for threatening to “totally destroy” North Korea if the U.S. was forced to defend itself or its allies against an attack.

In a speech last week at the United Nations, Trump had issued the warning of potential obliteration and mocked the North’s young autocrat as a “Rocket Man” on a “suicide mission.”

Trump’s executive order expanded the Treasury Department’s ability to target anyone conducting significant trade in goods, services or technology with North Korea, and to ban them from interacting with the U.S. financial system.

Trump also said China was imposing major banking sanctions, too, but there was no immediate confirmation from the North’s most important trading partner.

If enforced, the Chinese action Trump described could severely impede the isolated North’s ability to raise money for its missile and nuclear development. China, responsible for about 90 percent of North Korea’s trade, serves as the country’s conduit to the international banking system.

North Korea has said it intends to build a missile capable of striking all parts of the United States with a nuclear bomb. Trump has said he won’t allow it, although the U.S. so far has not used military force to impede the North’s progress.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:51 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

U.S.-North Korea dispute will end in war if China doesn’t intervene: Ralph Peters
https://finance.yahoo.com/video/u-north … 16662.html

September 22, 2017

Retired Lt. Col. Ralph Peters discusses the most recent threat from North Korea, which on Friday said it might test a nuclear bomb over the Pacific Ocean.

VIDEO at this link …..

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:48 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

North Korea’s latest threat to the US was unlike any other from the country
http://www.businessinsider.com/north-ko … omb-2017-9

Sep. 21, 2017

North Korea’s warning to President Donald Trump and the US on Thursday certainly included the country’s usual fiery rhetoric, but underneath its superfluous metaphors it may have been signaling a more personal message.

The statement, which called Trump “a frightened dog” and a “dotard,” was delivered by Kim Jong Un himself, and it even included a picture of the North Korean leader sitting behind a desk, apparently reading from the statement.

Though official communications from North Korea are normally filled with bellicose remarks and often met with skepticism, the country’s latest one appeared to take on a more overt personal tone, according to North Korea experts. Such a move is not typical of the country.

Kim’s statement took a jab at Trump in part by echoing critics who have rebuked Trump’s off-the-cuff remarks in the early months of his presidency.

Describing Trump’s Tuesday appearance before the UN General Assembly, Kim said: “I expected he would make stereotyped, prepared remarks a little different from what he used to utter in his office on the spur of the moment as he had to speak on the world’s biggest official diplomatic stage.

“But, far from making remarks of any persuasive power that can be viewed to be helpful to defusing tension, he made unprecedented rude nonsense one has never heard from any of his predecessors.”

Meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Thursday, Trump doubled down and moved to impose further sanctions against North Korea on top of the UN Security Council’s recent sanctions.

During his UN speech, Trump decried North Korea’s continued provocations and said if it threatened the US, the US would “have no choice but to totally destroy” the country.

North Korea already appeared to be following through with its latest threat. Shortly after Kim made his statement, North Korean Minister of Foreign Affairs Ri Yong Ho said his country may consider testing a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean, according to South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency.

“It could be the most powerful detonation of an H-bomb in the Pacific,” Ri said. “We have no idea about what actions could be taken as it will be ordered by leader Kim Jong Un.”

It was not immediately clear whether North Korea was planning such an action. The country successfully tested what it said was a hydrogen bomb earlier this month, and it conducted another missile test days later.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:46 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Hawaii reportedly prepares for nuclear attack amid North Korea rhetoric
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/09/22/ha … toric.html

Sept 23 2017

Hawaii officials have reportedly been urging residents to prepare for a nuclear attack, the stunning plea coming amid increasingly unnerving rhetoric — and actions — from North Korea.

Aloha State authorities were working to educate and prepare residents for a possible atomic attack by telling them to consider preparing in the same way they’d prep for a tsunami, the Washington Post reported.

“Now it’s time to take it seriously,” Hawaii state Rep. Gene Ward, a Republican, said, “not to be an alarmist, but to be informing people.”

