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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 ForwardPreppers 0

We, too, have reached out to learn our new community. I agree that locals will reach out to connect with their neighbors when the time comes. Some folks don’t believe in that and see locals as threats. I think it’s to your advantage as a prepper or as a group to blend in to a certain degree with your new environment whether that’s where you live full time or if it’s a part time BOL. I don’t want to be seen as an outsider after an event when you will need some alliances.
I’ve heard of groups but have not seen one that is truly successful- I would love to hear from one. In SC it was an OPSEC issue as to why you didn’t hear a lot of talk, maybe that’s the case all over.

Mrs FP

Statistics: Posted by ForwardPreppers — Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:49 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 ForwardPreppers 0

We, too, have reached out to learn our new community. I agree that locals will reach out to connect with their neighbors when the time comes. Some folks don’t believe in that and see locals as threats. I think it’s to your advantage as a prepper or as a group to blend in to a certain degree with your new environment whether that’s where you live full time or if it’s a part time BOL. I don’t want to be seen as an outsider after an event when you will need some alliances.
I’ve heard of groups but have not seen one that is truly successful- I would love to hear from one. In SC it was an OPSEC issue as to why you didn’t hear a lot of talk, maybe that’s the case all over.

Mrs FP

Statistics: Posted by ForwardPreppers — Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:49 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: JULY 2017 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

July 31, 2017 ForwardPreppers 0

After the tomato canning marathon of July, we decided to purchase a SS canner. We may can outside next year and have 2 canners going.

We joined COSTCO over the weekend and restocked a few preps. We had a SAMs membership in SC and it’s been over a year since we shopped at a warehouse store. I also wrote down a few prices so I can judge if it’s a good deal to purchase there or from an online source.

We’ve been cleaning out the garden of spent plants. I still have a few things producing.

Raised the chicken feeder as the birds are growing. Made some climbing branches for them play on. They’re snacking on end of season cucumbers and tomatoes.

Mrs FP

Statistics: Posted by ForwardPreppers — Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:37 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: JULY 2017 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

July 31, 2017 ForwardPreppers 0

After the tomato canning marathon of July, we decided to purchase a SS canner. We may can outside next year and have 2 canners going.

We joined COSTCO over the weekend and restocked a few preps. We had a SAMs membership in SC and it’s been over a year since we shopped at a warehouse store. I also wrote down a few prices so I can judge if it’s a good deal to purchase there or from an online source.

We’ve been cleaning out the garden of spent plants. I still have a few things producing.

Raised the chicken feeder as the birds are growing. Made some climbing branches for them play on. They’re snacking on end of season cucumbers and tomatoes.

Mrs FP

Statistics: Posted by ForwardPreppers — Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:37 pm


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Tennessee Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Update BNC Kit

July 31, 2017 3ADScout 0

Add additional NBC filters to the cache. Haven’t added anything else since I was pretty set with suits, boots and gloves. What I wave been doing is moving more equipment and supplies out to the BOL. Ammo and Food- bulky things. I think I will be taking all but 2 dosimeters (1 R and 1 m/R) to BOL.

Statistics: Posted by 3ADScout — Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:38 pm


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Tennessee Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Update BNC Kit

July 31, 2017 3ADScout 0

Add additional NBC filters to the cache. Haven’t added anything else since I was pretty set with suits, boots and gloves. What I wave been doing is moving more equipment and supplies out to the BOL. Ammo and Food- bulky things. I think I will be taking all but 2 dosimeters (1 R and 1 m/R) to BOL.

Statistics: Posted by 3ADScout — Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:38 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 NJMike 0

I haven’t really had much to say on this since it would only be conjecture.

My feeling is that a SHTF will create groups where none existed. It will test and potentially destroy groups that did exist.

The rest is just interpersonal relationships and having a common goal.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:04 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 NJMike 0

I haven’t really had much to say on this since it would only be conjecture.

My feeling is that a SHTF will create groups where none existed. It will test and potentially destroy groups that did exist.

The rest is just interpersonal relationships and having a common goal.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:04 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 kenjabroni 0

I know that we would need more help but am very hesitant to reach out to others even though there seem to be some like minded people in our area. I would hope that our kids would be around if SHTF but there is no guarantee of that with them both in the military for the next 4-5 years at least.

When we moved to this part of Texas we have tried to meet new people and go to the local outings and such but its still us being on the outside to people who have lived here all their lives. We dont do church and I know that is a huge way to get into different groups. One thing that has helped us is that my wife works at the local library now and so she has made a ton of connections and met people that would be good to know in crazy situations that could occur. We do have contacts now that we could barter or trade with now that we wouldnt have had at all without her making these connections.

I think our situation will be more community helping take care of each other and such more than any hardcore groups. There could be some out there and with OPSEC it would be hard to find them honestly. I have made a few friends and such but I work in a different town about 35-40 miles away. People do know us as part of the community now though so thats a good first step. We just have to build more in roads. I dont think to many could be totally independant like Perma, but I also think putting all your eggs into one hardcore group could backfire as well. I think having a group would be fantastic, but I also think small communities could do well as well. Of course you will always have the bad apples no matter how big or small your town is and they would definitely have to be dealt with. In SHTF im not and anyone wanting to survive any amount of time will not be a charity organization.

Statistics: Posted by kenjabroni — Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:55 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 kenjabroni 0

I know that we would need more help but am very hesitant to reach out to others even though there seem to be some like minded people in our area. I would hope that our kids would be around if SHTF but there is no guarantee of that with them both in the military for the next 4-5 years at least.

When we moved to this part of Texas we have tried to meet new people and go to the local outings and such but its still us being on the outside to people who have lived here all their lives. We dont do church and I know that is a huge way to get into different groups. One thing that has helped us is that my wife works at the local library now and so she has made a ton of connections and met people that would be good to know in crazy situations that could occur. We do have contacts now that we could barter or trade with now that we wouldnt have had at all without her making these connections.

I think our situation will be more community helping take care of each other and such more than any hardcore groups. There could be some out there and with OPSEC it would be hard to find them honestly. I have made a few friends and such but I work in a different town about 35-40 miles away. People do know us as part of the community now though so thats a good first step. We just have to build more in roads. I dont think to many could be totally independant like Perma, but I also think putting all your eggs into one hardcore group could backfire as well. I think having a group would be fantastic, but I also think small communities could do well as well. Of course you will always have the bad apples no matter how big or small your town is and they would definitely have to be dealt with. In SHTF im not and anyone wanting to survive any amount of time will not be a charity organization.

Statistics: Posted by kenjabroni — Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:55 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 ForwardPreppers 0

I saw this last night and read it to hubs. We were surprised that more folks had not weighed in on this subject. But, it is a much written and spoken about subject in the prepper arena. I do have personal experience but I’m gonna try to leave out too many personal details. :|

First off, most people are very independent and used to being in control of their own lives. Being in a group, you have to relinquish some of that control unless you’re the top dog and typically their is only one top dog. So that means a whole bunch of worker bees and only one Queen. ( use your preferred analogy). This causes all sorts of reactions from people depending on their personality and upbringing. As a whole, our society carries around ALOT of emotional baggage – this all comes flying out in a group. Most often in the form of jealousy. Oh what a wicked gem is jealousy. The root of many an evil. It causes people to back away, doing less work, it causes talking behind others back, it causes friction and ultimately causes members to leave or being asked to leave.

The other issue we have encountered is differing levels of work ethic. What one family sees as priority, others do not. Why are they doing this, why aren’t they doing that? Another issue of control. There always seems to be those that work hard and those that do not. And the guilty party (or parties) never see themselves as a problem.

Ultimately it is a vetting process that most people do not do thoroughly. I know that we didn’t. Having that experience, I would advise people to give this a lot of thought, prayer and time before you get into any kind of permanent arrangement.

The stress of a SHTF scenario will make and break groups. Who really knows how people will react when it all goes down. Those of us who find ourselves in very small, disintegrated groups, are hoping that when our family and friends all arrive that it somehow works. Otherwise it’s gonna be miserable and possibly deadly.

Mrs FP

Statistics: Posted by ForwardPreppers — Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:30 pm


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General Preparedness Discussion • Re: Groups

July 31, 2017 ForwardPreppers 0

I saw this last night and read it to hubs. We were surprised that more folks had not weighed in on this subject. But, it is a much written and spoken about subject in the prepper arena. I do have personal experience but I’m gonna try to leave out too many personal details. :|

First off, most people are very independent and used to being in control of their own lives. Being in a group, you have to relinquish some of that control unless you’re the top dog and typically their is only one top dog. So that means a whole bunch of worker bees and only one Queen. ( use your preferred analogy). This causes all sorts of reactions from people depending on their personality and upbringing. As a whole, our society carries around ALOT of emotional baggage – this all comes flying out in a group. Most often in the form of jealousy. Oh what a wicked gem is jealousy. The root of many an evil. It causes people to back away, doing less work, it causes talking behind others back, it causes friction and ultimately causes members to leave or being asked to leave.

The other issue we have encountered is differing levels of work ethic. What one family sees as priority, others do not. Why are they doing this, why aren’t they doing that? Another issue of control. There always seems to be those that work hard and those that do not. And the guilty party (or parties) never see themselves as a problem.

Ultimately it is a vetting process that most people do not do thoroughly. I know that we didn’t. Having that experience, I would advise people to give this a lot of thought, prayer and time before you get into any kind of permanent arrangement.

The stress of a SHTF scenario will make and break groups. Who really knows how people will react when it all goes down. Those of us who find ourselves in very small, disintegrated groups, are hoping that when our family and friends all arrive that it somehow works. Otherwise it’s gonna be miserable and possibly deadly.

Mrs FP

Statistics: Posted by ForwardPreppers — Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:30 pm


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Country Wisdom & Know-How

July 31, 2017 Prepper Bot 0

Price: $9.99Country Wisdom & Know-HowAuthor: The Editors of Storey Publishing’s Country Wisdom BulletinsBrand: Storey Publishing’s Country Wisdom Bullentins (EDT)Label: Black Dog & LeventhalManufacturer: Black Dog & LeventhalPublisher: Blac…

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Check In Here Wisconsin Preppers • Anyone around fox cities area prepping.

July 31, 2017 Bprep38 0

Hey new to forum, but have been prepping on and off the last 2-3 years. I Have prepped the essentials food, protection, and some medical supplies. I have a family of four, and have in depth mechanical (automotive) skills along w/ 5+ years experience of EMS at the paramedic level. Just seeing what’s out here and what other advise I could gather. I look forward to hearing from my fellow badgers.

Statistics: Posted by Bprep38 — Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:05 pm


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Check In Here Wisconsin Preppers • Anyone around fox cities area prepping.

July 31, 2017 Bprep38 0

Hey new to forum, but have been prepping on and off the last 2-3 years. I Have prepped the essentials food, protection, and some medical supplies. I have a family of four, and have in depth mechanical (automotive) skills along w/ 5+ years experience of EMS at the paramedic level. Just seeing what’s out here and what other advise I could gather. I look forward to hearing from my fellow badgers.

Statistics: Posted by Bprep38 — Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:05 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Hey new to forum from WI

July 31, 2017 Bprep38 0

Hey everybody I have been prepping on and off for the past 2-3 years, mostly because of the political climate in Washington and the debt that those snakes ran up. Anyway never mind that lol I guess I’m just looking to see if there are others in my area NE WI that I could bounce ideas off of or get advise on where to go. I have the basics food, protection, some EMS supplies. thanks for all future advise.