North Korea’s foreign minister has said the Communist nation may test a hydrogen bomb in the Pacific Ocean after dictator Kim Jong Un vowed he would take the “highest-level” action against the United States, South Korean media reported Thursday.

Ri Yong Ho made the comments on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York, the Yonhap news agency reported.

“We have no idea about what actions could be taken as it will be ordered by leader Kim Jong Un,” Yonhap quoted Ri as saying.

Such a test would be considered a major provocation by the U.S., South Korea and Japan. Ri was scheduled to address the U.N. General Assembly on Saturday, a day later than previously scheduled.

Ri’s comments followed Kim’s extraordinary statement lashing out at President Trump, calling the American leader “deranged” and vowing that Trump would “pay dearly” for his threat to destroy North Korea.

Kim’s first-person statement was published by North Korea’s state propaganda arm in response to Trump’s fiery speech at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday. South Korean media called it the first such direct address to the world by Kim.

Kim Dong-yub, a former South Korean military official who is now an analyst at Seoul’s Institute for Far Eastern Studies, said Kim’s statement indicated that North Korea would respond to Trump with its most aggressive missile test yet. That might include firing a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile over Japan to a range of around 4,349 miles, to display a capability to reach Hawaii or Alaska.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:45 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #6 (Sept 2017)

September 25, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Several videos at this link:

Electromagnetic pulse threat from North Korea
http://www.9news.com.au/world/2017/09/1 … orth-korea

VIDEO: Retired Navy SEAL breaks down threat of EMP attack

While the world has been fixated on North Korea’s growing nuclear missile arsenal, the rogue state’s threats against the West now include a weapon that can take down a country’s electricity grid.

In a rare reference this month, North Korea’s state news agency touched on its ability to carry out an electromagnetic pulse, or EMP, attack.

The weapon, Pyongyang said, “is a multifunctional thermonuclear nuke with great destructive power which can be detonated even at high altitudes for super-powerful EMP attack”.

Sydney-based security expert Euan Graham, of the Lowy Institute for International Policy, told Nine.com.au an EMP strike would be triggered by the detonation of a nuclear weapon tens or hundreds of kilometres above the earth.

“Electromagnetic waves from the nuclear explosion would generate pulses to swamp the electric grid and electronic devices over the target area,” he explained.

                VIDEO

Dr Graham explained its potential was realised in the 1950s and 1960s by American hydrogen bomb testing.

In one Pacific test, in 1962, the lights went out in Honolulu, almost 2000 kilometres from the blast site.

To that end, an EMP is more a weapon of mass disruption than one of mass destruction: such a weapon would not directly kill people or turn buildings to rubble.

But its effect on a heavily technology-dependent society such as the US or Japan would be potentially devastating.

Outages would likely last for months, crippling electricity supply and leaving hospitals and other critical infrastructure with power.

                VIDEO

Emergency workers couldn’t function normally, and people could run short of food and water supplies.

Alarm bells about an EMP’s threat were raised in a 2008 report by the US Congress.

It warned an attack “can hold our society at risk of catastrophic consequences”.

Just as alarming is the apparent low-tech delivery of an EMP weapon.

“Even a balloon-lofted warhead detonated at 30 kilometres altitude could blackout the [US] Eastern Grid that supports most of the population and generates 75 percent of US electricity,” William Graham, chairman of the US congressional commission, wrote in an article published by 38 North website.

But Dr Graham strikes a note of caution.

                VIDEO

He told Nine.com.au an EMP is not the priority weapon for North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un.

“It’s not their first priority. They are more concerned about building a belts and braces nuclear strike force to deter the US.”

But Dr Graham says the biggest hurdle to North Korea deploying an EMP is the retaliation it would attract.

The US would regard any EMP detonation above it as a nuclear strike.

“Nuclear use is nuclear use,” he explained.

And the consequences for North Korea could be catastrophic.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:43 am