Statistics: Posted by Bprep38 — Mon Jul 31, 2017 1:48 pm


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Introduce Yourself • Hey new to forum from WI

July 31, 2017 Bprep38 0

Hey everybody I’m Brian and I have been prepping on and off for the past 2-3 years, mostly because of the political climate in Washington and the debt that those snakes ran up. Anyway never mind that lol I guess I’m just looking to see if there are others in my area NE WI that I could bounce ideas off of or get advise on where to go. I have the basics food, protection, some EMS supplies. thanks for all future advise.

Brian

Statistics: Posted by Bprep38 — Mon Jul 31, 2017 1:48 pm


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Tips For Walleye Fishing

July 31, 2017 gman 0

Tips For Walleye Fishing The backbone to becoming a good fisher of walleye fish needs not only the physical skill of fisheries but also the knowledge on the fish. Being able to understand your fish will not only help you in making a big catch but also in understanding the characteristics of your fish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xNJXM21y18 … Continue reading Tips For Walleye Fishing

The post Tips For Walleye Fishing appeared first on Prepper Broadcasting |Network.

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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

U.S. conducts “successful” test of THAAD anti-missile system
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/u-s-conduct … ak-alaska/

The U.S. successfully conducted a missile defense test Sunday using a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system in Alaska, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA) said in a statement.

The U.S. Air Force launched a medium-range ballistic missile over the Pacific Ocean, and the THAAD system — in Kodiak, Alaska — “detected, tracked and intercepted the target,” according to the MDA’s statement.

Sunday’s test marked the 15th successful intercept out of 15 THAAD tests, and it was carried out to collect “threat data” from an interceptor, the MDA said.

The data collected will improve the Missile Defense Agency’s “ability to stay ahead of the evolving threat,” MDA Director Lt. Gen. Sam Greaves said in the agency’s statement.

The THAAD test follows North Korea’s second test-launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), which took place late Friday night. North Korea’s first ICBM test was conducted on July 4 — a launch that former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson, described to CBS News as a “game changer” because Kim Jong Un is “basically saying to President Trump ‘come at me.'”

In direct response to both launches, two U.S. Air Force B-1 bombers flew over the Korean Peninsula over the weekend. The mission was “in response to North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear programs,” and “part of the continuing demonstration of ironclad U.S. commitment to our allies,” U.S. Pacific Air Forces said in a statement.

“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, Pacific Air Forces commander, said in the statement. “Diplomacy remains the lead; however, we have a responsibility to our allies and our nation to showcase our unwavering commitment while planning for the worst-case scenario.”

“If called upon, we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal, and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing,” he added.

Earlier this year, the U.S. installed a THAAD system in South Korea. It is now operating and can defend against North Korean missiles, the U.S. military said in May.

The THAAD weapons system is strictly for defensive measures and uses “hit-to-kill technology” to destroy targets, the MDA said.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:49 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

U.S. conducts “successful” test of THAAD anti-missile system
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/u-s-conduct … ak-alaska/

The U.S. successfully conducted a missile defense test Sunday using a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system in Alaska, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA) said in a statement.

The U.S. Air Force launched a medium-range ballistic missile over the Pacific Ocean, and the THAAD system — in Kodiak, Alaska — “detected, tracked and intercepted the target,” according to the MDA’s statement.

Sunday’s test marked the 15th successful intercept out of 15 THAAD tests, and it was carried out to collect “threat data” from an interceptor, the MDA said.

The data collected will improve the Missile Defense Agency’s “ability to stay ahead of the evolving threat,” MDA Director Lt. Gen. Sam Greaves said in the agency’s statement.

The THAAD test follows North Korea’s second test-launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), which took place late Friday night. North Korea’s first ICBM test was conducted on July 4 — a launch that former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Bill Richardson, described to CBS News as a “game changer” because Kim Jong Un is “basically saying to President Trump ‘come at me.'”

In direct response to both launches, two U.S. Air Force B-1 bombers flew over the Korean Peninsula over the weekend. The mission was “in response to North Korea’s ballistic missile and nuclear programs,” and “part of the continuing demonstration of ironclad U.S. commitment to our allies,” U.S. Pacific Air Forces said in a statement.

“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, Pacific Air Forces commander, said in the statement. “Diplomacy remains the lead; however, we have a responsibility to our allies and our nation to showcase our unwavering commitment while planning for the worst-case scenario.”

“If called upon, we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal, and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing,” he added.

Earlier this year, the U.S. installed a THAAD system in South Korea. It is now operating and can defend against North Korean missiles, the U.S. military said in May.

The THAAD weapons system is strictly for defensive measures and uses “hit-to-kill technology” to destroy targets, the MDA said.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:49 am


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Tennessee Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Update BNC Kit

July 31, 2017 NJMike 0

If it’s an all out nuclear conflict, I’m as good as ash. If it’s a single warhead attack, and they aim for but miss NYC then I’m toast too. And if NK hits a West Coast city, I will have enough warning to take reasonable precautions with what I already own. So while I do have some preps in this area, it’s one that I really have been incremental on, and instead spending more time on other areas. So no, I haven’t updated lately given the recent ratcheting of world tensions.

That said, my Potassium Iodide will be replaced soon, and I could stand to get new mask/filters. I have only a half face mask with chemical/organic vapor cartridges and really do want a full face mil spec mask and hood(s). In the detection department, I’ve got a CD V-717 that should be sent out for calibration, and I could use more radiation detection stickers. There are 3 pump sprayers to pull out from my old property and see which ones are still working well to use for decontamination. They are cheap enough that I could just replace them. And one can never have enough plastic sheeting, gloves, disposable clothes, etc.

These are mainly things I’ll be more active on once I’ve moved off the likely X that I find myself at. :nuke:

The good news is I’m no longer living a block away from an often used railroad freight line, so the possibilities of chemical exposure from a derailment/industrial accident have dropped significantly.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:47 am


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Tennessee Discussion, News and Weather • Re: Update BNC Kit

July 31, 2017 NJMike 0

If it’s an all out nuclear conflict, I’m as good as ash. If it’s a single warhead attack, and they aim for but miss NYC then I’m toast too. And if NK hits a West Coast city, I will have enough warning to take reasonable precautions with what I already own. So while I do have some preps in this area, it’s one that I really have been incremental on, and instead spending more time on other areas. So no, I haven’t updated lately given the recent ratcheting of world tensions.

That said, my Potassium Iodide will be replaced soon, and I could stand to get new mask/filters. I have only a half face mask with chemical/organic vapor cartridges and really do want a full face mil spec mask and hood(s). In the detection department, I’ve got a CD V-717 that should be sent out for calibration, and I could use more radiation detection stickers. There are 3 pump sprayers to pull out from my old property and see which ones are still working well to use for decontamination. They are cheap enough that I could just replace them. And one can never have enough plastic sheeting, gloves, disposable clothes, etc.

These are mainly things I’ll be more active on once I’ve moved off the likely X that I find myself at. :nuke:

The good news is I’m no longer living a block away from an often used railroad freight line, so the possibilities of chemical exposure from a derailment/industrial accident have dropped significantly.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:47 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Related to post, above:

US deploys supersonic bombers in show of force to North Korea
http://news.sky.com/story/boris-johnson … h-10967119

An air force general warns that the US stands ready to respond to North Korea with “rapid, lethal and overwhelming force”.

Two US bombers have been flown over the Korean Peninsula in a show of force after North Korea’s latest missile test.

The supersonic B-1 bombers took off from an airbase in Guam and were joined by Japanese and South Korean fighter jets, performing a low-pass near Seoul.

The manoeuvre came in response to an intercontinental ballistic missile test by Kim Jong Un’s regime, which experts say now puts several major US cities in firing range.

“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” said General Terrence J O’Shaughnessy, Pacific Air Forces commander.

“Diplomacy remains the lead,” he said, but added: “If called upon, we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal, and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing.”

UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson made a similar vow that Britain would stand by its ally in the face of the latest threat.

He said: “The UK strongly condemns North Korea’s second test of an intercontinental ballistic missile and calls on the regime to immediately stop all activity that breaches UN Security Council resolutions.

“The UK will stand alongside our allies and partners as we confront the growing threat North Korea poses to regional and international security. Once again North Korea shows no regard for its international obligations.

“We urge the DPRK regime to put the well-being of its own people ahead of the illegal pursuit of nuclear and ballistic missile programmes.”

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who personally supervised the launch of the missile on Friday night, said it served as a “stern warning” for the US.

It is the second ICBM launch in less than a month by the North, despite international efforts to curb the development of missile technology by the nuclear-armed authoritarian state.

US President Donald Trump said: “By threatening the world, these weapons and tests further isolate North Korea, weaken its economy, and deprive its people.

“The United States will take all necessary steps to ensure the security of the American homeland and protect our allies in the region.”

He also criticised China for not doing enough to rein in Pyongyang’s nuclear programme.

He tweeted: “I am very disappointed in China. Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just talk.

“We will no longer allow this to continue. China could easily solve this problem!”

The US military will also roll out “strategic assets” to the South, Seoul’s defence minister said.

It follows the deployment in South Korea of the US missile defence system known as THAAD, which has angered China.

Beijing’s ministry of foreign affairs said in a statement on Saturday: “China expresses serious concern about the actions of the Republic of Korea.

“China’s resolute opposition to the deployment by the USA of the THAAD system in South Korea is consistent and clear.

“The THAAD system deployment cannot solve South Korea’s security concerns, neither can it solve the problems facing the Korean peninsula.

“It will only make these problems more complicated.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:47 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Related to post, above:

US deploys supersonic bombers in show of force to North Korea
http://news.sky.com/story/boris-johnson … h-10967119

An air force general warns that the US stands ready to respond to North Korea with “rapid, lethal and overwhelming force”.

Two US bombers have been flown over the Korean Peninsula in a show of force after North Korea’s latest missile test.

The supersonic B-1 bombers took off from an airbase in Guam and were joined by Japanese and South Korean fighter jets, performing a low-pass near Seoul.

The manoeuvre came in response to an intercontinental ballistic missile test by Kim Jong Un’s regime, which experts say now puts several major US cities in firing range.

“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” said General Terrence J O’Shaughnessy, Pacific Air Forces commander.

“Diplomacy remains the lead,” he said, but added: “If called upon, we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal, and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing.”

UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson made a similar vow that Britain would stand by its ally in the face of the latest threat.

He said: “The UK strongly condemns North Korea’s second test of an intercontinental ballistic missile and calls on the regime to immediately stop all activity that breaches UN Security Council resolutions.

“The UK will stand alongside our allies and partners as we confront the growing threat North Korea poses to regional and international security. Once again North Korea shows no regard for its international obligations.

“We urge the DPRK regime to put the well-being of its own people ahead of the illegal pursuit of nuclear and ballistic missile programmes.”

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who personally supervised the launch of the missile on Friday night, said it served as a “stern warning” for the US.

It is the second ICBM launch in less than a month by the North, despite international efforts to curb the development of missile technology by the nuclear-armed authoritarian state.

US President Donald Trump said: “By threatening the world, these weapons and tests further isolate North Korea, weaken its economy, and deprive its people.

“The United States will take all necessary steps to ensure the security of the American homeland and protect our allies in the region.”

He also criticised China for not doing enough to rein in Pyongyang’s nuclear programme.

He tweeted: “I am very disappointed in China. Our foolish past leaders have allowed them to make hundreds of billions of dollars a year in trade, yet they do NOTHING for us with North Korea, just talk.

“We will no longer allow this to continue. China could easily solve this problem!”

The US military will also roll out “strategic assets” to the South, Seoul’s defence minister said.

It follows the deployment in South Korea of the US missile defence system known as THAAD, which has angered China.

Beijing’s ministry of foreign affairs said in a statement on Saturday: “China expresses serious concern about the actions of the Republic of Korea.

“China’s resolute opposition to the deployment by the USA of the THAAD system in South Korea is consistent and clear.

“The THAAD system deployment cannot solve South Korea’s security concerns, neither can it solve the problems facing the Korean peninsula.

“It will only make these problems more complicated.”

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:47 am


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Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

US, allies prepared to use ‘overwhelming force’ in North Korea, general says
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/07/30 … -says.html

Published July 30, 2017

The U.S. and its allies are prepared to use “rapid, lethal and overwhelming force,” if necessary, against North Korea, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Air Forces warned Saturday night.

The statement from Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander, came after the militaries of the U.S., South Korea and Japan spent 10 hours conducting bomber-jet drills over the Korean Peninsula.

The training mission was a response to North Korea’s recent ballistic missile launches and nuclear program, and part of the U.S. regular commitment to defending its allies in the Asia-Pacific region, the general’s statement said.

“The time for talk is over. The danger the North Korean regime poses to international peace is now clear to all,” said United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley in a statement.

Statement by Ambassador Haley on North Korea

Following North Korea’s second ICBM launch on Friday, many have asked whether the United
States will seek an emergency security Council session on Monday. Some have even misreported
that we are seeking such a session. That is mistaken.

There is no point in having an emergency session if it produces nothing of consequence. North
Korea is already subject to numerous Security Council resolutions that they violate with impunity
and that are not complied with by all UN Member States. An additional Security Council
resolution that does not significantly increase the international pressure on North Korea is of no
value. In fact, it is worse than nothing, because it sends the message tp the North Korean dictator
that the international community is unwilling to seriously challenge him. China Must decide
whether it is finally willing to take this vital step. The time for talk is over. The danger the North
Korean regime poses to international peach is no clear to all.

“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” O’Shaughnessy said.

“Diplomacy remains the lead,” he said. “However, we have a responsibility to our allies and our nation to showcase our unwavering commitment while planning for the worst-case scenario.

“If called upon,” he added, “we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing.”

North Korea conducted test launches of ICBMs on July 3 and July 28, and has claimed that its weapons can now reach the U.S. mainland.

The country’s recent actions have drawn condemnation from President Trump, and prompted U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to confer with counterparts from South Korea and Japan to develop a response, Fox News has reported.

Both Trump and Tillerson have criticized China, saying the Beijing government has failed to use its influence to discourage North Korea from developing its nuclear program, Fox News reported.

On Saturday, two U.S. Air Force B-1B bombers, under the command of U.S. Pacific Air Forces, joined counterparts from the South Korean and Japanese air forces in sequenced bilateral missions.

According to the Pentagon, the U.S. bombers took off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, then flew to Japanese airspace, where they were joined by two Koku Jieitai (Japan Air Self Defense Force) F-2 fighter jets.

The B-1s then flew over the Korean Peninsula, where they were joined by four F-15 fighter jets from the South Korean air force.

The B-1s then performed a low-pass over Osan Air Base, South Korea, before leaving South Korean airspace and returning to Guam.

Throughout the approximately 10-hour mission, the air crews practiced intercept and formation functions, enabling them to improve their combined capabilities and strengthening the long-standing military-to-military relationships in the region, the Pentagon said.

U.S. Pacific Command maintains flexible bomber and fighter capabilities in the Indo-Asia-Pacific theater, retaining the ability to quickly respond to any regional threat in order to defend the U.S. and its allies, the statement said.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:43 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

US, allies prepared to use ‘overwhelming force’ in North Korea, general says
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/07/30 … -says.html

Published July 30, 2017

The U.S. and its allies are prepared to use “rapid, lethal and overwhelming force,” if necessary, against North Korea, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Air Forces warned Saturday night.

The statement from Gen. Terrence J. O’Shaughnessy, U.S. Pacific Air Forces commander, came after the militaries of the U.S., South Korea and Japan spent 10 hours conducting bomber-jet drills over the Korean Peninsula.

The training mission was a response to North Korea’s recent ballistic missile launches and nuclear program, and part of the U.S. regular commitment to defending its allies in the Asia-Pacific region, the general’s statement said.

“The time for talk is over. The danger the North Korean regime poses to international peace is now clear to all,” said United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley in a statement.

Statement by Ambassador Haley on North Korea

Following North Korea’s second ICBM launch on Friday, many have asked whether the United
States will seek an emergency security Council session on Monday. Some have even misreported
that we are seeking such a session. That is mistaken.

There is no point in having an emergency session if it produces nothing of consequence. North
Korea is already subject to numerous Security Council resolutions that they violate with impunity
and that are not complied with by all UN Member States. An additional Security Council
resolution that does not significantly increase the international pressure on North Korea is of no
value. In fact, it is worse than nothing, because it sends the message tp the North Korean dictator
that the international community is unwilling to seriously challenge him. China Must decide
whether it is finally willing to take this vital step. The time for talk is over. The danger the North
Korean regime poses to international peach is no clear to all.

“North Korea remains the most urgent threat to regional stability,” O’Shaughnessy said.

“Diplomacy remains the lead,” he said. “However, we have a responsibility to our allies and our nation to showcase our unwavering commitment while planning for the worst-case scenario.

“If called upon,” he added, “we are ready to respond with rapid, lethal and overwhelming force at a time and place of our choosing.”

North Korea conducted test launches of ICBMs on July 3 and July 28, and has claimed that its weapons can now reach the U.S. mainland.

The country’s recent actions have drawn condemnation from President Trump, and prompted U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to confer with counterparts from South Korea and Japan to develop a response, Fox News has reported.

Both Trump and Tillerson have criticized China, saying the Beijing government has failed to use its influence to discourage North Korea from developing its nuclear program, Fox News reported.

On Saturday, two U.S. Air Force B-1B bombers, under the command of U.S. Pacific Air Forces, joined counterparts from the South Korean and Japanese air forces in sequenced bilateral missions.

According to the Pentagon, the U.S. bombers took off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, then flew to Japanese airspace, where they were joined by two Koku Jieitai (Japan Air Self Defense Force) F-2 fighter jets.

The B-1s then flew over the Korean Peninsula, where they were joined by four F-15 fighter jets from the South Korean air force.

The B-1s then performed a low-pass over Osan Air Base, South Korea, before leaving South Korean airspace and returning to Guam.

Throughout the approximately 10-hour mission, the air crews practiced intercept and formation functions, enabling them to improve their combined capabilities and strengthening the long-standing military-to-military relationships in the region, the Pentagon said.

U.S. Pacific Command maintains flexible bomber and fighter capabilities in the Indo-Asia-Pacific theater, retaining the ability to quickly respond to any regional threat in order to defend the U.S. and its allies, the statement said.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:43 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Opinion Commentary

Kim Jong Un Is Going Ballistic in More Ways Than One
https://www.wsj.com/articles/kim-jong-u … 1501446238

North Korea has developed advanced short-range weapons and is almost certain to export them.

By Henry Sokolski and
Zachary Keck
July 30, 2017 4:23 p.m. ET
26 COMMENTS

Among the many types of missiles North Korea is perfecting is a short-range system that Kim Jong Un is almost certain to export. Although not as worrisome as the intercontinental ballistic missile Pyongyang tested last Friday, this weapon has a highly accurate front end optimized to knock out overseas U.S. and allied bases, Persian Gulf oil fields, key Israeli assets and eventually even commercial shipping and warships. The good news is there’s still time to halt the system’s proliferation, but only if we act quickly.

The missile in question is an advanced version of a Scud, a 185- to 620-mile-range missile that has been in use world-wide for decades. What makes the version North Korea just tested so different is that it has a maneuvering re-entry vehicle, or MaRV, which allows the missile’s warhead to maneuver late in flight both to evade missile defenses and achieve pinpoint accuracy. China, Russia, the U.S. and South Korea have all tested MaRVs but decided, so far, not to export them. Iran has also tested a MaRV, raising questions about Tehran’s possible cooperation with Pyongyang.

The worry now is how far and quickly this technology might spread. Pyongyang has already sold ballistic missiles to seven countries, including Iran, Syria and Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. These sales generate precious hard currency for the Kim regime, which is otherwise difficult to come by as Washington continues to ratchet up sanctions.

Pyongyang will have no trouble finding customers. While only Iran or Pakistan might consider purchasing a North Korean ICBM, 15 countries besides North Korea already possess older Scud missile systems they might want to upgrade. Getting a MaRV version would be an affordable way to threaten targets that previously could have been knocked out only by a nuclear warhead or scores of missiles.

If Syria—which previously purchased Scuds from North Korea—were to acquire this missile, it would need only a handful to wipe out the bases the U.S. uses to launch airstrikes within its borders. Rebels in Yemen have repeatedly fired Scuds at Saudi air bases. Most have either missed their targets or been shot down by Saudi forces. A MaRV would ensure a successful strike. If Hezbollah, a North Korean arms customer, got its hands on the new system, it could make good on its threats to take out Israeli chemical plants and the Dimona nuclear reactor. Eventually, if paired with capable surveillance systems, MaRV Scuds could even be used against moving targets such as warships or oil tankers.

If these missiles spread, hostile nations and terror groups won’t need nuclear weapons to threaten America or its allies. They will be able to upgrade their threat level by merely trading up the Scuds they already have.

What should the Trump administration do about this? First, start talking more candidly about the threat. The U.S. Navy has been clear that it’s now vulnerable to China’s highly precise conventional MaRV missiles. Our government now needs to spotlight the threat North Korea’s MaRV Scuds will pose if these systems proliferate globally.

Second, along with developing defenses to cope with this threat, the U.S. needs to double down on blocking illicit missile exports. In 1987 Ronald Reagan worked with the Group of Seven nations to create the international Missile Technology Control Regime, which today urges missile suppliers (including Russia and China) not to export missiles capable of lifting 1,100 pounds for distances over 185 miles—precisely the type that North Korea might sell. The MTCR also serves as the basis for the 105-nation Proliferation Security Initiative, which allows countries to search ships and airplanes carrying proscribed missile technology. These tools for stifling the illegal trade of missiles have already been developed. It’s time to hone and use them.

Finally, America must get serious about restricting missile sales more generally. President Reagan wanted to eliminate what he called “nuclear missiles.” His efforts to do so—the MTCR and the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty, which banned an entire class of ground-based nuclear-capable missiles—suggest he was focused on eliminating missiles ideally suited for surprise first strikes. Given that today’s missiles are accurate enough to destroy their intended targets with conventional warheads, it’s time to update our thinking in this area.

Persuading the world’s major powers to sign on to new missile-trade restrictions will be no simple feat. Russia, for one, has already violated the existing INF Treaty. Yet before this violation, Moscow proposed expanding the INF to include other countries, especially China, the world’s largest land-based missile power. Bringing all parties to the table in good faith will be a long-term proposition. But given the missile threats that are already emerging, the time to begin is now.

Mr. Sokolski is executive director and Mr. Keck a fellow at the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:31 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

Opinion Commentary

Kim Jong Un Is Going Ballistic in More Ways Than One
https://www.wsj.com/articles/kim-jong-u … 1501446238

North Korea has developed advanced short-range weapons and is almost certain to export them.

By Henry Sokolski and
Zachary Keck
July 30, 2017 4:23 p.m. ET
26 COMMENTS

Among the many types of missiles North Korea is perfecting is a short-range system that Kim Jong Un is almost certain to export. Although not as worrisome as the intercontinental ballistic missile Pyongyang tested last Friday, this weapon has a highly accurate front end optimized to knock out overseas U.S. and allied bases, Persian Gulf oil fields, key Israeli assets and eventually even commercial shipping and warships. The good news is there’s still time to halt the system’s proliferation, but only if we act quickly.

The missile in question is an advanced version of a Scud, a 185- to 620-mile-range missile that has been in use world-wide for decades. What makes the version North Korea just tested so different is that it has a maneuvering re-entry vehicle, or MaRV, which allows the missile’s warhead to maneuver late in flight both to evade missile defenses and achieve pinpoint accuracy. China, Russia, the U.S. and South Korea have all tested MaRVs but decided, so far, not to export them. Iran has also tested a MaRV, raising questions about Tehran’s possible cooperation with Pyongyang.

The worry now is how far and quickly this technology might spread. Pyongyang has already sold ballistic missiles to seven countries, including Iran, Syria and Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. These sales generate precious hard currency for the Kim regime, which is otherwise difficult to come by as Washington continues to ratchet up sanctions.

Pyongyang will have no trouble finding customers. While only Iran or Pakistan might consider purchasing a North Korean ICBM, 15 countries besides North Korea already possess older Scud missile systems they might want to upgrade. Getting a MaRV version would be an affordable way to threaten targets that previously could have been knocked out only by a nuclear warhead or scores of missiles.

If Syria—which previously purchased Scuds from North Korea—were to acquire this missile, it would need only a handful to wipe out the bases the U.S. uses to launch airstrikes within its borders. Rebels in Yemen have repeatedly fired Scuds at Saudi air bases. Most have either missed their targets or been shot down by Saudi forces. A MaRV would ensure a successful strike. If Hezbollah, a North Korean arms customer, got its hands on the new system, it could make good on its threats to take out Israeli chemical plants and the Dimona nuclear reactor. Eventually, if paired with capable surveillance systems, MaRV Scuds could even be used against moving targets such as warships or oil tankers.

If these missiles spread, hostile nations and terror groups won’t need nuclear weapons to threaten America or its allies. They will be able to upgrade their threat level by merely trading up the Scuds they already have.

What should the Trump administration do about this? First, start talking more candidly about the threat. The U.S. Navy has been clear that it’s now vulnerable to China’s highly precise conventional MaRV missiles. Our government now needs to spotlight the threat North Korea’s MaRV Scuds will pose if these systems proliferate globally.

Second, along with developing defenses to cope with this threat, the U.S. needs to double down on blocking illicit missile exports. In 1987 Ronald Reagan worked with the Group of Seven nations to create the international Missile Technology Control Regime, which today urges missile suppliers (including Russia and China) not to export missiles capable of lifting 1,100 pounds for distances over 185 miles—precisely the type that North Korea might sell. The MTCR also serves as the basis for the 105-nation Proliferation Security Initiative, which allows countries to search ships and airplanes carrying proscribed missile technology. These tools for stifling the illegal trade of missiles have already been developed. It’s time to hone and use them.

Finally, America must get serious about restricting missile sales more generally. President Reagan wanted to eliminate what he called “nuclear missiles.” His efforts to do so—the MTCR and the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty, which banned an entire class of ground-based nuclear-capable missiles—suggest he was focused on eliminating missiles ideally suited for surprise first strikes. Given that today’s missiles are accurate enough to destroy their intended targets with conventional warheads, it’s time to update our thinking in this area.

Persuading the world’s major powers to sign on to new missile-trade restrictions will be no simple feat. Russia, for one, has already violated the existing INF Treaty. Yet before this violation, Moscow proposed expanding the INF to include other countries, especially China, the world’s largest land-based missile power. Bringing all parties to the table in good faith will be a long-term proposition. But given the missile threats that are already emerging, the time to begin is now.

Mr. Sokolski is executive director and Mr. Keck a fellow at the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:31 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

US warns Pyongyang ‘time for talk is over’ as bombers fly over Korean skies
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07 … ly-korean/

Harriet Alexander, New York

30 July 2017 • 9:45pm

The United States’ ambassador to the UN has said there is “no point” in having an emergency session at the Security Council to discuss North Korea, warning the rogue regime that “the time for talk is over”.

Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s ruler, personally oversaw the launch on Friday of the country’s second intercontinental ballistic missile test this month. The missile is believed by the Pentagon to be capable of reaching mainland USA.

Mr Kim’s government said on Sunday that the test was designed as “a stern warning” against further sanctions.

“The test-fire of ICBM this time is meant to send a stern warning to the US making senseless remarks, being lost to reason in the frantic sanctions and pressure campaign against the DPRK,” it said.

The test sparked deep consternation in the US, with calls for an emergency session at the UN.

But Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said it was a waste of time.

“North Korea is already subject to numerous Security Council resolutions that they violate with impunity and that are not complied with by all UN Member States,” she said, in a statement issued on Sunday.

“An additional Security Council resolution that does not significantly increase the international pressure on North Korea is of no value. In fact, it is worse than nothing, because it sends the message to the North Korean dictator that the international community is unwilling to seriously challenge him.”

She reiterated President Donald Trump’s view that China must do more to rein in the pariah state – China being its main trading partner and protector.

He tweeted on Saturday that they “do NOTHING” to rebuke Pyongyang.

Mrs Haley said that China must now condemn North Korea for its repeated missile tests.

“China must decide whether it is finally willing to take this vital step,” she said.

“The time for talk is over. The danger the North Korean regime poses to international peace is now clear to all.”

Earlier on Saturday the US flew two supersonic bombers over the Korean Peninsula.

The B-1 bombers were escorted by South Korean fighter jets as they performed a low-pass over an air base near the South Korean capital of Seoul before returning to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:25 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

July 31, 2017 ReadyMom 0

US warns Pyongyang ‘time for talk is over’ as bombers fly over Korean skies
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07 … ly-korean/

Harriet Alexander, New York

30 July 2017 • 9:45pm

The United States’ ambassador to the UN has said there is “no point” in having an emergency session at the Security Council to discuss North Korea, warning the rogue regime that “the time for talk is over”.

Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s ruler, personally oversaw the launch on Friday of the country’s second intercontinental ballistic missile test this month. The missile is believed by the Pentagon to be capable of reaching mainland USA.

Mr Kim’s government said on Sunday that the test was designed as “a stern warning” against further sanctions.

“The test-fire of ICBM this time is meant to send a stern warning to the US making senseless remarks, being lost to reason in the frantic sanctions and pressure campaign against the DPRK,” it said.

The test sparked deep consternation in the US, with calls for an emergency session at the UN.

But Nikki Haley, US ambassador to the UN, said it was a waste of time.

“North Korea is already subject to numerous Security Council resolutions that they violate with impunity and that are not complied with by all UN Member States,” she said, in a statement issued on Sunday.

“An additional Security Council resolution that does not significantly increase the international pressure on North Korea is of no value. In fact, it is worse than nothing, because it sends the message to the North Korean dictator that the international community is unwilling to seriously challenge him.”

She reiterated President Donald Trump’s view that China must do more to rein in the pariah state – China being its main trading partner and protector.

He tweeted on Saturday that they “do NOTHING” to rebuke Pyongyang.

Mrs Haley said that China must now condemn North Korea for its repeated missile tests.

“China must decide whether it is finally willing to take this vital step,” she said.

“The time for talk is over. The danger the North Korean regime poses to international peace is now clear to all.”

Earlier on Saturday the US flew two supersonic bombers over the Korean Peninsula.

The B-1 bombers were escorted by South Korean fighter jets as they performed a low-pass over an air base near the South Korean capital of Seoul before returning to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam.

Statistics: Posted by ReadyMom — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:25 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: AI Getting away from us?

July 31, 2017 NJMike 0

Well, that’s concerning. I’m not a fan of AI, at all.

I read a related article that said the unintelligible language was actually more of a shorthand with fewer words. It’s probably not unlike how adults can’t understand the new words kids come up with. Or how preppers can communicate certain ideas among ourselves, that the public at large might be clueless about.

Given we know people familiar with one another are able to speak and have a double meaning to communicate in what is said, why not the same with AI? I wouldn’t doubt that the programmers forcing AI bots to converse only in English, will as a byproduct cause the AIs to learn interleaving hidden messages within their communications. I doubt we’d be able to see a pattern of coded messages between AI bots if it’s done that way, and if detected we’d still have trouble discerning what’s being said.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:09 am


No Picture

Terrorism & other Man made disasters • Re: Using Foil for a faraday cage

July 31, 2017 stonyman002 0

Four years ago as I was putting together my bug out bag, I dug around in line and found several posts that said several layers of tin foil would work. Depending on the post, some said as few as 7 layers and some said as many 10. My thoughts were it would depend on the thickness of the foil. I packed a small am/fm radio in my bob with 15 pieces of tin foil wrapped around it. Won’t know if it works till after the event. But worst case scenario I have 15 pieces of tin foil in my bob for cooking.

Statistics: Posted by stonyman002 — Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:46 am


No Picture

General Preparedness Discussion • Re: JULY 2017 – What Did You Do To Prep This Week/Month?

July 31, 2017 NJMike 0

Spent more time getting the house ready for sale, so not alot of prepping activity this week. Bought my tickets for the Mother Earth News Fair in PA in September. Ordered some small AGM deep cycle batteries for my modest test solar panel. Only planning to use this system for recharging small electronics batteries, like for my HT comms equipment or running a radio straight off the AGM batteries. Also read through a book on solar I’d ordered. Useful in the theory, but was based more on planning for house systems.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Sun Jul 30, 2017 10:40 pm


No Picture

A.N.T.S. • Re: Reserve Currency

July 31, 2017 daaswampman 0
Cadit wrote:
Thanks for all the comments and yes; I did go overboard on the weight, but to make point. I see that each of you think much that same, it would be a burden to have a large amount of either. If I had any Gold or Silver, it would be in small amounts: 1/8 gram, 1/2 gram and so on. No bars, just old silver and Gold coins. I was a treasure for about 35 years and it’s been reported that there is more money buried than there is in circulation. I’ve found my share of silver, but much less in the old gold coins. It’s amazing how our former generations buried their money and valuables to keep them safe from robbers and looters, only to die and no one else knew where it was buried. The tells I could tell.

Anyway: Handyman had in my opinion one of the better options; burying your cash and make sure that your most trusted kin knew also. Maybe even have them contributing to the pot so that both parties were invested. Plus: I too am a firm believer in Multiple bury plots, no need to have all your eggs in the same basket as the old saying goes. I like panning for gold too, fun and relaxing, and if you happen to find a good spot, profitable.

You fail to mention that many fortunes are passed generation to generation, without anyone knowing or taxes paid! Any investment involves risks and requires some planning. I would wager more money has been lost in bank deposits, stocks, and bonds, than all the lost gold and silver in history.

I view it as insurance and hope I never need it, but should it be lost in time after I am gone and some treasure hunter has a good day – so what! Unless your kids are Preppers and mine are not, all the crap we buy, will most likely go for pennies on the dollar or go to the dump.

I know this as I have bought and sold many estates with some from prepared people. Most goes to the dump, some can be sold if dirt cheap, and there may be some keepers. Quality guns, vintage tools, real antiques, and PM are the only Prepper stuff that hold any real value. Once you assumes room temperature, It’s market value and it just ain’t worth much. Swamp

Statistics: Posted by daaswampman — Sun Jul 30, 2017 8:54 pm